<1r>

Sir Isaac Newton's
{Notebook's}

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Isacus Newton hunc librum possidet
test:
Edvardo Secker
pret: 2d ob.
1659.

<3r>

Of Drawing.

Instruments of drawing.

Pens made of Raven quils. thick & smooth paper. & light coulored blew paper. fine parchment. a flat thin bras ruler. a paire of compasses. a wing. & sundry plummetts. & pestells to draw with=all.

Of plummets.

Ther are naturall plummetts not made. as blacklead. black chalk. charecole {split}. red stone. white chalke. & there are artificiall plummits. Thus made.

Take a great chalk stone & make furrows in it 2 or 3 inches long & so wide as you may lay a quil in each of them. Then take a proportion of white chalke ground verry fine, temper it with aile, or wort & a little new milke, & soe make pap thereof: then power it into the furrows of the chalke. you may soone tak them out & role them up, or let them lie in the chalk till they be quite dry & then take them out & scrape them into a hansome forme.

You may temper Lake with burnt Alabaster for a red. &

Alabaster burnt & bice for a blew. & so for others: regarding some {illeg} that will bind over hard which must have a little water put on them in their grinding.

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Of Drawing with the pen

Let the thing which you intend to draw stand before you, so that the light be not hindred from falling upon it. & with a pointed peice of charecole draw it rudely & lightly when you have don see if it be well don; if not wipe out with your wing & begin agine, & so draw it till it bee well. then wipe it over gently with your wing, so that you may perceive your former strokes; then with your black chalk or pensill draw it perfectly & curiously as you can, & shaddow it as the light falleth upon it. If you draw on blew paper when you have finished your draught wet your paper in fair wait & let it dry of it self. & so the drawing will hold fast on.

Of Drapery.

Draw the utmost lines of your garment, & the greater folds first which continue through the whole garment, then break the greater folds into lesse, & so shaddow them.

Of Landskip.

If you express the sunn make it riseing or setting behind some hill; but never expres the moone or starrs but upon necessity.

Of Emblem or Empresse work.

In drawing after the life sit not nearer than two yards from the partie, & sit of one height. but if the party you draw be very tall let him sit aboue you a little if {short} or a child let him sit a little below you If you draw from the head to the foot let the <4r> the party stand at the least six yards from you. let the party stand for few can sit {illeg} upright as they can stand.

ffirst, draw the stroake for the forehead, which must bee done exactly, because according to that proportion must all the rest bee drawn as if the fore head bee soe long, then must it be twice so long from the forehead to the chin. then draw the farthest eye making the circle of the sight perfectly round & placing the reflection of the sight which appeareth as a white speck, acording to the light. 3. draw the nose. forthly the nearest eye, leaving the just lenght of an eye betweene it & the other. 5. Draw the mouth. 6 The chin. 7 finish the out line of the face. & lastly the haire. having finished the head draw the whole body proportionable thereunto.

Of Shaddowing.

To shaddow sweetly & rowndly withall is a far greater cunning than to shaddow hard & darke; for it best to shaddow as if it were not shaddowed.

To take a perfect drawgh of a picture.

Take a sheet of venise or of the finest paper you can get, wet it all over with cleane salitt oyle, then wipe the sallett away so that the paper may be dry throughly. then lay the paper on the picture, & you shall see the picture through the paper, & then with a pensill draw it over, & then with a pen. Then take of the oyled paper & lay it on a cleane sheete, & with a stick pointed, or a fether of a swallow <4v> wing, draw it over againe, & you shall have it neatly drawne on the white paper.

Another way.

Take some Lake & grind it fine & temper it with linseed oyle, & then with a pen & this mixture draw out all the great strokes of any picture & also the {mustler} Wet then the contrary side of the picture, & pre{ss} it hard upon the sheet of cleane paper & it will leave behind it al the stroks you drew.

An easy way to lesson or enlarge a picture

Make a square, & then divide it into divers equall parts with the compasses, & draw o'rethwart lines with a ruler & a pensill, so that the pictur be divided into equall squares, & so make squares on a faire paper as little or big as you will, but let ther bee soemany, as there is in the picture, then observing the order of the squares draw the pictur over with a pensill pasing from square to square.

How to make Allum water

Take a quart of mater & boyle it in a quarter of a pound of Allum, seeth it untill it be molten, & let it stand a day with this water wet over the pictures that you intend to colour for it will keepe the colours for sinking into the paper, & make them shew fairer, & continue the longer without faiding. You must let the paper dry of it selfe before you lay your colours on it or wet it againe for some paper needs four or 5 wetings.

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How to make gum water

{Ta}ke cleane water & put gum Arabick a little to it, let it stand till the gum be disolved, & let it {not} bee too thick for you cannot work well with it nor {too} thin for it will not bind fast enough. with this wa{t}er temper your colours befor you lay them on.

To make lime water.

Take unslackt lime & cover it with water, an inch thick let it stand a night & power of the cleare water in the morning, & keepe it in a cleane thing for your use. with this water you must temper your sap greene when you would have a blew coulour of it.

To make water of sope ashes.

Steepe sope ashes a night in raine water, in the morning power of the clearest. this is to temper your brasill with.

How to prepare your colours

Such colours as have need of grinding you must grind them with faire water, then put them on a smoth chalk stone, & let them dry. then grind them againe with Gum water & reserve them in muscle shels for your use.

A sea colour.

Take privet berries when the sun entreth into Libra, about the 13th of September, dry them in the sunn; then bruise them & steepe them in Allum water, & straine them into an earthen poringer that is glazed

Another

Take blew Inde & steepe it in water & put to it a little Verditer.

A yellow colour.

Take yellow berrys, & bruse them & steepe them a quarter of an hower in allum water then strain them if you will or let them stand in liquour.

A Haire colour.

Take umber or spanish browne grind it & temper it with gum water.

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A russet colour.

Take the fattest sut you can get & p{ut} it into a pot of cleare water so that it be covered two or 3 fingers & let it seeth well which don straine it through a cloth set it on thefire againe to thiken (but take heed you set it not on too hot a fire for feare of burning it) & so let it boyle gently till it bee as thick as you would have it.

A colour for faces

Lay on thecheekes little spotts of lake or red lead then come all over it with white, & a little lake, shaddow it with Lamblack or umber, & white lead.

Colours for naked pictures

Take white leade & a little Vermilion temper them & lay them on, shaddow it with bolearmonick in the middle & adde a little sut to the utmost double hatches.

A colour for dead corpes.

Change white leade with the water of yellow berrys & wash the picture all ouer then chang it with blew Indie & shaddow it in the single hatches, & leanest places then take sut, yellow berrys & whit{e} lead & with that shadow the darkest places

A blood red colour.

Sinaper, lake, & vermillion make a good red.

Another.

Take some of the clearest blood of a sheepe & put it into a bladder & with a needle prick holes in thebottom of it then <6r> hang it up to dry in the sunne; & disolve it {i}n allum water according as you have need.

Colours for garmens.

A purple colour.

Take log wood, & seeth it in vinegar & small beare in an earthen pot, & put a little allum therein till it tast strong.

A red colour

Boyle brasill as you did the log-wood. but if you would have it a sad red mingle it with pot ash water, if a light red temper it with white lead.

A Crimson

Cynaper tops: Cynaper-lake: or vermilion.

A green

Take privet berry water, & chang it with yellow berry water, & it giveth a perfit greene for the ground.

Another greene.

Take spannish greene cleane pickt & steeped in Rhenish wine, straine it & put unto it a little honey or white suger candey & it will make a good greene.

A light greene.

Temper Verdigrease, & white lead 2 Verdigrease as much yellow berrys & a little white

Yellow colours

Orpiment & saphron, Mastirol, Gambugium either of these giv a good yellow.

Blew.

Verditer, Azure or Bice, blew Inde.

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Colours for building

Lay black & white leads for the walls of churches, conduits, & greater buildings Bolus for the pillars & less houses red lead for tiles, for the leads blew & white, for cottages sut alone

Colours for Landskip

Lay verditer, blew, white, & greene; or first goe all ouer it with saffron & whit{e} then put a little sut to it & goe over it againe.

Or first take greene & white lead & goe ouer it shaddow it with a little more greene, then with white & last of {all} with greene, a little white & yellow berryes.

Sky colours

Brasill & white lead is the lightest, then light purple & white, then Inde blew & white, the darkest is Inde blew.

Clowd colours

The lightest is whitelead & Inde blew a like quantaty of each, the next a deale of Inde & a little white, then purple & white with a little brasill, then whit lead & yellow berrys.

Colours for the sone beames.

Lay yellow berrys with a little white shaddow it with saffron & red lead.

A lyon tawney.

This is made of red lead & Masticot.

A peach colour.

This is of ceruse & Vermilion.

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A bras colour.

This is made of Masticot, & umber.

A marble or ash colour.

This is black & white.

A russit colour

A little white & a good quantety of red.

A browne blew

Take 2 two parts of Inde baudias, & a third of Ceruse

A Crane colour.

It is of black lead & ground with gum water.

To write gold with the pen or pensill

Take a shell of gold, & put a little gum water into it, & work with it.

How to write a gold colour.

Take a new laid egg, make a hole at one end & let out the substance then take the yolk without the white, & four times soe much quicksilver in quantitie as of theformer grind them well together & put them into the shell stop the hole thereof with chalk & the white of an egg then lay it under a hen that sitt with 6 more for the space of 3 wekes, then break it up & write with it.

fflesh colour.

Take white lead grind it with oyle, lake, & vermilion so you may make it pale or high coloured at your pleasur.

A White colour.

White lead ground with nut oyle.

Charecole black & seacole black

Grind charcole very small with water, let it dry then grind it with oyle. thus make seacole black.

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A colour for silver.

Take charecole blacke & white leade

A colour for gold.

Take Lake umber red lead & Masticot.

To lay gold on any thing.

Take red lead ground very fine temper it with Linseed oyle, write with it & lay leafe gold on it, let it dry, & pollish it.

