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176.

"Memoriall about Mint Money"

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: T 1/37.57, National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: MINT00922

177.

"Dr Newton's Oath as Warden of the Mint"

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: T 1/37.53, National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: MINT00921

178.

Fragment on early Church government

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.10, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00360

179.

Passage on early Christian sects

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.9, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00359

180.

Passage on the faith Christ taught the disciples

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.8, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00358

181.

Part of a study of Revelation

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.7, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00357

182.

A fragment on the worship due to God from man

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.6, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00356

183.

Fragment on Revelation

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.5, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00355

184.

Fragment on the Nazarenes

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.4, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00354

185.

Part 2 of a passage on Church history

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.3, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00353

186.

Part 1 of a passage on Church history

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.2, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00352

187.

'Of the Religion of the Iews & Christians'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL255.1, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00351

188.

'The Question stated about abstaining from blood'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: SL232, Location Unknown

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00124

189.

Suppressed preface to the Historia cœlestis britannica

Author: John Flamsteed

Source: RGO Ms. 1/32C, ff. 74-93, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: OTHE00033

190.

Copy of the petition of seven bishops against James II's policy of tolerance toward Roman Catholics [1688]

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: R.16.38A1, Trinity College Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00120

191.

'A letter of the Reverend Father Peter Iesuite'

Author: Unknown

Source: R.16.38. 442, Trinity College Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00103

192.

'Ex Marci Maximi Cæsaraugustani in Hispanijs Episcopi Chronico'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: R.16.38. 438A, Trinity College Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00102

193.

Notes from Ralph Cudworth on Plutarch and the 'Persian or Zoroastrian trinity'

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: R.16.38. 436A, Trinity College Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: THEM00101

194.

Trinity College Notebook

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: R.4.48c, Trinity College Library, Cambridge, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: PERS00001

195.

Miscellaneous alchemical notes and recipes

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: QD14.N498, Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00202

196.

Draft alchemical treatise or compilation.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1070 A, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00084

197.

Two accounts of alchemical operations (1690s?).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1041 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00083

198.

Three related sets of notes (late 1680s-90s).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1032 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00082

199.

Two incomplete treatises on the vegetative growth of metals and minerals

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1031 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00081

200.

'Notanda Chymica' (late 1660s).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1028 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00080

[1]

Signed by the Mint Board.

[2]

Printed in NC, 4: 202-3.

[3]

Printed in NC, 4: 201-2.

[4] 1 p.

[5]

in English

[6] SL255 Passage on early Christian sects [SL255.9]

[7] A passage (beginning missing) on the true faith of early Christians.

[8] 4 pp. on 2 ff.

[9]

in English, Latin and Greek

[10] Fragment on early Church government [SL255.10] SL255 Passage on the faith Christ taught the disciples [SL255.8]

[11] 2 pp. on 2 ff.

[12]

in English

[13] Passage on early Christian sects [SL255.9] SL255 Part of a study of Revelation [SL255.7]

[14] Paragraphs 5-9 (9 is incomplete) of a study of Revelation.

[15] 2 pp. on 2 ff.

[16]

in English

[17] Passage on the faith Christ taught the disciples [SL255.8] SL255 A fragment on the worship due to God from man [SL255.6]

[18] 1 p.

[19]

in English

[20] Part of a study of Revelation [SL255.7] SL255 Fragment on Revelation [SL255.5]

[21] 1 p.

[22]

in English

[23] A fragment on the worship due to God from man [SL255.6] SL255 Fragment on the Nazarenes [SL255.4]

[24] 1 p.

[25]

in English and Latin

[26] Fragment on Revelation [SL255.5] SL255 Part 2 of a passage on Church history [SL255.3]

[27]

The second half (ff. 3-4) of a passage (incomplete at the end) on Church history, the corruption of the faith and the Nicene Council. The first half of the passage is SL255.2.

A marginal reference on f. 4r to an edition of Athanasius's works published (according to Newton) at Paris in 1699 gives a terminus a quo for the date of this section. However, the edition Newton had in mind is surely the works of Athanasius, edited by Bernard de Montfaucon, published at Paris in 1698.

[28] 2 ff.

[29]

in English with some Latin and Greek

[30] Fragment on the Nazarenes [SL255.4] SL255 Part 1 of a passage on Church history [SL255.2]

[31] The first surviving half of a passage (incomplete at the beginning) on Church history, the corruption of the faith and the Nicene Council. The second half of the passage is SL255.3.

[32] 2 ff.

