Catalogue Entry: OTHE00027

Chapter 10: 'These Learned Lives.'

Author: David Boyd Haycock

Source: William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England (2002).

[Normalized Text] [Diplomatic Text]

[1] Anon., A letter to Eusebia: Occasioned by Mr Toland's Letters to Serena (1704) p. 21, p. 23. Attribution in British Library catalogue.

[2] John Ward to Stukeley, 5 February 1752, British Library Add. MSS 6269 ff. 235-42.

[3] Popkin (1990a) 28; Warburton (1742) p. x.

[4] St John (1752) Vol. I pp. 6-7.

[5] Ibid. p. 9, p. 71. St John observed that in the Old Testament one found 'extracts of genealogies, not genealogies; extracts of histories, not histories' (p. 102). Nevertheless, in his 1716 essay 'Reflections upon Exile' Bolingbroke did refer to Grotius' argument of the ancient peopling of America with approval.

[6] Zythophil, BL Add. MSS 6269 ff. 161-178.

[7] Ibid. f. 176.

[8] Gough (1762) p. 60. Stukeley actually admitted in a manuscript of 1739 'that this method of analogizing between sacred & profane history, has been carryed too far, by some learned men', and that some of their comparisons seemed 'subtle' or 'far-fetcht'. Like Zythophil, he criticized the French bishop Pierre Daniel Huet (Huetius) (1630-1721), whose works were published in translation as A Treatise of the Situation of Paradise (1694) and The History of the Commerce and Navigations of the Ancients (1717). Nevertheless, he still considered Bochart, Vossius and Gale's methodology to be a 'commendable branch of knowledge.' Wellcome MS 4724 f. 3.

[9] Gough (1768) preface.

[10] Nichols (1782) pp. 62-56.

[11] Ledwich (1785), p. 305.

[12] Ibid. p. 307.

[13] Ibid. p. 319.

[14] Ibid. p. 320.

[15] Ibid. p. 322.

[16] Burnett Vol. II pp. 530-1, quoted in Cannon (1991) p. 25.

[17] Quoted in Cannon (1991), p. 31.

[18] See Lamb and Mitchell (1991) 'Introduction' pp. 1-8.

[19] Jones (1799), p. 229.

[20] Ibid. pp. 229-30.

[21] Owen (1962), p. 84.

[22] Gough (1785), pp. xiv--xv.

[23] Burrow, 'A Proof that the Hindoos had the Binomial Theorem', in Asiatick Researches: Comprising History and Antiquities, The Arts, Sciences and Literature of Asia Vol. 2 (New Delhi, 1979) pp. 388-9. Burrow added that he was working on a 'treatise on the principles of Hindoo Astronomy' which would show that 'they were acquainted with a differential method similar to Newton's', but he died before this was ever published.

[24] Maurice (1796), p. vi.

[25] Jones (1799), p. 28; Maurice (1796), pp. vii and 65.

[26] Maurice (1797), pp. 166, 241.

[27] Ibid. 17-8.

[28] Maria Graham, Journal of a Residence in India (2nd edition, London 1813), pp. 168-9.

[29] Marshall and Williams (1982) p. 115.

[30] Bryant (1775-76) Vol. I pp. xi--xiii.

[31] Ibid. Vol. III p. 533; also p. 537.

[32] Ibid. pp. 600-1.

[33] Jones, 'The Third Anniversary Discourse, Delivered 2d February, 1786, by the President', in Asiatic Researches, Volume 1 (New Delhi, 1979) p. 343. Jones added that 'the least satisfactory part' of Bryant's book 'seems to be that which relates to the derivation of words from Asiatic languages.'

[34] Jones (1799) p. 274.

[35] Erasmus Darwin, The Temple of Nature; Or, The Origin of Society: A Poem, with Philosophical Notes (London, 1803), p. 5.

[36] David Hume, Letters to William Strahan (Oxford, 1888), p. 155.