To melt mettle quickly yea in a shel

Make a bed or laying of metle, & on it make a other bed with powder of brimstone salt peeter & sawdust, & like quantitie of either then put a fire to the said powder with a burning charcole & it will bee in a mass.

To make a hard glew.

Take of the powder of tile sheard two pound unslakt lime 4 pound, linseed oyle a sufficient quantaty to temper the whole mixture. & it is very strong

To make wood or bone red {alway}

Take the powder of brasill mingle it with mill woll, but so that it may be very red, & let the wood or bone lie 8 days in it.

A good cement for broken glasses.

Take raw silke & beat it with glasse & mix them together with whites of eggs.

A bait to catch fish.

Take Cocculus Indiæ unciæ ss. henbane seeds, & wheaten flower of each a quarter of an ounce, hive honey as much as will <8r> {m}ake them into past. Where you see the most {f}ish cast in bits like barly cornes, & they will swim on the top of the water, so that you {m}ay take them up with your hands or a nett. If it rane after the bate is cast into thewater or if you put them in other faire water they will come to themselves.

You may in the dead of winter in the morning when the sun shines catch fish with your angle bated onely with past wad of wheat flower

To make birds drunk.

Take such meat as they love as wheat, barley &c. steepe it in lees of wine or in the juice of Hemlock, & sprincle it wher birds use to haunt. Sodden Garlick sprinkled amongst corne sowne.

To catch crows, or ravens.

Take the liver of a beast & cut it into divers peeces, put some nux Vomica into each peece. & lay them where crows haunt.

To catch crows or pigeons.

Tak whit pease & steepe them 8 or 9 days in the gall of an ox. & lay them where they haunt.

To make pigeons, partriges dicks & other birds drunk.

Set black wine for them to drink where they come.

Another

Take tormentill, byle it in good wine put barley into it. Lay it where the birds com. this should be don in winter when snow is.

Another way to catch birds.

[1]Make past of barley meale onion blads, & hen-bane seeds, & set it on severall little boards or tiles, or such like for the birds

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[2]To make pearles of {Chalk}

Take some chalke & put it into the fire there let it lye till it breake, temper it with the whits of eggs & make divers fassions of pearles both great & {smal} wet them being dryed & cover them with leafe gold. & they are done

A secret for travellers.

Let travelers take a peece of Roch allum, & hold it now & then for a small time in their mouths for when they are hot it will coole them & refresh them & quench their thirst more than beer will.[3]

There is also a stone (which the Mounte bancks call a Celestiall or miraculus stone & the Apothecarys lapis prunella) which dos mot much differ from this it is onely better.

A Salve for all sores.

Take a pound of sheeps tallow a pound of turpentine & a pound of Virgin wax, a pint of sallet oyle, a quarter of a pound of Rosin: take also of Bugle, Smalsach, & plantaine halfe the quantity of the other or so much as will make a pinte boyle all these together on a soft fire of coles, always stir it till a 3d part be consumed, then tak it from the fire & straine it through a new canvas cloth, into an earthen pot.

To make red printing Ink.

[4]Take a spoonefull of Vermilion the quantity of a hazell nut of cleane turpentine with a <9r> {sp}oonefull & a half of linseed oyle grind {them} together on a painters stone.

To make a blew printing ink.

{Ta}ke bice or smalt & grind them with oyle {of} turpentine as you did the former

To mak yellow printing ink.

Take refin'd Orpiment, & use it as you did the former.

To make greene printing ink

Take Verdigrease or spanish greene very cleane without stalks, & grind it as theformer

To make black printing ink.

Ther is a black earth which those that print maps use & grind it with oyle & turpentine as you did the former.

How to write on black paper.[5]

Take the yolk of a new layd egg & grind it on a marble with faire water so as you may write with it. then write what you will with it & when it is dry black all the paper over with ink & when it is dry, you may scrape all the letters that you wrot of with a knife

To ingrave on a flint.[6]

Take a flint & write on it what you will with the tallow of an ox, afterward lay the flint in Vinegar 4 days.

<9v>

To make the Balsom, of Vincent Lanrelles, good for all greene wounds Palsies, Paines proceeding from a cold cause, Gouts, straines, Bruises Aches, Sciatica Cramps. &c

Take of Hysop, Margerom, Tyme, Rosemary, Sage, Baume, Wormwood Rue, Winter, Savory, Calamint, Southern-wood, Saint Iohn's wort, Peny royall, Nep, Clowns, All-heale, Sanicle, Selfe-heale, Speed-well, Mother of time, Adders-tongue, ffennel, of earth a good handfull, Let them bee all greene, & clense them very well from dirt, & dampe them well in a stone morter, then take a Gallon of the best Sallad Oyle, & put the Herbes soe bruised, & the oyle altogether in an earthen pot, & add thereunto 3 pints of the best spannish wine, & stir them well together, & cover them close & then let them stand so in infusion 24 howers; then put them all into a large brass pan, & over a soft gentle charecole fire boyle them till all the humidity bee evaporated, then pres them off very hard into another fit vessell & then take Myrrh 3 ounces, alloes the best & ffrankincense of each 2 ounces, Tachamahara, & Gum-elemy <10r> {ea}ch one ounce, dissolve the Gumms in {sack}, & straine them through a linnen cloth. Then take Wax, rosin, Burgundy-pith, & Colophony. of each a pound Turpentine 4 ounces dissolve them over the fire & mix a little of your Oyle with them. wherein your hearbs were infused; & then by degrees more & more; & at last all. Then doe soe likewise to gums. ffirst, put in a spoonefull of the Oyle, Wax, & Colophony, mingled together in Gums, & stir them well together, then more and more till at last you have incorporated them all together; then take liquid-Storax 4 ounces, Oyle of spike 3 ounces, Chimicall Oyle of cloves, Nutmegs, Amber, of each two drams; stir them well together, but bee sure you put not in your Chimicall oyle till your Bason bee almost cold

To make his oyntment for all burning & skalding by a fire or Gunpouder. Likewise it aswageth all manner of inflammations, or Gallings by riding or of young Children. &c.

Take henbane, Hemlock, Lettice, Mandrake leaves, of each one handfull and a halfe, Poplar buds 4 ounces, Houseleeke & Peny-wort of <10v> {each} one good handfull Colewort leaves 3 good handfulls; 7 great old onyons stamp them all in a morter; & put them into two quarts of oyle of violets, & let them infuse 12 howers in warme ashes; then give them 5 or 6 boyles over the fire, then put in halfe a pint of wine-Vinegar, & then byle them again till all the Vinegar bee consumed then streine them hard off, & ad as much wax to the oyle thus streined off as you will give the consistanc{e} of an oyntment; then put it up when it is cold, & let it bee for your use.

A speciall remedy of his, for the tooth-ach, which never failed to give ease to any hollow tooth, or other, for a time.

[7]Take Pellitory of Spaine, long paper, Ginger, & Cloves, of each one dram; Ginny-pepper halfe a dram beate all these into a very fine powder; then with Chimicall oyle of cloves, oyle of thyme, & spirit of salt of each a like quantity, make it up into a past & out of that past make little pellets, or cakes, & dry them in the sun; & so use them

<11r>

To make his powder to purge the head.

Take ginger of the best, Orris powder of each halfe a dram; Pellitory of Spaine, & white Hellebore, of each halfe a dram; All these into a fine powder & searce them well & add to them two dropps of oyle of Anniseeds. And when you will use it take the quantitie of a barly corne & snuff it upp into your nose & it will cause a snezing, wherby it purgeth the head from all superfluous humours strengtheneth the memory causeth a cleare sight & is good for the thiknesse of hearing taken as abovesaid every other morning

An Excelent Plaister of his for cornes.

Take Gum Opoponax, Galbanum, & Gum Elemny, of each one ounce, of Venus Turpentine 4 ounces, oyle of Mastick 2 ounces, wax two ounces: disolve all these in a bras pan together, & first remember you straine your gumms, & then, according to art, incorporate, as you were taught in the Composition of your balsom then dip fine clothes in it, & let them ly till they be cold, then when any corne trobles you applie a peice. to it

<11v>

Helpes for the eye sight.

[8]Things hurtfull for the eyes.

Garlick Onions & Leeks. over much Lettice. Goeing too suddaine after me{at.} Hot wines. Cold ayre. Dunknes. Gluttony. Milke. Chese. White & red coulors. Much sleepe after Meate. Mu{ch} blood-letting. Cold worts. dust. ffire. much weeping. & watching.

Things good for the sight.

Measurable sleepe. red roses. ffennell. Selandine Vervaine rootes [9]Pimpernell. Oculus Christi. To wash your eyes in faire running water, & your hands & feet often. To looke on any greene or pleasan{t} colours, or in a faire glasse.

A Water to cleane the sight

Take greene Wallnuts husks & all a{s} they come from the trees[10] & a few of the leaves & distill them. Then drop the water thereof into your eyes morning & night for 6 or 7 days together.

[11]Drop 3 or 4 drops of the water of rotten apples at a time into your eyes

[12]Wash your eyes with the water of Dasies, both roots & leaves being cleane washed, then stamped & strained.

The juice of the hearbe           Euphasia, or the water.

<12r>

[13]Another.

{Ta}ke a new-laid Egge, roast it hard cut {the} shell in the midst & take out the yolke {cl}eane & put a peice of {Copras} in wher {the} yolke lay, binding the egg together again then set it to the fire till the {Copporas} bee disolved to water. then take all the white out of the shell cutting it in small peices, then put it into a glas of faire running water letting it stand so a litle while, then straine it throug{h} a fine lining cloth, & keepe it in a glas close stopped so wash your eyes every morning & evning therewith.

Certaine tricks

To turne waters into wine

1 Into Claret.[14]

Take as much lockwood as you can hold in your mouth without discovery tye it up in a cloth, & put it in your mouth, then sup up some wather & champe the lockwood 3 or 4 times & doe it out into a glass

2 ffor White wine.[15]

Chew the Ball once or twice lightly. &c as you did for claret.

