Newton’s Scientific Papers

Sorted by date

1.

Pierpont Morgan Notebook

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MA 318, The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00001

2.

'Quæstiones quædam Philosophiæ' ('Certain Philosophical Questions')

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3996, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00092

3.

Newton's Waste Book

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 4004, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00176

4.

Mathematical Notebook

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 4000, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00128

5.

Unarranged fragments, mostly relating to the dispute with Leibniz

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3968, ff. 594r-619v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00385

6.

'Of Colours'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3975, pp. 1-22, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00004

7.

Method of Curves and Infinite Series, and application to the Geometry of Curves

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3960.14, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00299

8.

The Lawes of Motion

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3958.5, ff. 81r-83v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00105

9.

Apographum schediasmatis a Newtono olim scripti

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3968, ff. 1r-2v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00345

10.

The October 1666 Tract on Fluxions

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3958.3, ff. 48v-63v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00100

11.

De Solutione Problematum per Motum

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3958.3, ff. 68r-76v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00101

12.

Lectiones Opticae

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 4002, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00306

13.

De Analysi per aequationes numero terminorum infinitas

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS/81/4, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00204

14.

Unpublished Appendix to 'methodus': Problem IX

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3960.4, pp. 33-48, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00295

15.

Letter to Henry Oldenburg, 16 March 1671

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/35, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00307

16.

Letter to Henry Oldenburg, 19 March 1671

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/36, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00308

17.

Newton's figure of his reflecting telescope with explanations

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/37, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00309

18.

Note about his reflecting telescope

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/50, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00320

19.

Draft of 'A Theory Concerning Light and Colors'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3970.3, ff.460-466, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00003

20.

A Letter of Mr. Isaac Newton … containing his New Theory about Light and Colors

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Isaac Newton, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, No. 80 (19 Feb. 1671/2), pp. 3075-3087.

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00006

21.

An Extract of a Letter, received very lately, (March 19th) from the Inventor of this new Telescope, from Cambridge

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Isaac Newton, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, No. 81 (25 March 1672), pp. 4009-4010.

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00030

22.

An Accompt of a New Catadioptrical Telescope invented by Mr. Newton

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Isaac Newton, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, No. 81 (25 March 1672), pp. 4004-4007.

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00007

23.

Copy of a letter to John Collins, dated 9 April 1672

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/46, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00316

24.

Letter to Henry Oldenburg, dated 13 April 1672

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: EL/N1/38, Royal Society Library, London, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00310

25.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: MS Add. 3976, ff. 8r-9v, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: NATP00390

[1]

Described and partially published (as far as the conjuring tricks), with selected facsimiles of the later pages, in D.E. Smith, 'Two Unpublished Documents of Isaac Newton', 16-31. One very brief shorthand entry ('A remedy for a Ague') is deciphered in Westfall, 'Short Writing', 13. The word-lists are based on Francis Gregory's school text-book Nomenclatura brevis anglo-Latinis (1654), though with some interesting and (debatably) suggestive additions and variants: see Manuel, Portrait, 11-12, 27, 30, 34, 37, 69-70, 397-8.

[2]

Pocket memorandum notebook covering the end of Newton's schooldays and the beginning of his university career.

On the first leaf (in Newton's hand): 'Isacus Newton hunc librum possidet teste Edwardo Secker pret: 2d ob. 1659'. Contains technical advice on drawing, various medical recipes, instructions for performing conjuring tricks, astronomical charts, accounts of Copernican astronomy and 'Drebles Motion' [i.e. the supposed perpetual motion machine of Cornelius Drebbel], mathematical exercises, notes on universal character, and several lists of words, under assorted subject headings, beginning with the same letter.

One of four notebooks, with those in Trinity College Library, Cambridge University Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum, which supply the main source of evidence about Newton's interests and activities during his early years at Cambridge.

[3] 58ff.

[4]

in English

[5]

This undergraduate notebook charts the beginnings of Newton's scientific career. Ignoring the traditional Aristotelian curriculum, Newton packed his private notebook with analyses and criticisms of the latest theories in mathematics, optics and physics, together with a wide range of his own 'philosophical questions'.

[6]

The last section (ff. 87-135) is reproduced (in both diplomatic and modernised transcriptions), with an extensive introduction and commentary, in McGuire and Tamny, Certain Philosophical Questions (text on pp. 329-465). See also the detailed discussion in Westfall, Never at Rest, 89-97.

[7]

On front flyleaf: 'Isaac Newton/ Trin: Coll Cant/ 1661', and, in Thomas Pellet's hand: Sep. 25 1727/ Not fit to be printed/ T: Pellet'. Written from both ends: the foliation, which was added later (probably by University Library staff) starts from the front (30 ff. including the front flyleaf as f. 1) and resumes from the back (ff. 31-140).

ff. 3-15 Greek notes from Aristotle's Organon.

ff. 16-26r Latin notes from Johannes Magirus's Physiologiæ peripateticæ.

ff. 26v-30v English notes on astronomy.

