Newton Project: Transcription and Tagging Guidelines (Version 7)

by
John T. Young

with a lot of help from Michael Hawkins and Yvonne Martin-Portugues
and thanks to Linda Cross, Raquel Delgado-Moreira for proofreading and constructive criticism

updated 1 September 2019

Introduction

These guidelines should be read in conjunction with the accompanying Element set. The Document Structure and Text sections provide a transcription policy and a broad outline of which tags to use where, while the Element Set gives specific details of what exactly is required or permitted in each element and where it may (or may not) be used. It is (or at least aims to be) a plain English version of the Newton Project schema.

I have done my best to keep jargon to a minimum, but have assumed familiarity with certain key XML terms and the means of representing them: principally element (and the distinction between empty and non-empty elements), entity, attribute and attribute value. It is essential that transcribers are entirely clear about these terms, and understand the principle of nesting elements. These terms are not difficult to grasp and are explained in any guide to XML - though a good place to start if you are new to the language is the ‘Gentle introduction to XML’ on the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) website. Throughout this document, I use the term ‘text string’ to mean ‘any quantity of continuous text’: this may be a single letter within a word, a whole word, a sentence, five-and-a-half words, ten paragraphs or whatever. Element tags are referred to with their angle brackets on and empty element tags with their forward slash (e.g. <pb>). Non-empty elements are referred to by their opening tag:‘<p>’, for instance, means the entire element <p> except where I specifically refer to ‘the opening <p> tag’.

Please pay close to attention to the rules for spacing before and after tags, particularly in regard to <add>, <del> and <lb>. These may seem pettifogging but they are there for a reason. Incorrect use of spacing will lead to serious problems with the display of your transcript.

In most cases, the instructions apply equally to the transcription and encoding of manuscript and of print material, though obviously a number of tags, such as those for deleted and inserted text, are relevant only to transcription from manuscript, since these features do not normally occur in printed texts. There are, however, a few cases where the methodology for transcription from print is different from that for transcription from manuscript: this applies mainly to the elements <anchor>, <fw>, <note>, <pb> and <teiHeader>.

There are also a few distinctions to be drawn between the encoding of early modern (17th-18th century) and modern (19th century or later) printed documents. Transcribers will not normally be asked to key in or encode modern printed documents, as draft XML versions can be automatically generated from OCR scans, but they may be called on to proofread such drafts. Preliminary XML drafts of prenineteenth-century printed texts may also be automatically generated, depending on the quality of the images we have available. In either case, it is clearly essential for transcribers and proofreaders to be aware of the variant protocols for encoding such texts. These variants are clearly flagged at the relevant points in the guidelines.

Almost all the coding now used in Newton Project markup is derived from the TEI Guidelines (version P5), but we have made certain minor and TEI-compliant restrictions and extensions to suit the particular nature of the material we are dealing with. Wherever possible, these non-compliant extensions are being replaced with pure TEI-based solutions.

Document Structure and the <teiHeader>

Each document is entirely enclosed in a so-called ‘parent element’, <TEI>. This is divided into two main component elements, <teiHeader> and <text> (always in that order). Another element, <body>, nests directly inside <text> (in theory, <text> can contain other things too, but these are not normally relevant to us). The transcription proper is wholly enclosed in the <body> element, which contains one or more <div>s, i.e. chapters, sub-chapters or other clearly defined structural divisions. The <teiHeader> is reserved for metadata: information about the source document, a record of the work that has been done on it, and the @id values of the languages and hands that feature in it and of the transcribers and checkers who have worked on it. Thus every document has this outline:

<TEI> <teiHeader/> <text> <body> <div/> <div/> <div/> <!--there may be any number of <gi>div</gi>s bar zero; there may be <gi>div</gi>s within <gi>div</gi>s if necessary--> </body> </text> </TEI>

Unless given special instruction, transcribers do not need to concern themselves about most aspects of the <teiHeader>. You will be given a template header to get you started and the editors will modify the fields as necessary after you have completed your transcript. The only part of the <teiHeader> that we do need you to fill in is the final section, <revisionDesc>, which contains a series of <change> elements recording the dates between which various stages of the transcription process took place. It follows this format:

<revisionDesc> <change when="2008-03-24"><name>John Young</name> began tagged transcription</change> <change when="2008-04-19"><name>John Young</name> completed tagged transcription</change> <change when="2009-04-20"><name>Michael Hawkins</name> began checking against microfilm</change> <change when="2009-05-01"><name>Michael Hawkins</name> finished checking</change> </revisionDesc>

Simply enter the relevant dates as the when values of <change>, using the yyyy-mm-dd format as above, your name as the content of <name> and a brief account of the work you have begun or completed as the content of <change>.

NB: Keeping an exact account of the dates on which the various stages of processing a document are started and completed is very important because each upgrade of the tagging policy means that previous mark-up also has to be upgraded to bring it into line with the new dispensation. This process can be largely automated, but only if we have a record of what policy was being followed in the first place. If this is not clear, the whole thing has to be proofread again from scratch. It also provides an easy way of verifying which is the latest version of a given document if any confusion arises in the back-up system.