<12v>

[16]ffor Sack.

Take a drop of Wine or beare vinegar & put it in the Glasse shakeing it about the sides of the Glasse. &c: as you did for claret

ffor Sky coloured Blew or

Put a corne of salt in the Glasse &c: as you did for clare{t}

ffor posset drinke & curds.

Take one drop of Sallot oyle, &c as you did for Sack. & it will bee posset drinke, then let it stand a while & it wil be curds.

ffor Strong Waters.

Have a cup of Strong Water by you like the other of water which drinke up as if it was the water & doe it out againe into one of the Glasses.

<13r>

To Cut a Glasse.

Take a plaine Glasse, hold it up side downeward over a candle till it bee pritty hott then take a match of rope, & blowing it all the while run it ouer the Glasse as you would have it cut.

[Editorial Note 1]

A Remedy for a Ague

[17]When Iesus saw the Crosse he trembled and he shooke, then saide the Iews what hast thou an ague or a fever or dost thou feare. No saide Iesus I have neither ague nor fever neither do I fear, but whosoever shall carry these words shall neither be troubled with ague nor fever. So be it. Amen, amen.

<13v>
[Editorial Note 2]

The moone in the signe that the sun is & degr{ee} changeth, & rises with the Sunn. Three signes before him in the same degree is her first quarter. & shee rises 6 howe{rs} before him. In the contrary signe & same degree she is in the full & rises 12 ho: before him. Three signes after him is her last quarter & she rises 6 ho: after

To know her signe & degre ad the number of the signe that the sun is in & the degr{ee} to the number against her age casting {in} every 12 signes. & making 30 degres j signe.

<14r> [Editorial Note 3]

{illeg} of the Months from March, with March, & days of the Month, make the moones age {30} being cast away in months that have 31 days & 29 in them that have not, as often as it may. ad 7 days 9 hou: ad 14 days, 18 houers ad 22 days 3 ho: to her change.

[Editorial Note 4]
<15r>

The Declination Semidiurnall arch & southing of some of the fixed stars before or after the 7 stars.

Name of the Stars.Declinat.
Deg: min
Semid
Arch
ho: mi
South:
ho: min
The brightest of the 7 Stars22 N: 538. 1600 00
Aldebaran. Bucks eye.15 n: 417. 270. 49. a
Orions bright {foote}.8 So 405. 141. 31. a
Bright foot of 7. 312. 51 a
Syrius. the grater dog: 4. 303. 3 a
Procyon. the lesser dog6. 323. 54 a
Lyons heart. Calb Elered13 n: 487. 146. 23 a
Deneb Elered. Lyons taile16 n: 427. 328. 4 a
Azimech, the virgins {pick}9 so: 85. 119. 40 a
Arcturus. Alramesh.21 n: 138. 210. 33 a
{illeg}. {bright} of the {illeg}28 n: 28. 5611. 57 a
Antares. Scorpions heart25 so: 293. 2111. 5. b.
Bright of the Dragons head{illeg}9. 38 b.
Bright of the Vulture.6. 437. 53 b
Left shoulder of 5. 236. 15 b
{Screat}.8. 424. 40 b
Girdle of Andromeda {illeg}10. 382. 37 b
<15v>

The suns Altitude throughout the yeare together with the leng{th} of the shadow of a staffe divided into 12 parts

Ad the 12th part of the meridian altitude to it & it is 11 or i. the 3d parte & it is 10 or 2. 3 qua{r}ters & it is 9 or 3. i parte & a h{alf} & it is 8 or 4. 2 parts & 32 & it is 7 or 5. 5 parts & it is 6. 11 par{ts} & it is 5. or 7

1211 1 10 29 . 58 . 47 . 56
30061 . 13{illeg} . 5652 . 58 44 . 5535 . 5526 . 3617 . {2}4
201060 . 5058 . 34 52 . 3944 . 3735 . 3836 . 1917 . 7
10.2059 . 4357 . 3051 : 41 43 . 4534 . {illeg}25 . 2916 . 16
0057 . 5555 . 47 50 . 842 . 1933 . 2624 . 914 . 54
201055 3053 . 28 48 . 140 . 2331 . 3522 . 1913 . 3
102052 3450 . 39 45 . 2437 . 5929 . 1920 . 510 . 47
0049 . 1347 . 24 42 . 2435 . 1126 . 4017 . 318 . 12
201045 . 3343 . 50 39 . 432 . 723 . 4514 . 405 . 21
102041 . 4140 . 4 35 . 3128 . 4720 . 3711 . 382 . 19
0037 . 4336. 11 31 . 5025 . 2017 . 218 2915 . 7.
201033 . 4532 . 17 28 . 821 . 5114 . 45 . 2{illeg}18 . 1.
102029 . 5328 . 29 24 . 3118 2710 . 512 . 1520 . 6.
0026 . 1324 . 53 21 . 415 . 127 . 4724 . 0.
201022 . 5321 . 35 17 . 5512 . 144 . 5823 . 5.
102019 . 5618 . 42 15 . 89 . 362 . 3033 . 2.
0 017 . 3116 . 19 12 517 . 260 2838 . 8.
201015 . 4314 . 1 11 85 . 4944 . 1.
102014 . 3613 . 26 10 5{illeg} . 4947 . 5
0014 . 1313 4 9 434 . 2848 . 6.
<16r>

The moone will be eclipsed {if} her latitude at the full be under 58min {illeg}". She is Eclipsed so many digits {a}s there are 2m: 40" wanting from her latitude 58m 40". ffor the Diameter of the shaddow of the Earth being about 1 degree 25m 20" or 26 min: & the diameter of the moone being 32min it must needs follow that her centre must approach to the centre of the shaddow within 58min. 40" or 59m. before she can be Eclipsed.

<16v>

Systema mundanum secundum Copernicum.

Make a circumference for the Zodiack divide it into 12 signes or {illeg} Place in the centre. Make the centre of the earth almost 4 of s diametars from his centre towards the Earth Aphelion i.e. {two} degrees 2m 13sec towards Cancer's 7th degree. ma{ke} its orbe or circumference so wide as that the Sun's diameter may be the 697th parte of it i.e. 31.min: Divide it into 365 equal p{arts} & let each parte stand for the Earth motion in one day 1 minute. or thus: Make the centre one degre 1min 6sec from the Sun's. make the circumference as before: take a new center two degrees 2min 13sec from on the same side. make a circumference about it & divide it into 365 parts, drawing lines from each opposite marke through the same centre. then marke the places {on} the sphære of which those lines cut. & you have the Earths motion each day, & 1 min Make Mercuries centre 4degr 55min towar{ds} his Aphelion from the Sunn, being in {illeg} i.e. being in 15d. Put the Earth in : {illeg} the centre of is in 25d: 6m; & the utmost parte of his sphære reacheth to the 7th d{eg} 11th min of it being 22degr: 50m distant from his centre. divide it as you did the Earth's in 88 parts by a circle whose centre is 9degr: 10m from toward his Aphelion (call this a divideing circle each part passeth over in 23h. 59m. <17r> Or thus. Make the centre of his circumference. make his circumference so large as {illeg}{illeg}. make him an Epicicle the diameter {be}ing 9 degres 50m. moves about his Epicicle {illeg} {illeg} 44 days {epicle} about in almost 88 days therefore {di}vide that circles into 88 parts & you have {his} motion each 23h 59min. divide his epicicle {in}to 44 parts & you have the like. but this will not solve the Phænomenon unles he be made to stand still in his Epicicle towards his Aphelion. & then the swiftnes of his motion in his Perihelion, & slownes Aphelion will not be solved.

Place Venus her centre about 20 or 30 min dist from the centre of . her diameter is 42deg from her centre. &c By a Degre I understand the 360th {parte} of the sphære or circumference of the earth.



Place the moone 2deg 21min in her full & change from the earth.

<17v>

Place the centre of Mars distant from 6d 46min towards Virgo 0d. 8'. 2'' let his circumference be made 98deg distant from his centre. Marke a new centre 13degr: 32m: distant from towards his Aphelion in Virgine 0d. 8'. 2''. & let the circumference of it divide the Spæ{re} of into 687 parts each parte being the sp{hære}{illeg} of his motion in a day.

<18r>

Against the Plague.

Take Alloes, Hepatick, {illeg} cinamon Myrrh of each 3 drams. Cloves, Mace, Wood of Alloës or Lignum Alloës, Mastick, Bole armoniack, of each halfe an ounce. Make a fine powder thereof, which take early in the Morning with white Wine mixt with a little Water.

An Excellent water for Vlcers.

Heate faire water in a vessell never before used: then power it into quick lime in another new vessell. Let it stand till the lime sink to the bottome & you have taken all the spume from the top. then pour the cleare water from the Lime into a cleane Glasse & stop it well up. Wash the Vlcer with it: & lay a cloth diped in it, on the sore. & it cleanses it.

Aile soden till it be like a salve helpes all sores & aches.

Of a Perpetuall Motion

Mix five ounces of with so much of grind them together with ten ounces of Sublimate, disolve them in a Cellar upon some Marble for thespace of 4 days till they become like oyle olive distill <18v> this with fire of cha{illeg} {or} driveing fire & it will sublime into a dry substance, & so by repeating these disolvings & distillings there will be at lenght produced divers small which being put into a glass well luted & kept dry will have a perpetuall motion

Of Drebles Motion

Tho: Tymme sayth it was done by extracting a fiery spirit out of the Minerall matter joyning the same with his proper aire which included in the Axle tree being hollow carrieth the other wheeles about.

Of a perpetuall Lamp.

The wike may be made of Salamanders wooll, or plumeallum, or linum vivum, otherwise asbestinum which is gotten out of the stone Asbestus or Amantus by bruising it.

(The stone asbestus being set on fire will ever burne)

The oyle must be purged from drosse & be of a tenacius & close substance so that it may slowly evaporate that the{re} may be time for the fume to turne to <19r> oyle againe, the lamp being close{d} up in a glasse.