[from back of book:]

ff. 34r-81v Greek and Latin notes from various sources.

ff. 83r-v English notes on Descartes.

ff. 87r-135r 'Questiones quædam Philosophcæ [sic]', in English. Notes on a huge range of topics relating to natural philosophy and reflecting the development of Newton's personal and largely extra-curricular interests during his student years. Some of the last entries ('Of God', f. 128, 'Of ye Creation', f. 129, 'Of ye soule', f. 130) introduce a theological note.

[8] 140 ff. of which 13 blank.

[9]

in Greek, Latin and English

[10]

[11] 2181 ff.

[12] Newton's Waste Book (Part 1) Newton's Waste Book (Part 2) Newton's Waste Book (Part 3)

[13] 170 pp.

[14]

[15] 16 ff.

[16]

in French, English and Latin

[17]

An illustrated account of Newton's first ventures into optical experimentation. Using his own eyes as subjects, he seriously risked blinding himself with experiments such as staring directly into the sun or poking a small knife into his eye socket to see what effect this would have on his visual perceptions. Astonishingly, his eyesight remained excellent until his death at the age of over eighty.

[18]

Develops the optical theories discussed in CUL Additional Ms. 3996.

[19] 22 pp.

[20]

in English

[21]

[22] 53 pp.

[23]

in Latin with a few words of Greek

[24] Method of Curves and Infinite Series, and application to the Geometry of Curves (Part 1) Method of Curves and Infinite Series, and application to the Geometry of Curves (Part 2) Method of Curves and Infinite Series, and application to the Geometry of Curves (Part 3)

[25]

[26] 6 pp.

[27]

[28] 2 pp of 2 fos.

[29]

in English with some Latin

[30] 29 pp.

[31]

[32] 29 pp.

[33]

[34] 129 ff.

[35]

in Latin with some English and Greek

[36]

[37] 15 pp. on 9 ff.

[38]

in Latin

[39] 12 pp.

[40]

in Latin

[41]

[42] 2 pp.

[43]

Published in H.W. Turnbull (ed), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, vol. 1 (Cambridge: 1959), p. 120

[44]

in English

[45] Letter to Henry Oldenburg, 19 March 1671 [EL/N1/36]

[46] 2 pp.

[47]

Published in H.W. Turnbull (ed), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, vol. 1 (Cambridge: 1959), p. 121

Letter to Henry Oldenburg, 16 March 1671 [EL/N1/35]

[48]

in English

[49] 2 pp.

[50]

Published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, No. 81 (25 March 1672), pp. 4004-4007.

Letter to Henry Oldenburg, 19 March 1671 [EL/N1/36] An Accompt of a New Catadioptrical Telescope invented by Mr. Newton [Philosophical Transactions 81 (25 March 1672)]

[51]

in English

[52] 1 p.

[53]

in English and French

[54] 14pp.

[55]

in English

[56]

[57] 13pp.

[58]

in English

[59] Robert Hooke's Critique of Newton's Theory of Light and Colors (delivered 1672) [History of the Royal Society, Vol. 3 (1757)] Some Experiments propos'd in relation to Mr. Newton's Theory of light … together with the Observations made thereupon by the Author of that Theory [Philosophical Transactions 83 (20 May 1672)] A Latin Letter … by Ignatius Gaston Pardies … containing some Animadversions upon Mr. Isaac Newton … his Theory of Light [Philosophical Transactions 84 (17 June 1672)] A Letter of the Learn'd Franc. Linus … animadverting upon … Mr. Isaac Newton's Theory of Light and Colors, date 6 October 1674 [Philosophical Transactions 110 (25 January 1674/5)] A Letter from Liege concerning Mr Newton's Experiment of the colour'd Spectrum [Philosophical Transactions 128 (25 September 1676)]

[60] 2 pp.

[61]

in English

[62] Christiaan Huygens' comments on Newton's telescope [Philosophical Transactions 81 (25 March 1672)]

[63] 4pp.

[64]

in English

[65] Christiaan Huygens' comments on Newton's telescope [Philosophical Transactions 81 (25 March 1672)] Newton's figure of his reflecting telescope with explanations [EL/N1/37]

[66] 4 pp.

[67]

in English

[68] 2 pp.

[69]

Published in H.W. Turnbull (ed), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, vol. 1 (Cambridge: 1959), p. 140

A Latin Letter … by Ignatius Gaston Pardies … containing some Animadversions upon Mr. Isaac Newton … his Theory of Light [Philosophical Transactions 84 (17 June 1672)] Mr Newtons Letter of April 13. 1672 … being an Answer to the fore-going Letter of P. Pardies [Philosophical Transactions 84 (17 June 1672)]

[70]

in English

[71] Editorial Note: This Note Empty

© 2020 The Newton Project

Professor Rob Iliffe
Director, AHRC Newton Papers Project

Scott Mandelbrote,
Fellow & Perne librarian, Peterhouse, Cambridge

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL - newtonproject@history.ox.ac.uk

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