The Text

a) General

1) The golden rule is: ‘If in doubt, say so’. Admitting to being confused or uncertain at any point is no shame at all. Being confused or uncertain and not admitting it merits boiling in oil. Please do not hesitate to contact an editor if at all unsure what to do at any point, however trivial the issue may seem.

2) All such doubts, if not resolved by personal communication, should be expressed in a <!-- -->, which can also be used for any comments or queries you want to make about the text. The comment appears between the two double-dashes, and may contain pretty well anything apart from another double-dash (single dashes are OK). It should be preceded by a capitalised category indicator from the following list:

  • <!-- TODO JY/MJH/NP -->: problem requiring action by John Young/Mike Hawkins/unspecified Newton Project member
  • <!-- TRANSC -->: to comment on any difficulties or oddities associated with the transcription or tagging
  • <!-- CODIC -->: to comment on codicological features of the manuscript that are not covered by the Guidelines as they stand
  • <!-- APP -->: comments that may be useful to the editors when producing an editorial apparatus
  • <!-- OTHER -->: anything else

See the Element Set for examples of how to use these. Transcribers are strongly urged to make liberal use of this tag.

You can put a <!-- --> anywhere at all in the text, but not inside the actual opening/closing tag itself: e.g.

<add place="marginRight" indicator="no"><!--TRANSC well, I think this is an <add> but perhaps we should call it <note> - jy-->according to Ierome</add> is fine; so is

<add place="marginRight" indicator="no">according to Ierome</add><!-- TRANSC well, I think this is an <add> but perhaps we should call it <note> - jy-->

Note that the <!-- --> should come slap bang next to whatever it comments on, with no whitespace in between. Think of it as invisible (because it will be to the user), so the spacing should be exactly as it would be if it were not there.

3) Punctuation and spelling (including mistakes) should be transcribed exactly as they appear in the original. Obvious errors, however, should be placed in a <choice> tag with the faulty version in <sic> and the corrected version in <corr>, e.g.

<choice><sic>superstion</sic><corr>superstition</corr></choice>

But there is no need to tag or comment on perfectly normal 17/18-century spellings such as ‘beleive’, ‘reccon’, ‘apostacy’, or standard early modern Latin that looks ‘wrong’ to a classicist, such as ‘authoritas’ (which a classicist would spell ‘auctoritas’). If uncertain as to whether an odd-looking spelling is a mistake or just an old form, say so in a <!--TRANSC -->.

4) Capitalisation should follow the original as far as possible, but there are times when it is very hard to say whether or not an initial letter is capitalised. Letters such as C and S, which do not necessarily much change their form between capital and lowercase, are particularly tricky. My suspicion is that half the time Newton himself would not have known or cared which case he was using. This is one instance where we can to some extent be guided by the sense - all other things being equal, ‘Christ’ and ‘cow’ seem likelier than ‘christ’ and ‘Cow’, and ‘Spiritus Sanctus’ and ‘seven’ likelier than ‘spiritus sanctus’ and ‘Seven’. But this has to be to some extent a subjective decision. Again, you can hedge your bets by using a !--TRANSC --.

Transcribe initial ‘ff’ (which functions as a modern capital ‘F’) as the element ‘&ff;’.

Neither Newton nor the majority of his contemporaries distinguish in manuscript between capital I and J, or between capital U and V, so as a general rule, transcribe ‘Iesus’, ‘Iewes’, ‘Iames’, ‘Vnlesse’, ‘Vnction’, etc.[1] But if you are dealing with a printed work or you come across a hand that does make a distinction, obviously you should follow suit, so long as you are sure the distinction really is there on the page and not just in your mind. Newton does, however, distinguish between lower-case i and j, and between u and v, and again we should follow him rather than modernise/standardise in instances such as ‘Petavij’, ‘ijsdem’, or the use of ‘j’ as the Roman numeral for ‘1’.

5) Record the use of brevigraphs (i.e. conventional symbols denoting a particular letter or series of letters, such as overlining, tails meaning ‘us’ or ‘ue’ in Latin passages, crossed ‘p’s meaning ‘per’, ‘par’, ‘pre’ or ‘pro’ and the like) by using the <orig> and <reg> tags as explained in the Element Set.

6) Other conventional abbreviations (in Newton’s case these nearly always involve the use of superscripted letters) should be transcribed exactly as they appear in the original. Place the abbreviated form in <abbr> and the expanded version in <expan>, and nest both in a <choice> element, e.g.

  • for ‘yr’ - ‘<choice><abbr>y<hi rend="superscript">r</hi></abbr><expan>your</expan></choice>
  • for ‘Sr’ - ‘<choice><abbr>S<hi rend="superscript">r</hi></abbr><expan>Sir</expan></choice>
  • for ‘Bp’ - ‘<choice><abbr>B<hi rend="superscript">p</hi></abbr><expan>Bishop</expan></choice>

Common abbreviations such as the letter ‘thorn’ (y<hi rend="superscript">e</hi> for ‘the’), w<hi rend="superscript">ch</hi> for ‘which’, etc. are not included in the Entity Set as not all scribes abbreviate them in exactly the same way. File-specific entity declarations for &the;, &that;, &with;, &which;, etc., or any other abbreviations that occur frequently in a given file, may be added by transcribers (guidance will be offered if necessary on how to declare these). Conventional abbreviations that are still standard, such as ‘Dr’, ‘Mr’, ‘A.D.’ - or, in references, ‘b.’, ‘c.’ and ‘v.’ for ‘book’, ‘chapter’ and ‘verse’ - do not need to be tagged, but all others should be.