          Or

A oyle extracted out of some Minerall as if Gold were disolved to an Vnctuous humor, or its radicall moyster seperated from it might burne for many yeares.

          Or

If fire could be detained from flying upward it might be reflected. but neither the humour nor the flame must excede the strenght of one another. & to this purpose it may be possible to extract an inflamable oyle, frome the Stone Asbestus, Amiantus, or Gold; which being of the same pure & homogeneous nature with those bodys shall be so proportioned to theheat of the fier that being on fier it may continue for may ages without sensible diminution.

If the liquor be of a close & glutinous consistency it may burne without any snuffe as in Camphire & some other Glutinous substances.

<19v>

The use of the table on a Ruler whereby to make a dyall for any latitude.

Make a streight line which you intend shall stand for 6 a clock at the Morning & night let the line be as long as from the . begining of the line of latitudes where there is a peice a bras to the degree of lattitude for which the Dyal is erected supose the 50th degree & you make the line (a b) then take the length of the line of the line of cords from the begining to the 60th degree set one foot of the compasses on a & make a scrow at t with the other foote. & doe the like at the point at b. then draw two streight lines from the place where the two scrows meet at c to a & b. as (a c, a b) & marke those lines out according to the howerline on the ruler. as d e f g h i k l m n. Then take the point twixt a & b & make a circle & draw line from each of the former marke through the circle to the center o. & those are the hower lines For the gnomen make a line as long as a c or b c was & that line must be joyned ro the dial suppose it b p. q. describe a circle as <20r> Figureq. r. Then one point of the compasses on the line of cords at the begining & let the other foot reach to the figure which is the same with the lattitude supose 50. Then set one foote of the compasses upon g another on the circle suppose it reach to r then draw a line from r to p. & that line is the line that casts the shaddow. &c

<20v>

To preserve roasted meate.

When tis well roasted cut it in peices & range it carefully & conveniently in a close caske then power as much butter melt skimed & decanted from the grosser & ranker parts as will cover the meate & fill up all its intervalls to keepe out the aire. then stop up the caske.

To preserve raw flesh

Immers it in a well stopt vessell under spirits of wine (from whose tast perhaps it may be freed by water.

ffor the stoppage of urine, wind, stikkes & obstructions of the spleene liver.

Steepe horse dung especially that of stoned horse in aile then take it out & strongly expresse the juice & drink it.

For the Plague

Take a good dose of the powder of full ripe Ivie-berrys. after that the aforesd juice of horse dung.

To stanch Blood

Beate 2 Drachmes of Henbane-seede & the like weight of white poppie seedes & an ounce of conserve of red roses into a stiff electuarie & take the quantity of a nutmeg or walnutt thereof.

Against spitting & vomitting blood.

Take the juice of 12 handfulls of plantaine leaves a convenient quantity of fine sug{ar} six ounces of fresh cumfrey rootes well beaten together.

<21r>

How to make excellent good writing Ink.

A quart of or Raine water, or strong beare wort. |  claret, or white wine

Galls, if 45 ounces, then Copperice 43 ounces.

Gum Arabick 3 Ounces

Ising glasse 2 penny worth.

Mingle these together & let it stand nine days stirring it once a day. & then make use of it.

One spoonfull of bay salt will keepe it from {moulding} & one glasse of sack from freezing.

Let noe small dust of Galls or copperice bee put into the inke for that doth clogge the penn in writing.

<22r>

The Dragons head revolves once in 6798 days; or 18yeares 223days. & through {illeg} moues in 556days 12 howers. through a degree in 18 days 21h: 12m:. Every day moveing 3min 10" 38''' 39'''' 30'''''. Every yeare 9degrees 20'. 32''. If the moone be past her node ascendant her latitude is North if past the her latitude is south. To know her latitude by her distance from observe this rule.

[Editorial Note 5]
<27v>

A vowell is turned to u when the {bre{ath} passes difficultly} {illeg} the lipps. u turnes to b by shutting the lipps & b to m by opening the nose.

A vowell is turned to ð = ð when the breath is straitned twixt the toung end & teeth ð turnes to d if the toung & teeth close & d to n by opening the nose.

A vowell is turned to ʒ when the breath is straitned twixt the middle of the tounge & rough of the mouth so that it vibrate 'gainst the teeth) ʒ turnes to g by closeing the middle of the tongue & palate & g to צ by opening the nose

The quavering or jarring of toungs end against the fore parte of palate changeth a vowell into r, that quavering ceasing r turns to z (that breath {vibrating} against the teeth which passeth by the {toungs} end), z is turned to l if the tongues end & palate close & the breath so passe by the tounge sides as to vibrate against the cheekes.

v, b, ð, d, ʒ, g, z, are changed into

f, p, θ, t, ש, k, s, by stopping the sound of the Larinx.

h signifies breathing

ה signifies the breath straitned in the throte.

<28r>

Loving ffreind

It is commonly reported that you are sick. Truly I am sorry for that. But I am much more sorry that you got your sicknesse (for that they say too) by drinking too much. I ernestly desire you first to repent of your haveing beene drunk & then to seeke to recover your health. And if it pleas God that you ever bee well againe then have a care to live heathfully & soberly for time to come. This will bee very well pleasing to all your freinds & especially to

Your very loving freind

I. N.

Luvin ffrend

It iz komonloy ripωωrted ðat yw ar sik. Triuli Oy am sori for ðat. But Oy am mutש mωωr sori ðat yw got {yur} siknes (for that ðee see tu) boy driצkin tu mutש. Oy ernestloy dizoir yw furst tω ripent of yur heviצ byn druצk and ðen tω syk tω rikover yur helθ. And if it plijz God that yw iver by well egeen ðen heev ee kaar tω liv helθfuli & sωωberli for toim tω kum. ðis wil by veri wel pliiziצ tω ool yur frendz & ispeשali tω

Your veri luviצ frend

I. N.

<28v>
yiyea yes yet
ye{yet} yelk
yayarde
yoYorke yonder yawn
yow yoake
ywyou youth
iysheild
iefeare weare
iufew slew Eugh
eyweight hei.
eiaide
auhow out {count}
oy{toy} I {price} bite
ωyboy toy
ωuhold fould
ωwshould could
uy, ωy,wee
uiwill weigh quill
uewet way quell
uawas quarrell
uoworne what or hwat
woe word
wuwoolfe wooll.
yiyyeild
yawyowle, you or yaw.
yωwyow
uieweare
ueiweight.
uauwound
{weω}whewh whew
uoyquite why = huoy.
צkt = צt.hang't wink't
צs.things
צg.anguish
צk.think
dʒ.George
age = adʒe
judg = dʒudʒ
rdʒ.urge George
ndʒchange {hinge}
ldʒBelgia
child which switch
ksax tricks workes
הtnaught thaught
smschism
tneatn
blabl
knwakn
<29r>

The {illeg} by drawing in the {lips & contracting} the middle parts of the tonge to the rough of the mouth {illeg} the hinder parts of the throate being widned {maketh} the pronuntiation of y, being more dilated at the rough it maketh i, more still at the rough but straitned at the throate makes {E} still more straitned at the throat dilated at the rough as the lipps & chaps a little opened makes a, more still the lipps & chaps being wide open make o, more still the lipps a little thrus{t} out & contracted makes ω, more still makes u, the throate & lipps most straitnd & lipps thrust out most makes w.

Soe the greatest cavity in the mouth being first made in the throate & thence by degrees moved towards the lips further from the larin{x} (like the stopping the holes of a pipe to sound the notes in order from G sol re ut, to Gam ut)) causes the pronunciation of the vowells in this order y i e a o ω u w

The filling of a very deepe flaggon with a constant streame of beere or water sounds the vowells in this order w, u, ω, o, a, e, i, y.

<30r>
ythee fede feild these wee see feele
iithe weigh sea seiz heate meere ease
eethey way say hate end health faint {main} faile
aaand mare care
oosaw fall morne hawke fault naught
ωωso more foale to note before most though both mourne oate those oake
uufoole too looke foode come wood love some
wshould = showld. would, wooll. wood
iis this hit mist fill
efell men fed
aas man that mast, fallow
ofor not lost folly God
ωfurre frogg dogg turne furrow
uluck full but lust must thus good summe

To the labialls may be added the jarring of the lips caused by shutting the lips & then forceing the breath through them p✱ow. To gutturalls add the (Welsh) jarring of the throte as when wee force up fflegme both which correspond to . & ה the breathing through the throte straitned . as gh in though = thouה naught rough

m.
b.
p.
v = bh.voyce have
f = ph.Pharo of for
n.
d.
t.
ð = dh.the tith ð
θ = th.hath think
z.zeale is
s.cell sell ice us
r.
l.
צ.thing = thiצ strong
g.
k.can. kill quiet or kuiet. luck
ʒ = zh, or gh.grasier = graʒer
ש = sh, or kh.shew ash nation = naשon.
<31r>

The abc may bee distinguished into single & combined letters. & the singles into vowells & semivowells.

3a:{and}, that, tare
2e.men, maine, hath, lament, faint, may.
1i.is, ease this, these, {illeg} the heate2, hit.
4o.folly, fall, for, fault, morne, hawke
5u.to both {mourne} turne scourge furrow. {luck look}2 {illeg}4 {illeg}5 {illeg}6 {luck}7 {should}3
6
r.
l.able or abl.
n.{illeg} writtn
m.{happen} {illeg}. scism.
ng = צ {illeg}
s,
z.
t,
d.
l,
b.
k,
g.
f, = ph,
v.
θ,θεὸς, thinke
th.the, that.
sh,shall. or {שal}
✱.joy or d✱oy. grasier or gra✱er.
j = dsh, or rather jzd✱
ch = tsh.child or tshild
y = iyou or {eou}
q = k
x = ks
orc = k, or s.
w = u or {οὐ}.
h
<32r>

The severall things contained under those generall heads.