[33]

in English with some Latin

[34] Part 2 of a passage on Church history [SL255.3] SL255 'Of the Religion of the Iews & Christians' [SL255.1]

[35] 2 pp. on 1 f.

[36]

in English

[37] Part 1 of a passage on Church history [SL255.2] SL255

[38]

A discussion in Newton's somewhat rambling late style about Jewish dietary laws and the extent to which they remain in force for Christians. Newton comes to no firm conclusion about the matter, but commends kosher slaughter for being comparatively humane. Avoiding cruelty to animals was, at least in later life, a topic close to Newton's heart, as is attested by many anecdotes about him and by his own writings (e.g. Keynes Mss. 3 and 9).

[39] 2½ pp. + 1 p. blank

[40]

in English

[41]

Ostensibly an account of the genesis of the book, but in fact largely given over to a bitter and highly personal attack by the former Astronomer Royal on Newton, who according to Flamsteed bullied him, interfered with his work, took his data by force and used it without acknowledgment.

[42] 22 pp.

[43]

in English

[44]

The last page of the document is bound out of sequence as f. 37, though it is clearly intended to follow f. 93.

[45] 1 p.

[46]

The third leaf is in Humphrey Newton's hand.

[47]

Full title reads: 'A letter of ye Rnd ffather Peter Iesuite, Almoner to ye King of England written to ye Rnd Father le Chaise Confessor to ye most Christian King [i.e. Louis XIV], touching ye present afairs of England'. The original (if the document is genuine) dates from early 1688, having reference to the pregnancy of Queen Mary Beatrice and the introduction of the Jesuit Thomas Fairfax to Magdalen College (9 Jan. 1688). However, the document depicts the Jesuits as so thoroughly devious and scheming that it seems unlikely it was really written by a member of the order. It concerns the progress of James II's efforts to Roman Catholicise England.

[48] 6 pp. on 3 ff.

[49]

in English (presumably translated)

[50]

A chronological list of major events in the fifth and sixth centuries, relating chiefly to the rise and fall of Arianism.

[51] 2 pp.

[52]

in Latin

[53]

Notes taken from Ralph Cudworth's True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678) on ancient ideas about the Trinity.

[54]

See also Clark Library Ms. fN563Z and H1330-31 for Newton's own copies of Plutarch (the Cudworth volume was apparently not from his own library).

[55]

Taken from Ralph Cudworth's True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678), pp. 287 and 290.

[56] 1 p.

[57]

in English with quotations in Greek

[58]

Newton's undergraduate accounts book, giving a fascinating insight into his lifestyle as a student. Though generally frugal, he records occasional indulgences: beer and wine, a visit to the tennis court, and a surprisingly large outlay on cherries. The notebook also reveals that he was operating a money-lending operation for his fellow students.

[59]

See Brewster (1855), 1: 17-18.

[60]

Contains Newton's expense accounts from 19 March 1659 (i.e. 1660?) through his early years at Cambridge.

On the cover: a fragment in shorthand. Inscribed on the first page: 'Quisquis in hunc librum teneros conjecit ocellos./ Nomen subscriptum perlegat ipse meum./ Isaac Newton. Martij 19 1659.' pp. 3-38 consist of a guide to Latin pronunciation headed 'Vtilissimvm prosodiae svpplementvm'. Then follow 13 pp. of personal expenses under the headiings 'Impensa Propria' and 'Otiose & frustra expensa'.

[61] 50pp.

[62]

in Latin and English

[63]

The notebook has been written from both ends: the expenses listed on pp. i-xii are written from the back of the book, the remaining pages from the front. The expenses are here placed first as they are much the most interesting part of the document.

[64]

Folio 2 of the Latin textbook appears to have been bound out of sequence; it clearly belongs between folios 8 and 9, and is placed there in the transcription.

[65]

f. 1 originally belonged to SL18 and ff. 2 and 3 to SL88. The whereabouts of the rest of these lots remains unknown.

[66]

f. 1r: Notes in English under the headings 'Ruth Mallor's work' and 'The 3d period', c. 300 words.

f. 1v: Recipes in English for 'a menstruum wch will dissolve gold' and 'a menstruum for resolving bodies like ye Alkahest but not so potent', c. 80 words.

f. 2r: Notes headed 'Experimentum Bellinj', in Latin in an unidentified hand, c. 80 words.

f. 3v: Notes headed 'Aqua fortis' and 'Refining silver', in English in John Conduitt's hand, c. 250 words, with a sketch of the apparatus used for refining silver.

[67] 4pp. on 3 ff.