Transcribers should not attempt to expand curtailed forms of proper nouns, or any idiosyncratic abbreviations, as these are a minefield. It is often by no means obvious whether ‘Ier.’, for instance, means ‘Ierome’, ‘Ieremiah’ or ‘Ierusalem’. This is a job for the academic editors - though as ever, comment tags are welcome.

7) Catchwords, page numbers, running headers, shelfmarks and sigils are dealt with using <fw> (‘forme work’). Page numbers in manuscripts or early printed texts should appear immediately after the page break (<pb>) in the transcript, irrespective of where they actually appear on the page (this is indicated by the @place value).

No space should be left between </fw> and <pb> or between <pb> and <fw>: for instance ‘without noting any various lections in <fw type="catch" place="bottomRight">them</fw><pb xml:id="p022r" n="22r"/><fw type="pag" place="topRight">22</fw> them’.

If a catchword is incomplete, no space should be left between the component parts of the word. Otherwise, leave one space either side of the <fw/><pb/><fw/> sequence. For instance:

  • I <fw type="catch">under</fw><pb/><fw type="pag">17</fw>understand
  • I under<fw type="catch">stand</fw><pb/><fw type="pag">17</fw>stand
  • I <fw type="catch">understand</fw><pb/><fw type="pag">17</fw> understand

If a catchword is incomplete and it and/or the preceding word has a hyphen, indicate this with <lb type="hyphenated"/>. For instance:

  • I <fw type="catch">under<lb type="hyphenated"/></fw><pb/><fw type="pag">17</fw>understand
  • I under<lb type="hyphenated"/><fw type="catch">stand</fw><pb/><fw type="pag">17</fw>stand

<lb> is not otherwise needed before, after or within <fw>.

Be aware of the distinction between page break (see section b) 5 below) and page number. Page break (<pb>) indicates the physical point at which the text moves on to a new page; page number (<fw type="pag">) encodes page numbers that actually feature in the document (whether they were put there by the original writer or anyone else, and whether or not they correspond to the number assigned to that page by the transcriber/encoder).

Variant procedure for modern printed texts

In transcriptions of modern printed texts (nineteenth-century or later), <fw> is not needed at all (since there are normally no catchwords in modern texts and the page number will always be the same as the @n value of <pb>). However, transcriptions of seventeenth- or eighteenth-century printed texts should follow the protocol for manuscripts, as these often feature catchwords, and mispagination is quite common: this can be indicated by using <sic> and <corr>. For example, if p. 29 has been mispaginated as p. 92, encode it as ‘<pb xml:id="p029" n="29"/><fw type="pag" place="topRight"><choice><sic>92</sic><corr>29</corr></choice></fw>’.

8) Uncertain or conjectural readings should be tagged <unclear>, with the degree of certainty expressed in the @cert value on a scale of ‘high’ (pretty confident), ‘medium’ (doubtful) or ‘low’ (an educated guess). The reason for the uncertainty should be stated by the @reason value (see Element Set for permitted values).

Where two or more readings are plausible, group them as separate <unclear> elements nesting in <choice>. The @cert values can be used to weight the relative plausibility of the alternatives: e.g. ‘<choice><unclear cert="high">goal</unclear><unclear cert="low">goat</unclear></choice>’ means ‘I’m pretty sure this says “goal” but it might just say “goat”’, while ‘<choice><unclear cert="medium">goal</unclear><unclear cert="medium">goat</unclear></choice>’ means ‘I think this says either “goal” or “goat” but I don’t know which’.

9) Words or passages that are missing or are wholly illegible for whatever reason obviously can not be transcribed. Indicate the omission with a <gap> tag, using the @unit, @extent and @reason values to explain how much text is omitted from the transcription (if this can be ascertained) and why. If it’s possible to make a reasonable guess as to what the missing or illegible text should be, use <supplied> instead of <gap> (see section a) 10 below).

10) Material that is wholly illegible, has been omitted, or has completely disappeared from the document (usually through manuscript damage), but is at least conjecturally recoverable from the context or by reference to another version of the same text, should be tagged <supplied>. In the latter case, the source, if it is not just the transcriber’s common sense, should also be recorded as the @source value.