Artes, Trades, & Sciences.
Chap 1.

A

Apothecary.

Ailewife.

Architect.

Archer.

Arithmetitian.

Artificer.

Armourer.

Astrologer.

Astronomer.

B.

Baker.

Baily.

Barber.

Beggar.

Bellfounder.

Boateman.

Bookebinder.

{Bowyer}.

Brewster.

Broker.

Butcher

Butler

Belman.

Bonesetter.

C

Carpenter.

Carrier.

Chandler.

Chirurgion.

Coachman.

Cobler.

Comedian.

Cooke.

Cooper.

Cryer.

Clarke.

Cupbearer.

Currier.

Clothier.

Confectioner.

D.

Dier.

Divine.

Doctor.

Draper.

Drugster

<32v>

E

Engineer.

ff.

ffalconer.

ffarrier.

ffeatherman

ffencer.

ffidler.

ffisher.

ffowler.

G.

Gardiner.

Gelder.

Glasner.

Goateheard.

Goaler.

Goldsmith.

Grasier.

Grocer.

Grosier.

Glover.

H.

Habberdasher

Hangman.

{Ha}rper.

{Hat}ter

Heardsman

Historian.

Holster.

Horserider.

Hurster.

Huntsman

Husbandman

Hostis

I.

Ieaster.

Ieweller.

Inkeeper

Ioyner.

Iron maker | monger

K.

Knitter

L

Labourer.

Lawyer.

Limner.

Logitian.

M.

Mariner.

Mason.

Mathematitian

Maultster.

Mearchant.

Mercer

Midwife.

Milner.

Millright.

Minister.

Minter

Master.

Mower.

Musitian.

N.

Negromancer.

Neateheard.

O

Ostler.

Organist.

P.

Painter.

Papermaker.

Pedler.

Perfumer

Philosopher.

Phisitian.

Pilott.

Piper.

Plowman.

Potter.

Preacher.

Printer.

Pumpright.

Q.

Querister.

<33r>

R.

Reaper.

Rider.

Roper.

Ringer.

S.

Scavenger.

Schoolemaster.

Scrivener.

Seaman.

Seamster.

Seargeant.

Searvingman.

Searvant.

Secretarie.

Sheepeheard.

Shooemaker.

Sivemaker.

Slater.

Smith

Sophister.

Souldier.

Sower.

Stageplayer.

Swineheard.

T.

Tayler.

Thresher.

Tinker.

Tradesman.

Turner.

Tragedian

V.

Vsurer.

W.

Waterman.

Weaver.

Wheleright.

Y.

Yeoman.

Birdes.
Chap: 2.

vide Nomenclaturam, pag: 37.

<33v>

Beasts.
Chap: 3:

vide Nomenclaturam pag: 39.

Cloathes.
Chap: 4.

A.

Apparrell.

Apron

B.

Band

Bibb.

Bonegrace.

Boote.

Bracelet

Buskin.

Button

Breeches.

Broadcloth:

C.

Callico.

Capp.

Canvase

Cassock.

Cambrick.

Chaine.

Cloake.

Cloth.

Coate.

Coife

Cotton.

Coller.

Crosscloth

Claspe.

Cuffe.

D.

Diaper.

Doublett.

Drawers.

Dressing.

E.

Eare-ring

ff.

ffustian.

ffan.

foreheadcloth

facecloth.

G.

Garment.

Girdle.

Glove

Gowne.

Garter.

Gallome.

H.

Hairelace.

Handkercheif

Hairecloth.

Hangingsleeve

<34r>

Hardes.

Hatt.

Hatband.

Hempe.

Holland.

Hood.

Hem.

I.

Iackett.

Iarsie.

K.

Kercheife.

Keeper.

Kneestrings.

L.

Lace.

Lawne.

Lineings

Linning.

Latchett.

M.

Maske.

Mufler.

N

Neckcloth.

Neckjewell.

P.

Packcloth.

Petticoate.

Perriwigg

Pillioncloth.

Pinner

Pinn.

Pockett.

Point.

Purple.

Phillet

R.

Raile.

Rideingcloths

Riblings.

S.

Sackcloth.

Scarfe.

Scarlett.

Sailecloth.

Scotchcloth.

Sattaine.

Shirt

Shoo

Shoostring.

Silke.

Skirt

Sleeve

Slipper.

Smock.

Spangle.

Spur.

Socks.

Sole.

Stomacher.

Stockins.

Stuff

Surplice.

Strip.

Seame

Selvige.

Scollop.

Searge.

T

Tiffany

Tagg.

V

Velvet

W.

Wastcoate.

Wastband.

Whiske.

Windowcloth.

Woollen.

Wooll.

Y.

Yarne.

<34v>

Of a Church.
Chap 5

A.

Alley.

Alter.

Anthem.

Almes.

Appostell.

frie.
chamber.
Bellframe.
rope.
wheele.

Benediction.

Bible.

Bier.

Bishop

Bread.

C.

Chanter.

Chappell.

Chancell.

Chapter.

Chimes.

Church

warden
Churchyard
porch

Circumcission

Coffin

Communion

Congregation

Confession

Clock.

Consecration.

Crockett.

Cup.

Ceremony.

D.

Deacon.

Deprecation.

Deske.

Doore.

E.

Elder.

Epitaph.

Evangelist.

Eucharist.

ff.

ffunerall.

ffranckincence

ffont.

G.

Godfather
mother

Gospell.

Grave

Gravestone.

H.

Harpe.

Hearse.

Hymn.

I.

Image.

Imprecacon

Intercession

L.

Leades.

Library.

Liturgie.

Lute.

M.

Monument.

Musick.

<35r>

O

Organ.

Olliers.

P.

Passover

Pew

Pillar

Pinacle.

Petition

Praier.

Preacher.

Priest.

Prophett.

Prophesie.

Psalme.

Psalterie.

Pulpit.

Q.

Querister.

Quire.

R.

Reader.

S.

Sacrament.

Sacrifice.

Scaupehouse.

Screene.

Scriptures.

Scutcheon.

Seate.

Sermon.

Singing.

Singingman.

Song.

Sprinkling.

Staires.

Statue.

Steeple.

T.

Table.

Temple.

Testament

Tune.

Thanksgiveing

V.

{illeg}

W

Water.

Washing

Weathercock.

Wine.

Witnesse.

Of Diseases.
Chap. 6.

A.

Ach.

Accident.

Affliction.

Ague.

Amazednesse

Angnaile

Anguish.

Apoplexie.

Apothecarie

B.

Bald.

Balme.

Balsome.

Bedrid.

Belching.

<35v>

Battleham'd.

Bile.

Bite.

Blaunders.

Bleamish.

Bleeding.

Bleareyed.

Blind.

Blister.

Bloodyflux.

{Bloodyfallsse}

Bloodshot.

Blubberlipd

Blow.

Brokenhead.

Bruise.

Burne.

Burstennesse.

C.

Chafe.

Catarre

Chincough.

Chirurgeon.

Choller.

Canker.

Clister.

Coare

Cold

Collick.

Consumption

Convulsion.

Corruption

Costivenes

Cough.

Cramp.

Crookednes.

Crusht.

Crumpfooted.

Cut.

D.

{illeg}

Dizziness.

Doteage.

Dropsie

Dumb

Drowsines.

E.

ff.

ffainting.

ffallingsicknes.

ffarcie.

ffeaver.

ffistulaw.

ffit.

fflegm.

ffoolishnes.

ffreckle.

ffrenchpox

ffrensie.

<36r>

G.

Garget.

Galdness.

Gobbertooth.

Gorbellied.

Gore-blood.

Gout

Gangreene.

Greatnosed.

Greife.

Grones.

Ground-Ague

Gunshott.

H.

Hard skin.

Headach.

Helvering.

Hicketts.

Hives.

I.

Iaundise.

Imposthume.

Ioinach.

Ioultheaded

Itching.

K.

Kernell.

Kingsevell.

L.

Lameness.

Leprosie.

Lethargie

Lalk

Letting blood

Lisping

{illeg}

M.

Madnesse.

Mangie.

Maimed.

Matter.

Meagroin.

Mezels.

Melancholly.

Mother.

Murrion

N.

Nolimetangere

Numnesse.

O

Oneeyed.

{Onion}

P.

Paine.

Paleness.

Palsie.

Pearle.

<36v>

Phisick.

Phisitian.

Plaister.

Pleurisie.

Plague.

Pimples.

Polipus.

Poysoning

Pestilence

Prick.

Purge.

Purblinde.

Phlebotomie

Purples.

Push.

Q.

Quinsie.

R.

Relaps.

Rheume

Ringworme

Rottenness

Race.

Runing of the raines.

Running.

S.

Salve

Sadness.

Saddleback

Scab.

Scarr.

Scald.

Scaldhead.

Screaching.

Scurfe.

Scurvie.

Shingles.

Sigh.

Sinnewsprung

Scratt

Skin.

{Sobbs.}

{illeg}

Sqinsie

Squinteyed

Small pox

Spleene.

Sting.

Straine.

Stunted.

Sturdie.

Stich.

Stroke.

Stammering

Surfeit

Swinepox

Swouning.

Spaving

Starknes.

T

{Tailevil}.

Tetterworm

Tissick

Tooth-ach

Toothless

Tympany

<37r>

V.

Venome.

Vomit.

Vncome.

W.

Wart.

Wen.

Whitlaw

Windy.

Wolfe.

Wood-evill.

Wormes.

Wound.

Y:

Yellows

Of the Elements.
Chap. 7.

A

Aer: Astræa

Allum.

Ashes.

Aequinoctiall line.

Aries.

Aquarius.

Aldebran.

Antares.

Aeolus.

Apollo.

Aesculapius.

Aurora.

Aglaia.

B.

Brightness.

Brand.

Burning.

Baie.

Banke.

Bridge.

Brooke.

Bath.

Bucket.

Bulwarke.

Beare.star

Bulls eye.

Biquintile.

Bacchus.

Bellona.