[37] Warburton, 'Remarks on Mr David Hume's Essay on the Natural History of Religion' (1777), quoted in Tweyman (1996) p. 237.

[38] The Monthly Review 16 (1757), quoted in Tweyman (1996) pp. 207-8.

[39] Tweyman (1996) p. 229.

[40] Ibid. p. 232.

[41] Ibid. p. 233.

[42] King (1799) Preface p. iii.

[43] Ibid. Preface pp. iv--v.

[44] Ibid. p. 171; p. 166.

[45] Ibid. p. 161.

[46] See Ackroyd (1996), pp. 37-39, 43-55.

[47] Blake, Jerusalem (1804-18), quoted in Smiles (1994), p. 93.

[48] Davies (1804) p. 119.

[49] Owen (1962) p. 211. It is impossible to cover here all the publications pertaining to the Druids in the nineteenth century, and I refer the reader to Owen and Smiles's books.

[50] Hoare (1812) p. 7.

[51] Ibid. pp. 140-2.

[52] Ibid. pp. 172-3.

[53] Ibid. pp. 65-7.

[54] See Ucko et al (1991) pp. 177-83 for a discussion on the question of the date and duration of the destruction of the Avebury stones.

[55] DNB.

[56] Higgins (1827) p. 230.

[57] Gentleman's' Magazine 119/2 (November 1849) p. 483, in an anonymous review of Algernon Herbert's Cyclops Christianus.

[58] Bowles (1828) p. 62.

[59] Ibid. pp. 22, 26.

[60] James (1836) p. 26.

[61] Ibid. p. 28.

[62] Ibid. p. 33.

[63] Deane (1834) pp. vii--x.

[64] Ibid. p. 375.

[65] Ibid. p. 277.

[66] Ibid. p. 229.

[67] Long (1858) pp. 323-4.

[68] Duke (1846) pp. 2-6.

[69] Ibid. p. 6.

[70] Ibid. p. 16.

[71] Ibid. pp. 18, 27.

[72] Ibid. p. 43.

[73] Ibid. p. 56.

[74] Ibid. p. 55.

[75] Browne (1823) p. 6.

[76] Ibid. p. 37.

[77] Ibid. Preface p. x.

[78] Ibid. pp. 130-6.

[79] Ibid. p. 40.

[80] Ibid. p. 77 and pp. 79-80.

[81] Rickman (1840) p. 401.

[82] Herbert (1849) p. 104.

[83] British Quarterly Review (July 1860) p. 204. It is Long (1876) p. 101 who attributes this anonymous article to Fergusson.

[84] Ibid. pp. 206-12.

[85] Fergusson (1872) pp. 15-6, quoted in Ucko et al (1991) p. 251.

[86] Ibid. p. 89, quoted in ibid.

[87] Lubbock to Herschel, 17 January 1866, Royal Society MSS HS 11.356 and 11.357

[88] Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 f. 84.

[89] Ross (1860) p. 224.

[90] Ibid. p. 244.

[91] Ibid. p. 92.

[92] Ibid. pp. 93-4.

[93] Ibid. p. 97.

[94] Ibid. p. 120.

[95] Ibid. p. 272.

[96] Ibid. p. 268.

[97] British Quarterly Review (October 1869) pp. 413-20.

[98] Pitt-Rivers (1889) p. 8.

[99] Lubbock (1865) p. 55.

[100] Ibid. pp. 473-4.

[101] Lubbock cited as his source an essay by Alfred Russel Wallace, the co-discoverer of the theory of natural selection, titled 'The Origin of Human Races and the Antiquity of Man Deduced from the Theory of Natural Selection', published in Anthropological Review in May 1864.

[102] Lubbock (1865) pp. 478, 491. Lubbock's assumption is clearly wrong. The Egyptian pyramids or Easter Island statues were evidence enough that technological skills could be lost over time.

[103] Ibid. p. 488.

[104] Ibid. pp. 487-8.

[105] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (1), unpaginated endnotes.

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