11) Words or passages in a language different from that of the surrounding text should be tagged <foreign> with @xml:lang values as declared in the <langUsage> section of the <teiHeader>. If such passages violate element boundaries, use successive nested <foreign> tags. <foreign> may nest within <foreign>, so if for instance there is a bit of Greek in the middle of a Latin passage in a document whose main language is English, it is tagged thus:

main English text of document <foreign xml:lang="lat">Latin interpolation with a <foreign xml:lang="gre">bit of Greek</foreign> in the middle of it</foreign> resumption of English text

Greek and Hebrew characters, Latin characters with diacritics (such as accents and cedillas), and Latin ligatures (e.g. ‘æ’, ‘œ’) should be encoded using the entities defined in the Entity Set. Greek ligatures should be silently expanded, if you know how to decipher early modern Greek ligatures. Greek and Hebrew passages, however, should only be attempted by transcribers reasonably confident of their ability to read them; otherwise just put in a ‘TODO’ comment, e.g. ‘<!--TODO NP I don't know how to read this ligature-->’; ‘<!--TODO NP five words in Hebrew-->’. If you can transcribe Hebrew, do it in sense-order. Though the Hebrew characters and words read from right to left in the original, they should be transcribed left to right, i.e. the rightmost character in the original becomes the leftmost entity in the transcription. (It comes out the right way round in the browser.) If confronted with Arabic (or any other script not covered by the Entity Set), speak to an editor.

b) Tagging for layout and spacing

All formatting, be it layout, character style, font size or whatever, has to be indicated by tags. So does whitespace (i.e. gaps of more than one space or line between individual words, characters or lines).

1) Headings, whether of the whole document or of a section within it, should be tagged <head>. The @rend value indicates whether or not they are centered. Headings are usually in a somewhat larger script than the body text, but there is no need to record this in the tags. The tag <head> should only occur at the beginning of a <div> or <lg> (line group, i.e. verse passage). Things that look like headings but do not in fact introduce new sections should be tagged <ab type="head"> (see the Element Set for details).

2) Paragraphs should each be enclosed in a <p> tag: irregular indentation of the first line is indicated by the @rend value. No @rend value is needed if the indentation is normal (i.e. the first line of the paragraph is indented by about 3-5 spaces). Do not bother recording slight variants in indentation, only ones pronounced enough to seem potentially significant, e.g. not indented at all or indented by about ten or fifteen spaces. If your document or one of its <div>s (or one of its pages) begins or ends in the middle of a paragraph, the rules of markup language dictate that you still have to tag it as though the paragraph were complete - point out the anomaly in a <!--TRANSC --> comment. If an entire paragraph is right-aligned (this is very rare), tag it as <p rend="right">. If you encounter weirder indentation such as ‘hanging indents’ (where the first line of the paragraph is not indented at all but all the subsequent ones are), simply note the issue in a <!-- TRANSC -->.

3) Line breaks in prose should be indicated by <lb>. If the line break occurs between words, place it immediately before the second word, leaving one space after the first: ‘the Visigoths reigned but <lb/>three years’ . If it occurs in the middle of a word, leave no spaces: ‘founded the king<lb/>dom of the Franks’ . Do not record line breaks in interlinear and marginal insertions or notes.

If a word is hyphenated because it has a <lb> in the middle of it, do not transcribe the hyphen (unless the hyphen is part of a compound word and would have appeared anyway, as in ‘Idol-<lb/>Temples’ - if in doubt, put in a <!--TRANSC -->). Instead, apply the attribute type with the value ‘hyphenated’, e.g. ‘Idol<lb type="hyphenated"/>atrous.

<lb> is not required at the beginning or end of a page, paragraph or line of verse, or before or after a catchword unless the catchword (or the preceding text string) is a partial word and hyphenated, in which case use <lb type="hyphenated"/>.

Line breaks that appear to have been introduced for a purpose (usually in headings where the layout can be construed as having some semantic significance) should be tagged <lb type="intentional"/> (see under <lb> in the Element Set for an example).

4) Verse passages (even if they are only one line long) should be tagged <lg> (line group) instead of <p>. The individual lines should each be enclosed in <l> (line) and do not need to be introduced by <lb>. Irregular indentation is indicated by the @rend value of <l> (as with <p>). If the poem has a heading, the whole thing (including the heading, tagged <head>) needs to be tagged as <lg>: this can have smaller line groups (stanzas) within it if necessary. Spacing around <l> is irrelevant for processing purposes, but for ease of proofing the best thing to do is to start each <l> on a new line of your transcript.

5) Page breaks (including the beginning of the first page of a document) should be indicated by <pb>. In manuscripts and early printed texts, each <pb> requires an @xml:id value which (qua @xml:id value) must be unique within the document. It also requires an @n value, not necessarily unique, which is what will actually appear on users’ screens. See the Element Set for how to assign these, and for the rules about spacing around <pb>.

Variant procedure for modern printed texts

In modern printed texts (nineteenth century or later), no @xml:id value is needed for <pb>, just an @n value.

6) In Bible references, if there is a full stop (or other punctuation mark) between chapter and verse, keep it, with no following space, e.g. ‘1 Iohn 5.7’. If there is no punctuation, leave a single space: ‘Exodus 4 6’. But if more than one verse is referenced, leave spaces between the verse numbers, e.g. ‘Dan. 6.9, 10, 11’. If uncertain about whether or not something is a Bible reference, or about what ‘chapter’ and ‘verse’ mean in Bible references, say so in a comment tag.

In non-Biblical references, you should normally leave a space after any punctuation in the original: e.g. ‘Aug. de Civ. Dei l. 3. c. 5’ - please not ‘l.3.c.5’ - this sort of mistake is very easy to overlook when proofing.