[68]

in English and Latin

[69]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 107; also H994-1001 for Newton's Lull collection. Bernoulli's letter printed in Brewster (1855), 2: 437-8.

[70]

Largely drawn, with page references, from various other works, principally those of Lull and 'Philalethes' but also Ripley, Snyders, Flamel, Sendivogius, Fabré, Arnoldus de Villanova, Van Helmont and others. Clearly represents an attempt to establish a sequence of operations: 'Opus primum', 'Opus secundum', etc. (cf. Keynes Mss. 40, 41 and Babson Ms. 421); the operations covered here are numbered 1-2 and 6-9). Very rough, heavily reworked draft, several sections incomplete.

Also includes three scraps of unrelated correspondence (1700, 1718, n.d.) and a transcript (in another hand, annotated by Newton) of Bernoulli's letter of 8 April 1717 to Montmort, in French, concerning Newton and Leibniz. These are unmentioned in the rather cursory Sotheby catalogue description of SL66, which gives the total page count as 43 pp.; some or all of the letters are presumably a later addition, though why they have been catalogued together with the foregoing treatise is a mystery.

[71] 42 pp. + 4 pp. of unrelated material.

[72]

in Latin with odd passages in English

[73]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[74]

1) 'Separatio Elementorum' (2 pp.). On the distillation of elements in a 20 gallon vat, with references to 'Philalethes' and Albertus Magnus. The large number of corrections and relatively small number of references to other writers may indicate that this is at least partly Newton's own composition.

2) 'Reductio et Sublimatio' (5 pp.). Excerpts and abstracts, principally from Lull, on an imperfect transmutation of white sulphur into silver and red sulphur into gold.

[75] 7 pp.

[76]

in Latin

[77]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106-7 and 'Newton's Copy of "Secrets Reveal'd"', 159.

[78]

Entitled 'The Regimen' (7 pp.), 'The Regimen', (8 pp.) and 'Of ye Regimen' (2 pp., incomplete). Describe a sequence of (al)chemical operations largely drawn from the works of 'Philalethes', though other authors including Pontanus, Maier and Roger Bacon are cited, especially in the second set of notes. On the loose scrap (which is not mentioned in the Sotheby catalogue, though the manuscript is described as 18 pp. and the catalogue does not normally count blank pages), various alchemical references, with mention of John Day and of Roger Bacon's Elementorum and Michael Maier's Arcana arcanissima, written over and on the reverse of a receipt dated 11 September 1689.

[79] 8 pp. badly discoloured and barely legible.

[80]

in English

[81]

Both texts are related to the 'Hypothesis explaining the Properties of Light' Newton sent to the Royal Society in December 1675.

Reproduced in facsimile as an appendix to B.J.T. Dobbs, Alchemical Death. The English portion is described and transcribed in Dobbs, Janus Faces, 256-70 (Dobbs treats the first of the twelve subjects for enquiry as the title of the entire document). See also her 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 107, and P.M. Rattansi, 'Newton's Alchemical Studies'.

[82]

The first treatise (11 pp., in English) begins with a list of 12 numbered subjects for discussion, forming a putative draft outline of the work (though the text itself frequently departs from the sequence of subjects listed): e.g. '1 Of natures obvious laws & processes in vegetation', '2 That metalls vegetate after the same laws', etc. The very heavy reworking of the main text and absence of reference to other sources strongly suggest Newton's own composition, making this a centrally important document indicating the nature of his 'chymical' views in the mid-1670s. It is quite without accounts of specific laboratory processes and quite devoid of allegorical or symbolic terminology, and seems to represent the beginnings of an attempt to formulate a coherent and comprehensive theory of chemistry.

The second, shorter treatise is in Latin and written from the back of the document, beginning on f. 6v and continuing onto f. 6r. This is a distinct but closely related work also shedding important light on Newton's chymical and natural philosophical views, though until recently it has been almost wholly neglected by Newton scholars.

[83] 12 pp.

[84]

in English and Latin

[85]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[86]

Notes and extracts, with page references, chiefly from Michael Maier's Arcana arcanissima, though there is also reference to the 'Rosarium Philosophorum' from Zetzner's Theatrum Chemicum.

[87] 5 pp. (though there is only one word and a page reference on p. 5).

[88]

in Latin

© 2020 The Newton Project

Professor Rob Iliffe
Director, AHRC Newton Papers Project

Scott Mandelbrote,
Fellow & Perne librarian, Peterhouse, Cambridge

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL - newtonproject@history.ox.ac.uk

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