C.

Cloud.

Coale.

Constellation

Clay

Chalke.

Cliffe.

Cartrut.

Candle.

Casons.

Channell.

Cock.

Conduit.

Comet.

Canter.

Capricorne.

Conjunction.

Castor.

Cupid.

Ceres

Calliope.

Clio.

D.

Depth.

Drop.

Deluge.

Darknesse.

Dew.

Damm.

Drowning.

Dogstar.

Diana.

<37v>

E.

Embers.

Eclips.

East.

Eastwind.

Earth.

Earthquake.

Euphrosyne.

Erato.

Euterpe.

ff.

ffire.

fflame.

fflash.

ffirebrand.

ffountaine.

ffrost.

ffewell.

ffurnace.

ffeild.

fflore.

fford.

ffen.

fflood.

ffirmament

ffaunus

G.

Gravell.

God

Goddesse.

Grove.

H.

Hemisphære

Heaven.

House.

Harth.

Heate

Heath.

Horizon.

Haire.

Hill.

Hamadruades.

Hebe.

I.

Ire

Icicle

Inclosure.

Iupiter.

Iuno.

K

L

Light.

Lightning.

Lake.

Lamp.

Land

Laine

Leo.

Libra

Luna.

Lucifer.

Lionsheart
Taile

Lucina.

M

Marsh.

Mist

Moone.

Moore.

Mountaine.

Marl.

Moistnes.

Morter.

Mars.

Mercury.

Minerva.

Muses.

Mespomene

N.

North.

Northwind.

Neptune

Naiades.

Nemesis.

<38r>

O.

Ocean.

Opposition.

Oreades

Pan.

Pallas

Pond.

Poole.

Path.

Pipe.

Pudgell.

Pump.

Plannet.

Pole.

Pisces.

Procion.

Plaine.

Pollux.

Palæmon

Priapus

Pluto

Proserpina.

Plutus.

Polyhymnia.

Q.

Quarter.

Quartile.

Quintile.

Quincunx.

R.

Raine.

Rainebow.

River.

Rivulett.

Raie.

Rock

Rackride.

Rundlet.

S.

Sand.

Seaweed.

Sea.

Scorching.

Sedge.

Skie.

Shore

Signes.

Sunn.

Shallow.

Smoake.

Soote.

Sparke.

South.

Southwind.

Storme.

Snow.

Shower

Shineing.

Splendor.

Spring.

Starr.

Scorpio.

Sagittarius.

Saturne.

Sol.

Seavenstar{s}

Septentrionalis

Syrius

Sceat.

Sextile.

Semisextile

Swiming

Silvanus.

Silenus

Suadela.

T

Tempest.

Thunder.

Thunderbolte.

Torch.

Turfe.

Taurus.

Tridecile.

Trine.

Thetis.

Tithonus.

Thalia

Terpsichore.

V.

Valley.

Venus.

Virgo.

Virgins-spick

Vulcan

Vesta.

Vrania.

<38v>

W.

Warmth.

{Woort}.

Waxe.

Whirlepoole.

West.

Westwind.

Wind.

Weather.

Whirlewind

Way.

Well.

Welldrag.

Wetting.

Z.

Zodiack.

Zone.

Of ffishes.
Chap: 8.

vide Nomenclaturam. pag 43 quibus addantur

<39r>

Of Hearbs & Weedes. & fflowers.
Chap: 9.

A.

Artichoke.

Annise.

Angellico.

B.

Bearefoote.

Broome.

Bugles.

Burriage.

Bettonie.

Berrys.

Burdock.

Butterdock.

Bud.

C.

Carrot.

Cabbidge.

Coleworts.

Colleflowre.

Cucumber.

Cummin.

Camomoile.

Coltsfoot.

Couslep.

Curnation.

Chickingweed.

Crocus.

Crowflower.

Cockle.

Crowneedles.

Cullobine.

Chesfartt.

Collender.

D.

Dill.

DrunkenIohn.

Daisie.

Dock.

Darnell.

Dogberries.

Downs.

Daneweede.

Dragontree.

E.

Emmanie.

ff.

ffennell.

fferne.

ffinkell.

fflower.

fflowerdeluce.

<39v>

G.

Garlick.

Gilliflower.

Gilliver.

Greenesauce.

Grass.

H.

Hearbe.

Hearbagrass.

Hemlock.

Hempe.

Herbanimal

Henbaine.

Housleeke.

Hyssop.

I

Iuice

K

Kock.

L.

Lavender.

Leaves.

Leeke.

Lillie.

Londonpride.

Lettice.

M.

Majoram.

Mallows.

Madnip.

Marrigold.

Maules.

Mercury.

Mellon.

Mint.

Moly

Monkhood.

Mugwort.

Mustard.

Muttoncomber.

Mushroome.

Moss.

N.

Nettle.

O.

Onion.

P.

Parsly.

Parsnip.

Piannett.

Pinkiney.

Periwinkle.

Pilling.

Pith.

Poppie.

Primerose

Pumpion.

Q

<40r>

R.

Radish.

Restberrys.

Roote.

Rose.

Rosemarie.

Ruberbe.

Rue.

S.

Sage.

Savory

Sedge.

Sallet.

Sive.

Seedes

Saffron

Sorrell.

Sperage.

Spinage

Spurnes.

Smalledge.

Sheepheards-purse.

Stalke.

Strawberry.

Sparagoose.

T.

Tansie

Thyme

Tulipp

Turnipp.

Time

Thistle.

Treefold.

Topps.

V.

Verdigrass.

Violett.

W.

Watercresses.

Wormwood.

Woodsorrell.

Woodbine.

Weede.

Y

Yarrow.

Yellowberrys

Of a House & Housald-stuffe.
Chap: 10.

A.

Arch.

Andiron.

Applechamber

B

Building.

Barr.

Brick.

<40v>

Back-doore.

Bolt.

Beame.

Board.

Bake-house

Bench.

Box.

Baskett.

Butt.

Barrell.

Bunghole.

Beesome.

Bellowes.

Bed.

Blankett.

Bolster.

Bedticke.

Bodkin.

Boghouse.

Belconey.

Broach

Buttery.

Boule.

Buttercupps.

Bottle

Bagg.

Brush.

C

Cottage

Chalke.

Corner.

Chinke.

Casement.

Cellar.

Chamber.

Closet.

Chaire.

Cushion.

Carpet.

Cupboard.

Cloth.

Chest.

Coffer.

Cabbinett.

Case.

Corke.

Chimney.

Couldron.

Chafing-dish.

Colander.

Craddle.

Cannopie.

Coverlet.

Curtaine.

Chamber-pot

Close-stoole.

Candle-stick.

Candle.

Comb.

Curling-iron.

Crickett.

Cobiron.

Curtainerod
ring

Castle.

Cockloft.

Churme.

Charger

Cockinhole

<41r>

D

Door.

Dineing- roome.

Deske.

Dripping.

Dripping-pan

Dresser.

Dish.

Dichclout

Distaffe.

Drawer.

Darne.

Dearie.

E.

Eaves.

Extinguisher.

ff.

ffoundation.

ffoire-doore.

ffolding-doores.

ffurniture.

fframe.

fflasket.

ffoot-stoole.

ffornace.

ffryingpan.

ffleshhooke.

ffireshovell.

fforme.

ffosset.

fflint.

ffeatherbed.

ffaines

ffloore.

G.

Gate.

Glasse.

Gallery.

Garrett.

Guttertile

Grate.

Grater.

Gridiron.

Glascase.

Gallowtree.

H.

House.

Harbour.

Hinge.

Hall.

Hingle.

Hand-baskett.

Hampier.

Hogshead.

Hangings.

Harth.

Hooke.

I.

Inn.

Iacke.

Iaume.

Ioystree.

K

Knocker.

Key.

<41v>

Kitchin.

Kettle.

Kneadingtrough.

Kimnell.

Kitt.

L.

Latch.

Lock.

Lintell.

Lattice.

Lath.

Larder.

Library.

Lumber.

Lid

Ladle.

Lamp.

Lanthorne.

Looking-glass.

Lime

M.

Mortar.

Match.

Matt.

Mashfatt.

N.

Naile.

Needle.-Eye.

Napkin.

O.

Oven.-stone

P.

Pallace.

Porch.

Penthouse.

Post.

Prop.

Pillar.

Pavement.

Parlour.

Press.

Pannier.

Pipe.

Piercer.

Pott.

Pann.

Pestell.

Pipkin.

Pillow.

Pallett.

Pixie.

Pin.

Paile.

Panchion.

Pothooke.

Pillowbeer.

Plate.

Pottinger.

Plaister.

Partition.

Papillion.

Potlid

Platter.

Q.

Quarrell.

<42r>

R.

Rubbish.

Ridg

Roofe.

Rafter.

Rundlett.

Rack.

Rug.

Rock.

Reele.

Reccons.

Ridgtree.

S.

Stone.

Slate.

Staires.

Study.

Scaffold.

Spittle.

Seeling.

Stoole.

Seate.

Spiggot.

Soote.

Spit.

Sparr.

Skillet.

Strainer.

Sponge.

Sheete.

Snuff.

Snuffers.

Spindle

Sheeres.

Spectacles.

Swillingtub.

Shelfe.

Skep.

Stroome.

Steele.

Stanchill.

Spoole.

Sissers.

Saveall.

Smothingiron

Spoone.

Sneck.

Shutt.

Scure.

Storehouse.

Story.

Sinke.

Saucer.

T.

Threshold.

Tower.

Tile.

Taverne.

Table.-cloth

Trunke.

Tub.

Tap.

Tostingiron.

Trivett.

Tinderbox.

Tinder.

Tapestry.

Torch.

Thimble.

Trey.

Till.

Turning whee{le}

Trencher.-rac{k}

<42v>

Tostingiron.

Trason.

Thatch.

Turret.

Tent.

Trunke.

V.

Victualling-house.

Vtensills.

Vassell.

W.

Wall.

Wickett.