However, if you come across a case where the layout of the text makes it clear that there really is an intent on the author’s or scribe’s part to run the numbers and/or letters together, follow that intent. If in doubt, put in a comment tag.

7) Note that the only way to indicate whitespace in XML, whether horizontal or vertical, is by means of tags. The sole exception is the single space (one stroke of the spacebar). Longer spaces between words, line breaks, indentations and vertical gaps between paragraphs, etc, must all be indicated by tags. NEVER USE TABS TO INDICATE WHITESPACE.

The browser knows that line breaks are needed between paragraphs and lines of verse, and before and after headings. If a paragraph, line or heading is centered or irregularly indented, this must be indicated by the @rend value of the relevant tag ( <p>, <l> or <head>).

Any other blank spaces in the text, whether within a line of text or between two lines of text, are indicated by the <space> tag. The @dim value states whether the space is ‘horizontal’ or ‘vertical’. The extent of the blank space is given as a numerical @extent value and the type of unit being counted is specified in the @unit value (‘chars’ (characters) for horizontal space, ‘lines’ for vertical space). Note that <space> may not occur between paragraphs or between <head> and <p>, <lg> or <l>. If there is a space between a heading and a paragraph or line of verse, or between two paragraphs, treat it as the last thing in the heading or in the first of the paragraphs:

<head rend="center">An historical account of two notable corruptions of Scripture, in a Letter to a Friend.<space dim="vertical" extent="2" unit="lines"/></head> <p>Sir</p> <p>Since the discourses of some late writers ...</p>

(New College 361(4))

8) If you come up against text arranged in columns or in tabular form, ignore it for now (but let us know about it) unless given individual instruction.

c) Characters

1) Hyphens at line-breaks and carets marking insertions should be recorded in the <lb> or <add> elements. A hyphen at a line break is recorded by the @type value: ‘Baby<lb type="hyphenated"/>lon’. The presence or absence of a caret to mark an insertion is recorded by the mandatory @indicator value of <add> (as ‘yes’ if there is one or ‘no’ if there is not).

Carets that do not in fact point to anything can be ignored in the tagging, but feel free to mention them in a <!--CODIC -->. If a caret has been deleted but the insertion it points to has not, call it <indicator="yes"> and mention it in a <!--CODIC -->.

2) Special characters - that is, anything other than unaccented Roman letters, Arabic numerals (and Roman numerals provided they are also Roman letters), hyphens and these standard punctuation marks

. , ; : ? ! ' " ( ) [ ] { } / \ ~

- all have to be represented by entities (see Entity Set). Do NOT use special fonts or keyboard toggle functions for these.

  • i) Ampersands (the character ‘&’) should be represented by the entity &amp; (otherwise the browser will think they mark the beginning of an entity).
  • ii) Letters with diacritics (such as a^, e`, o", i, c,) and digraphs (or ligatures) (such as ‘æ’ and ‘Æ’) should be represented by the entities listed in the Entity Set.
  • iii) Transcribe the letter thorn (the thing looking like a ‘y’ in ‘ye’, ‘yt’, ‘ym’, etc.) as the entity &thorn;. (In practice, this will seldom arise, since the vast majority of abbreviations involving thorns can be catered for by the entities , and (see section a) 6 above). ‘yn’ has to be hand-crafted, however, as it sometimes means ‘than’ and sometimes ‘then’.) Although Newton’s thorns in fact look exactly like his ‘y’s, the letter serves a completely different function and its use is potentially of considerable interest to language historians.
  • iv) Transcribe initial ‘ff’ - which functions like a modern capital ‘F’ - as the entity &ff, for the same reason (this gives us the option of letting users choose whether to view it as ‘ff’, ‘F’ or something else again).
  • v) The various fancy characters Newton uses for note indicators or to indicate that a passage is to be inserted from elsewhere in the manuscript should be transcribed wherever they appear in the text, not edited out. They should be represented by the <newtonSymbol> tag unless they are Roman letters, Arabic numerals, or anything included in the Entity Set (in which case use letters, numerals or entities). Provide a brief natural-language description of the symbol as the @value value of <newtonSymbol> (see the Element Set for guidance in assigning values).
  • vi) Characters that appear to function merely as decorations or doodles (e.g. a series of tildes filling up the space between the end of a line of prose and the right margin) can be mentioned in a <!--CODIC --> but should not be transcribed as such.
  • vii) Greek and Hebrew characters (including Greek characters with diacritics) are dealt with in the Entity Set, but transcribers unfamiliar with Greek and/or Hebrew are free to give up at this point and throw in a <!--TODO NP -->. Greek digraphs and trigraphs should be silently expanded but can be mentioned in comment tags if the transcriber feels so inclined.

3) Do not bother noting other distinctions between letter forms, such as long and short ‘s’, Greek and Roman ‘e’, etc.

d) Formatting

1) Character formatting is indicated by <hi>, with the @rend talking a value that describes how the text appears in the original source, such as ‘italic’, superscript’, ‘underline’ and ‘doubleUnderline’.