Window.

Warehouse.

Workehouse.

Washing-tub.

Wyck.

Waxtaper.

Wheele.-band.

Watertable.

Wattle.

Of Husbandry
Chap 11.

A

Arable-land.

Apel-tree.

Aune.

B

Beane

Breadcorne

Barly

Baily.

Blade.

Beard of an eare

Barne.

Barnefloore.

Beame.

Bey.

Bullockhouse

Bolt.

Beetle.

Band.

C.

Close.

Commons.

Cottage.

Cock.

Cowhouse.

Cesterne.

Clay.

Creach.

Corne.

Cockle.

Crowneedles

Chaff.- house.

Chaseing-rake.

<43r>

Countrieman.

Coulter.

Carter.

Cart.

Cod.

Crib.

D.

Darnell.

Dung.

Dike.

Dunghill.

E.

Eare.

Eare- beard.

ff.

ffan.

fflaile.

fforme.

ffeild.

ffurrow.

ffallow.

ffurlong.

fforke.

fflower.

ffeme.

ffreehold.

G.

Geere

Gate.

Grass.

Greenesward.

Grownd.

Goade.

Granarie.

Graine.

H.

Husbandman.

Hay.

Harvest.

Hayloft

Harrow.

Huske.

Heath.

Hovell.

Hedge.

Hairecloth.

Headstall.

Husbandry.

Hurdle.

Hatchet

Hopper.

Horscoller.

I.

Inclosure.

<43v>

K.

Kilne.

L.

Lintell.

Land.

Liveing.

Lathe.

Leape.

M.

Mower.

Manner.

Murk.

Meale.

Mault

Maulthouse.

Moulter.

Muckhill.

Mucforke.

Manger.

Meadow.

N.

Neepe.

O.

Oates.

P.

Pease.

Pulse.

Prop.

beame
share
Plowhandle
iron.
man.
staff

Pasture.

Pailes.

Pin

Pickforke.

Prop.

Philler.

Q

Quornes.

R.

Rake.

Roll.

Rent.

Riddle.

Ryer.

Raile.

Rack.

Rice

Rie.

Ridge.

Reaper.

Reapinghook

S.

Sand.

Sive.

Shakforke.

Shovell.

Swinecoat

Stable.

Steepfat

Stack.

Stall.

Stake.

Swingletree.

Sack.

Staddle.

Swath.

Sith.

Sickle

Sleade.

<44r>

Stouke.

Sower.

Seede.

Sheafe.

Shock.

Stubble.

Spoke.

Straw.

Shale.

Shelbard

T.

Tares.

Thresher.

Turfe.

Tenant.

Tillage.

Teather.

Teame.

Trey.

Thong.

Trough.

V.

Vetches.

W.

Waine.

Wheele.

Windowcloth.

lash.
Whipstock.
cord.

Wheate.

Windrow.

Wong.

Y.

Yarde.

Yate

Yoake.

Instruments & things belonging to Artes.
Chap: 12.

A.

Act.

All.

Addition.

Anchor.

Anglerod.

Anvill.

Armes.

Arrow.

Aspect.

Ax.

B.

Back.

Backpeice.

Bag

Bagpipe

Base

<44v>

Bason.

Bandileere.

Beetle.

Bellows.

Ball.

Barr.

Barrow.

Beame.

Belt.

Bitt.

Boate.

Bolt.

Bow.

Box.

Blade.

Breastplate.

Brush.

Bullet.

Bushell.

C.

Cambrell.

Cannon.

Carbine.

Charger.

Chaine.

Chauder.

Cheekes.

Chissell.

Cipher.

Citterne.

Club.

Coller

Colours.

Conserve.

Counter.

Cornett.

Coach.

Crosbow.

Colter.

Cymball.

Cliff

Cable

Cleever.

Comedy.

D.

Deck.

Divission.

Dramme.

Dreggs.

Drum.

Druggs.

Donatist.

E.

Edge.

Ell.

Elson.

ff.

ffauchion.

ffeather.

ffidle.

ffidlestick.

ffigure.

ffile.

ffoote

ffrumesaw.

ffurlong.

ffurnace.

ffatt.

G.

Galland.

Gam-ut.

Garth.

Giginiron.

Gill.

Gimblet.

<45r>

Glasse.

Gouge.

Glasing-wheel.

Grist.

Grindle-stone

Gun.

H

Hammer

Halter.

Harpe.

Harpsicalls.

Hatches.

Hatchett.

Harrow.

Headpiece.

Hedge.

Hem.

Hide.

Headstall.

Hooke.

Hoope.

Hardle.

I.

Inch.

Ingill

Ingraver.

Instrument.

Inke.

Iuice.

K.

Knife.

K

L.

Lance.

League

Leese.

Letter.

Line

Loome.

Lute.

Leape

M.

Mallet.

Manger.

Marble.

Marke.

Mast.

Mattock.

Maukin.

Measure.

Mile.

Mill.

Millstone.

Mould.

Multiplicacon

Musick.

Muskett.

N.

Naile

Needle.

Neepe.

Net.

Note.

Number.

Numeration.

<45v>

O.

Oare.

Ordinance.

Organs.

Oven.

Ounce.

Oyle.

P

Paine.

Paper.

Parchment.

Patterne

Peck.

Peice.

Pen

Penknife.

Pensill.

Pickax.

Pike.

Pile.

Pint

Pistell.

Plaine.

Plaister.

Play.

Plummett.

Point.

Pottle

Pouder.

Pound.

Poule.

Preserve.

Prick.

Prow.

Pike.

Q.

Quarrell.

Quart.

Quarter

Quill.

R.

Rack.

Raile.

Raiser.

Rapier.

Riddle.

Rock.

Rod.

Rope.

Rule.

S.

Sackbutt.

Saddle.

Saile.

Saw.

Scales.

Scene.

Screw.

Seame.

Shaume.

Sheares.

Shittle.

Sheafe.

Slute.

Ship.

Snare.

Song

Spade.

Spattula.

Spirit.

Spring.

Square.

Stall.

Sterne

Still.

Stick.

Stop

Stiddy.

Strike.

<46r>

Stirrup.

Stone.

Switch.

Sword.

Substraction

Syrrup.

T.

Tachetend.

Tenour.

Thimble

Thisle.

Thred.

Toole

Tragedy.

Trapp.

Trebble.

Trowell.

Trumpett

Tune.

Turningframe

V.

Violl.

Virginalls.

W.

Waggon.

Wall.

Wedge.

Web.

Weight.

Wheelbarrow

Whetstone.

Whip.

Whistle.

Wimble.

Wheele.

Y.

Yard.

Of Kindred, & Titles.
Chap. 13.

A.

Ancestors.

Adulterer.

Arabian.

Addamite

Ammonite.

Ammorite

Armenian

Assyrian.

Arrian.

Antichrist.

Anabaptist

Appostle.

Alderman.

Admirall.

Asian

Affrican.

American.

Aunt.

Affinity.

Aerian.

Atheist.

Apostate.

<46v>

B

Batchelours.

Groome.
Brideman
maid.
chamber.

Brother.

Bastard.

Barron.

Blaspheimer.

Brawler.

Babler.

Babylonian

Bishop.

Brittaine.

Bedlam.

Beggar.

Brownist.

Benjamite.

C.

Consanguinity

Child.

Cousin.

Countryman.

Commonwealths'-man

Cheater

Cutpurse.

Cuckhold.

Caldean.

Carmelite

Cardinall

Christian

Clarke.

Cavileer.

Conduct.

Chancelour.

Constable.

Churchwarden.

Collonell.

Captaine.

Corporall.

Curate.

Canaanite.

Calvinist.

Celestianan.

D.

Daughter.

Duke.

Drunkard.

Debtor.

Dane.

Deacon.

Deane.

Doctor

Divine.

Duch-man.

Donatist.

E.

Espousalls.

Earle.

Esquire.

English-man

Egiptian.

Essæan.

Episcopall man

Ensigne.

Emporour.

Epicure.

ff.

ffather.

ffornicator.

fflatterer.

ffrenchman.

fflorentine

ffrier

ffellow.

ffellowcommoner

<47r>

G.

Grandfather
mother
Great-grandfather
mother

Generation.

Geneallogie.

Gentleman.

Gentile.

German.

Gaule.

Grecian.

Gibbeonite

Gallilæan.

Generall.

Goaler.

Gipsie.

Gargasite

H.

Husband.

Heir.

Heathen.

Hebrew.

Hivite.

Hittite.

Hungarian.

Hunn.

Hermit.

Hypocrite.

Hollander.

Herauld.

Heretyck.

I.

Ioint-heire

Inheritance.

Iade.

Idolater.

Infidell.

Iew.

Israelite.

Irishman

Itallion.

Iebusite.

Independent

Iustice.

Iudge

Iesuite.

K

Kindred.

King

Knight-bannaret

Knight.

Knave.

L.

Lyar.

Loyterer.

Lumbard.

Levite.

Lecturer.

Lieutenant.

<47v>

M.

Marriage.

Mother.

Marquesse.

Manslayer.

Madman.

Master

Midianite.

Moabite.

Muscovite.

Master of arts.

Moderator.

Maior.

Major.

Minister.

Malefactor.

Martyr.

Musketeer.

Murderer.

Magistrate

{Messalian}.

Monk.

Manichæan

N.

Nephew.

Nunn.

Neece.

Novatian.

O.

Orphan.

Offender.

Overseer.

Origenist.

P.

Portion.

Posteritie.

Prince.

Protestor.

Peasant.

Pirate.

Pagan.

Polonian.

Perasite.

Pict.

Persian.

Pope.

Preist.

Papist.

Protestant.

Pharisie.

Philistine.

Puritan.

Presbyter.

Prebune.

Pupill.

Pensioner.

Prævadicator.

Procter.

Parents.

Post-Master.

Pikeman

Prisoner.

Patriarch.

Pelagian.

Priscilianist.

Q.

Quaker.