If note or addSpan indicators (whether represented as letters, entities or <newtonSymbol>s) are placed above the line, tag them <hi rend="superscript">, unless they have obviously been added as an afterthought, in which case tag them <add place="supralinear">. If you are unable to ascertain whether something was a supralinear addition or superscripted text, put in a <!--TRANSC --> comment describing the situation.

Sometimes when Newton wants to underline a lengthy passage, he saves time and ink by underlining only the first and last line of the passage and the first few letters of each line in between. In such cases, treat the entire passage as underlined, since this is clearly the intention, but mention the fact in a <!--CODIC --> comment, e.g. ‘<!--CODIC only first and last line of this passage and first few letters of the intermediate lines underlined - lc-->’.

If underlining has itself been deleted, though the originally underlined words have not been (i.e. Newton underlined a passage and then thought better of it), treat it as not underlined but note the fact in <!--CODIC --> comment.

When transcribing printed materials (and some exceptional manuscripts), pay careful attention to the difference between uppercase text and text in small caps. To the typographically initiated, they might appear to be the same thing, but they aren’t. Small caps are smaller capital letters whose height is roughly the height of lowercase letters (strictly speaking, it should be the height of a lowercase x). Sometimes, you'll find that the initial character of a small caps word is often the same size as a normal capital letter. Compare the following: small caps, Small caps and UPPERCASE.

To encode small caps, use <hi rend="smallCaps"> and pay careful attention to the capitalisation of the text that you enter. The smaller capitals should be entered simply as lowercase characters and the normal sized captials should be entered in their capitalised forms. For example:

  • This string is in Small Caps (note the normal sized ‘T’, ‘S’ and ‘C’) would be encoded <hi rend="smallCaps">This string is in Small Caps</hi>
  • all smaller caps would be encoded <hi rend="smallCaps">all smaller caps</hi>

When the first character of a paragraph is made signficantly larger than the surrounding text and ‘dropped’ down so that it takes up two ore more lines of text, it is known as a drop cap and it should be coded with <hi rend="dropCap">.

<p><hi rend="dropCap">S</hi>Ince my last Letter I have further compared the two Telescopes, and find that of Metal to represent as well the Moon, as neerer Objects, something distincter than the other. But I must tell you also, that I am not very well assured of the goodness of that other, which I borrowed to make the Comparison; and therefore desire, that the other Experiment should be rather confided in, of reading at the distance of between a 100 and 120 foot, at which I and others could read with it in the <hi rend="italic">Transactions</hi>, as I found by measure ...</p>

Which would appear as follows:

SInce my last Letter I have further compared the two Telescopes, and find that of Metal to represent as well the Moon, as neerer Objects, something distincter than the other. But I must tell you also, that I am not very well assured of the goodness of that other, which I borrowed to make the Comparison; and therefore desire, that the other Experiment should be rather confided in, of reading at the distance of between a 100 and 120 foot, at which I and others could read with it in the Transactions, as I found by measure ...

2) A change of script by the main author or scribe, or a change of font in printed text, e.g. to bold or italic, or to significantly larger script, should also be tagged <hi> (see the Element Set for permitted @rend values). Do not bother recording slight fluctuations in the size of script, only mention them if there is a clear intent to make a particular word or phrase stand out by distinguishing it from the surrounding text.

3) A change of hand, i.e. where somebody else takes over the writing of the text, should be tagged <handShift>, with the identity of the new hand indicated as the @new value, using the codes listed in Name Codes. (NB: this is not necessary for insertions, deletions, notes or page numbers that appear in a different hand, as they are dealt with by <add>, <addSpan>, <del>, <note> and <fw>, each of which has its own @hand attribute.) When (and if) the hand or style reverts to what it was before, say so in a second <handShift> tag. For instance:

passage of text in Isaac Newton’s handwriting <handShift new="hn"/>which for some reason gets taken over by Humphrey Newton partway through <handShift new="in"/>and then reverts to Isaac’s hand again.

4) Tag interlinear and marginal insertions with <add>, provided this can nest within whatever element(s) it starts in. If it cannot, use <addSpan> (see section d) 5 below). Every <add> should have a @place value as described in the Element Set, and an @indicator value (of ‘yes’ or ‘no’) to state whether or not there is a caret or other indicator to mark the point of insertion. One <add> can nest within another if the layout of the text requires it. Do not mark up line breaks within <add>s, it will only cause confusion. If the insertion is in a different hand, indicate this using the @hand value and the appropriate Name Code. Where one text string has been replaced by another by overwriting, indicate this using <del type="over"> and <add place="over"> thus: ‘B<del type="over">y</del><add place="over" indicator="no">i</add>th<del type="over">i</del><add place="over" indicator="no">y</add>nia’ (Yahuda 15.7), meaning that Newton originally wrote ‘Bythinia’ but changed it to ‘Bithynia’ by overwriting the ‘y’ with an ‘i’ and the first ‘i’ of ‘Bythinia’ with a ‘y’.