Quarreller

Quarter-Master

<48r>

R.

Rogue.

Robber.

Ranter.

Reveller.

Rascald.

Roman.

Roundhead.

Rector.

S.

Son

Sister.

Subject.

Sluggard.

Swearer.

Sabbath breaker

Slave.

Sinner.

Searvant.

Scold.

Scoffer.

Scot.

Swisser.

Spaniard.

Sarazen.

Saxon.

Scythian.

Shuhite.

Sadducie.

Sophister.

Siser.

Schollar.

Speaker.

Sessor.

Statesman.

Seducer.

Seutor.

Sweetheart

Sheriff

Schismatick.

Stoick.

Sceptick.

Sodomite.

T.

Twins.

Theife.

Turke.

Tartarian.

Trojan.

Tutor.

Tasker

Traytor.

V

Virgin.

Vncle.

Vicount.

Villaine.

Venetian.

Viceroy.

Vmbra.

Viccar.

W.

Wife.

Wedlock.

<48v>

Wooer

Widdow

Widdower.

Whoore.

Welshman.

Witch.

Wiseman.

Wizard.

Wretch.

Y.

Yeoman.

Of Man, his Affections, & Sences.
Chap 14.

A

Arterie.

Apple of the Eye.

Arme.

Armehole.

Ankle.

Art.

Admiration.

Anger.

Amity

Affection.

A

B.

Body.

Bone.

Beard.

Breath.

Breast.

Bosome

Back.

Backbone.

Belly.

Buttock.

Braine

Blood

Bowells

Bladder.

Black.

Browne.

Blew.

Boldness.

Bashfullness.

Bitterness.

Blushing.

C.

Crowne.

Corner of the Eye

Cheeke.

Countenance.

Chapp.

Chin.

Calfe of the Leg.

Choller.

Caull.

Color.

Confidence.

Compassion

Courtesie.

Civility.

Certainty.

Collerbone.

Carriage.

Cogitation

Consideration

Complex.

D.

Dreame.

Doubting.

Dispaire

<49r>

Distrust.

Desire.

Dread.

Displeasure

Discourtesie

Discreadit

Discourse.

E.

Eare.

Eiebrow.
lid.

Elbow.

Envie.

Error.

Enmity.

Entrales.

ff.

fflesh.

ffat.

fforehead.

ffate.

ffist

ffinger.

fflegm.

fforgetfulnes.

ffaith.

ffeare.

ffidelity

ffoolishness.

ffavour.

ffreindship.

ffashion.

G.

Gumms.

Gullet.

Gall.

Graie

Greene.

Gristle.

Gutts.

Greife.

Gladness.

.

H

Head.

Haire.

Hand.

Huckle-bone.

Hipp.

Ham.

Heele.

Heart.

Hearing

Hatred.

Hope.

Heaviness.

Humanity.

I.

Iaw.

Ioint.

Ignorance.

Iudgment.

Ioy

Iollaity.

Ire.

Impudence.

Imprudence

Irrationallity

Infidellity.

<49v>

Idlenesse.

Imagination

.

.

K

Knuckle.

Knee.

Kidnies.

Knowledge.

L

Leaneness.

Lip.

Loine.

Leg.

Lungs.

Liver.

Laughter.

Love.

Loathing.

Lock of haire.

M.

Member.

Marrow.

Muscle.

Mouth.

Memory.

Mind.

Mistakeing.

Merry.

Mallice.

Modesty.

Manners.

Midriff.

Meditation.

Mirth.

Mourning.

N.

Nose.

Nostrills.

Neck.

Naile

Navell.

Nipple

O

Opinion.

P.

Poores.

Pap.

Phansie.

Paileness.

Prudence.

Pleasure.

Puddings.

Pitty.

Passion.

Presumption

{Phisiognomy}

.

R.

Rib.

Red.

Russet.

Rellish.

Reason.

Remembrance

Rejoysing.

S.

Soule

Skin.

Sinew.

Snot.

Spittle.

Shoulder.

Shoulderblade

<50r>

Span.

Side.

Shin

Stomack.

Spleene.

Sight.

Smell.

Sweete.

Stinke.

Sower.

Sharpe.

Sound.

Sigh.

Sleepe.

Snorting.

Suspition.

Sadness.

Shame.

Sorrow.

Subtilness.

Slumber

Sobing.

Speaking

Sole of the foot

.

.

.

T.

Temples.

Tooth.

Tongue.

Throate.

Thumb.

Thigh.

Toe.

Tast.

Touch.

Trust.

Talking.

V.

Voyce

Veine.

Vrin.

Visage.

Vse.

W.

White of the Eye.

Wrist.

White.

Wisdom.

Will.

Witt.

Wrinkle.

Wondering.

Wan.

Wrath.

Wish

Wakeing.

Y.

Yellow.

Of Meate & Drink.
Chap: 15

A

Applepie.

Aileberry

Ale.

B.

Bread.

<50v>

Butter.

Beefe.

Bacon.

Boild
Baktmeate
Broild

Bagpudding.

Blackpudding.

Biskett.

Bunn.

Bevis.

Braune.

Breakefast.

Beaver.

Breast.

Brisket

Buttock.

Brisketdraught.

Buttock-rand.

Brewer.

Beer.

Beaker.

Bowle.

Bottle.

Bason.

Buttercupps

{Butteredasie}

Bottled beere.

Banquett

C.

Caterer.

Cloth.

Crust.

Crumb.

Carver.

Creame.

Chese.

Carbonadoed
meat.

Cake.

Custard.

Cheescake.

Chitterling

Caper

Chive.

Cheeke.

Cheslip.

Caudle.

Chalice.

Cup.

China aile.

D.

Dish.

Dinner.

Draugh.

Drinke.

Dreggs

Dietdrink.

E.

Ewer.

Egg.

ff.

ffood.

fflesh.

ffried meate.

ffritter.

fflitch.

ffeast.

<51r>

fflorentine

ffat.

ffeete.

ffoole.

fflagon.

G.

Gammon.

Guest.

Glass.

Gristle.

Gruel.

Grease.

H.

Heart.

Hastletts

Honey.

Hopps.

I.

Ioint.

Iugg.

Ioule.

K

Knife.

L.

Loafe.

Lamb.

Leane.

Leaven.

Leatherstaves.

Loine.

Leg.

Liver.

Lightes.

Ladle

M.

Morsell.

Mess.

Meate.

Milke

Mutton.

Mincemeate.

Manchet.

Meale.

Mouspeice.

Manna.

Merribouke.

Marrow.

Mustard.

Metheglin.

N

Napkin.

O.

Oile.

Olive.

<51v>

P.

Pottinger.

Pottage.

Porke.

Pudding.

Pancake.

Pie.

Pastie.

Pig.

Packwax.

{Pettitoc}.

Pluck.

Plate.

Posset

Pickle.

Pot.

Perrie.

Q.

R.

Roast meat.

Rand.

Rack

Rib.

S.

Sallett.

Saltsellar.

Salt

Spoone.

Syllibub.

Stuedmeate.

Sawsage.

Sewett.

Sauce.

Sweetmeats.

Supper.

Souse.

Skin.

Seame.

Sap.

Strunt.

Supersedens.

T

Table.

Tablecloth.

Towell.

Trencher.

Tart.

Towell

Toothpick.

Tallow.

Tost.

V.

Veal.

Vinegar.

Vdder.

Victualls.

W.

Watergruell.

Wafer.

White of an Egg

<52r>

Wine.

Wormewood-ale

Y.

Yolke of an Eg

Of Mineralls.
Chap: 16.

A

Amethist.

Agate.

Adamant.

Angell.

B.

Brass.

Bezarstone.

Berill.

C

Copper.

Corrall.

Cornerstone.

Carbuncle

Crystall.

Cornalline.

Cornix.

Coales.

Cogles.

Coyne.

Crowne.

D.

Digger.

Diamond.

Doller.

E

Emrald.

ff.

ffreestone

fflint.

fflab.

ffarthing.

G

Gold.

Grindstone

Groate.

H.

Halfpenny.

Halfcrowne.

I.

Iron.

Iewell.

Iasper.

Iacinth.

<52v>

L.

Leade.

Loadestone.

Ligure.

M.

Metall.

Mines.

Marble.

Milstone.

Money.

Marke.

N.

Noble.

O.

Oare.

Onix.

P.

Pitt.

Pebble.

Pearle.

Penny.

Pound.

Peice.

Q.

Quicksiver.

R.

Red leade.

Rubie.

S.

Silver.

Steele.

Sowder.

Stone.

Stonepit.

Sardius.

Saphire.

Slate.

Shilling.

T.

Tin

Touchstone.

Topaz.

Teaster.

W.

Whiteleade.

Whetstone.

[1] X

[2] X

[3] X

[4] X

[5] X

[6] X

[7] X

[8] X

[9] X

[10] X

[11] X

[12] Editorial Note: This Note Empty

[13] X

[14] X

[15] Editorial Note: This Note Empty

[16] X

[Editorial Note 1] Apart from the title and the first five words of the the text, the rest of this page, including the marginal note, is written in Thomas Shelton's shorthand notation: it was deciphered by R.S. Westfall in 'Short Writing and the State of Newton's Conscience', Notes and Records of the Royal Society 18 (1963), 10-16.

[17] Write the words on a piece of paper and let the party grieved bear it about with him.

[Editorial Note 2] Two astronomical charts are here omitted.

[Editorial Note 3] A series of astronomical charts is here omitted.

[Editorial Note 4] Further astronomical charts on f. 14v and the the top of f. 15r are here omitted.

[Editorial Note 5] There follows a three-page astrological table on ff. 22r-23v and a sequence of very complex algebraic equations on ff. 24r-26v which are here omitted; f. 27r is blank.

© 2017 The Newton Project

Professor Rob Iliffe
Director, AHRC Newton Papers Project

Scott Mandelbrote,
Fellow & Perne librarian, Peterhouse, Cambridge

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL - newtonproject@history.ox.ac.uk

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