5) Insertions from elsewhere in the text (another page, or a different part of the same page), or insertions that violate element boundaries, should be transcribed where they belong in the text, introduced by <addSpan> and terminated by an associated <anchor>. Where such insertions appear on the main body of a page, line breaks should be tagged. The physical location of the passage is indicated by the @place value of <addSpan> The procedure for assigning the @place value and for hooking up an <addSpan> to its associated <anchor> is explained under <addSpan> and <anchor> in the Element Set>. <addSpan> also has @startDescription and @endDescription values which provide, respectively, a short natural-language description of where the inserted text begins and where the main text is taken up again. These values are normally generated automatically and do not need to be entered by transcribers.

Even if the added section begins and/or ends on a different page from the main text, it should not be introduced or terminated by <pb> (the function of that tag has been taken over by the <addSpan> and <anchor> tags), but if the inserted passage itself runs to more than one page, tag the page breaks within it <pb> as normal. For instance:

<p><pb xml:id="p004r" n="4r"/>... Afric and Britain being quieted a little before. <addSpan spanTo="#addend003v-01" place="p002v p003v" startDescription="f 2v" endDescription="f 4r"/>For the history of the wars ... you may see in Iornandes mention made of an incursion of the Vandals out of Pannonia into Gallia: which Vandals, as <pb xml:id="p003v" n="3v"/> the same Iornandes relates, had been received into Pannonia by Constantine ... the wars in Italy AD 536.<anchor xml:id="addend003v-01"/> The first Trumpet begins with the Visigothic wars ...</p>

(Yahuda 1.7)

This indicates that the text before the inserted section is on f. 4r, the insertion begins on f. 2v and continues on f. 3v from ‘the same Iornandes’ to ‘the wars in Italy AD 536.’, and then the text on f. 4r is taken up again with ‘The first Trumpet begins’.

If this results in two or more <pb>s having the same @xml:id value (this is fairly unusual but it does happen), call the first one (for instance) <pb xml:id="p034v-a" n="34v"/>, the second <pb xml:id="p034v-b" n="34v"/>, and so on. It does not matter that the two @n values are identical, but all @xml:id values must be unique (qua @xml:id values) within a document.

Newton often indicates the location of such inserted passages by beginning them with a symbol such as an obelus or a dot in a circle, and placing the same symbol in the main text at the point he wants the insertion to appear at. These symbols should be recorded in the transcription, using entities or the <newtonSymbol> tag:

<pb xml:id="p014r" n="14r"/> ... by degrees they subdued it. <newtonSymbol xmlns="http://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/ns/nonTEI" value="asterisk in a circle"/><addSpan spanTo="#addend014v-01" place="p013v p014v" startDescription="f 13v" endDescription="f 14r"/> <newtonSymbol xmlns="http://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/ns/nonTEI" value="asterisk in a circle"/> The calamity of Afric in first two or three years of this invasion ...

(Yahuda 1.7)

When Newton does not include such indicators, it can be very difficult to decide where exactly a supplementary passage does belong, or, indeed, whether Newton himself was entirely sure where he wanted it to go. When in doubt, add a <!--TRANSC -->, e.g. <!--TRANSC not sure if this belongs here - jy-->. Do make sure that everything in your document gets transcribed (apart from passages you can not do and have clearly assigned to someone else in a <!--TODO -->), even if you have no idea where some of it belongs - again this can be pointed out in a <!-- -->, e.g. <!--TODO NP somebody figure out where this addSpan belongs, I can't make any sense of it - jy -->. One option in such cases, to avoid interrupting the flow of your main text, is to put the ‘orphaned’ <addSpan> passage(s) at the very end of your transcription, with the physical location of each passage noted in the @place value and an @endDescription value of ‘unknown’: it will then be down to the editors to decide where to put it in the final version.

The distinction between <addSpan> (supplementary text) and <note> (annotation) can be very difficult to draw, especially when Newton is in one of his less coherent moods. If in doubt, say so in a <!--TRANSC -->.

6) Where two or more alternative readings are placed one above another, use the <app> and <rdg> tags as described under <rdg> in the Element Set.

7) Deletions should be indicated by <del>. Distinguish four levels of deletion, using these type values: ‘blockStrikethrough’ for whole sections struck through en bloc (usually by a large cross or a diagonal line), ‘strikethrough’ for a text string crossed out with a continuous horizontal line, ‘cancelled’ for any heavier deletion than that, and ‘over’ for words or characters that have been overwritten by other words or characters (see section d) 4 above).

It is perfectly alright for one deletion to nest inside another. This makes it possible to indicate multiple revisions. For instance, in Yahuda 1.5 f. 60v, there is a passage where Newton had obviously first written ‘the Franks ... were up in arms before’, then changed that to ‘the Franks ... were in a posture of war before the rest, & that with so great force as to Conquer the Conquerors’, and then crossed almost the whole lot out and rewritten it as ‘the Franks ... were up in arms before the rest & animated with victory over the victors of the Romans’. Later still he struck out the entire passage en bloc. This yields:

<del type="blockStrikethrough">the Franks ... were <del type="strikethrough"><del type="cancelled">up</del> in a<del type="cancelled">rms before</del> posture of war before the rest, & that with so great force as to Conquer the Conquerors</del> up in arms before the rest & animated with victory over the victors of the Romans.</del>

When a deleted text string has been replaced by an inserted one, try in general to place the <add> after the <del>, thus reflecting the order in which the text was actually written, even if the caret mark (if there is one) appears, physically, before the <del>. Do not worry if this means skipping back a line to start the addition. The following is perfectly acceptable:

<del type="strikethrough">But when Alaric had <lb/>thus sufficiently derided the lost condition of the Empire he degrades <lb/>Attalus &</del> <add place="supralinear" indicator="yes">But Attalus behaving him self foolishly Alaric degrades him again &</add> restores Honorius

(Yahuda 1.7)

even though ‘But Attalus behaving him self foolishly’ is in fact written above the deleted ‘But when Alaric had’, i.e. two lines higher than where it appears in the transcript.

However, if a chunk of text has been deleted and replaced by an <addSpan> passage, transcribe the <addSpan> passage first, especially if it has an indicator located, physically, before the deleted section. And if an insertion and a deletion occur at more or less the same point in the text but appear to be quite independent of one another (i.e. the inserted text string does not replace the deleted one), transcribe the insertion where its caret occurs if it has one, and otherwise transcribe them in whatever seems the most logical order: for instance, ‘the great <add place="supralinear" indicator="no">red</add> <del type="strikethrough">Beast</del> Dragon’.

The spacing before and after <add> and <del> tags should generally be exactly what it would be if the tags were not there: thus ‘<del type="word strikethrough">his</del> <add place="supralinear" indicator="no">her</add> child’, but ‘supers<add place="supralinear" indicator="yes">ti</add>tion’ and ‘the <del type="cancelled">Ostro</del><del type="over">g</del><add place="over" indicator="no">G</add>oths were up in arms’.

<add place="over">, however, should always follow <del type="over"> immediately, with no space between them, even when a whole word has been overwritten.

Where text is deleted by another hand, indicate this using the @hand value of <del> and the appropriate Name Code. Obviously, identifying the hand of a deletion is often difficult or impossible, especially if working from a black-and-white microfilm printout that does not reveal changes of ink, but in a number of texts where (for instance) Newton has corrected the work of an amanuensis, it is clear that some at least of the deletions were done by him and not by the original scribe.

If deleted passages violate other element boundaries (this is a fairly rare occurrence), for instance if a paragraph and a half or two whole paragraphs have been struck through with a single cross, or if a deletion begins in the middle of an insertion and then carries on into the main text, treat it as two or more separate <del>s, but mention the fact in a <!--TRANSC --> comment.

It is not unknown for one <del type="blockStrikethrough"> to nest inside another, if, for instance, Newton has a big X taking out three lines of text and a bigger X taking out the entire page within which those three lines occur.

8) Wholly illegible deletions should be tagged <del><gap reason="illgblDel"/></del> (with, obviously, the appropriate @type value for <del>), and their length indicated by the @extent and @unit values of <gap>.

<gap reason="illgblDel"> should, by definition, only ever occur within <del>. However, if the illegible bit nests in a longer deleted but otherwise legible passage, it does not need a special <del> tag of its own. For instance:

<del type="strikethrough">Probably Pelasgus from whom they had their name was one of the sons of <gap reason="illgblDel" extent="1" unit="words"/> that Elisha who first peopled Peleponnesus.</del>

(Keynes 146)

9) Annotations that appear in manuscripts require an <anchor>, which appears at the point the annotation refers to. The annotation itself is tagged <note>, with a @place value indicating where, physically, it appears. It should be transcribed immediately after its <anchor>, leaving no space in between. The <anchor> has an @xml:id value which must be unique within the document and which is pointed to by the @target value (or one of the @target values) of the <note> it refers to. The system for assigning these values is explained in the Element Set under <anchor>.

If the text includes its own indicator of the point to which an annotation refers, such as a symbol or a superscript letter, place the <anchor> immediately after the indicator. As with <addSpan> passages (see section d) 5), these indicators should be included in the transcription, not edited out. If there is no such indicator, put the <anchor> at what seems the most appropriate point, leaving no space between it and the point it refers to, e.g. ‘as Augustine<anchor xml:id="n006r03"/><note place="marginRight" target="#n006r-03">De Civ. Dei l. 8 c. 4</note> saith’. This is usually pretty obvious from the context, but if in doubt, mention the problem in a <!--TRANSC -->.

It is sometimes necessary to link more than one <anchor> to the same <note>, as when Newton adds, say, a note ‘b’ to a passage, and then redrafts the passage with another note ‘b’ indicator at the relevant juncture, but does not bother to copy the note out all over again. In such a case, each note indicator (the letter ‘b’) is immediately followed by an <anchor> with a unique @xml:id value, and the <note> itself, which should be transcribed immediately after the first <anchor>, takes two @target values, separated by a single space. Thus, the first note indicator might be followed by <anchor xml:id="n053r-01"/> and the second by <anchor xml:id="n053r-02"/>, while the note itself is tagged <note place="marginRight" target="#n053r-01 #n053r-02">...</note>.

Notes that have been deleted should have a <del> tag nested inside them, irrespective of whether they themselves nest in a deleted passage or not. The same principle applies to underlining and any other formatting within notes, i.e. a <hi> tag is needed within the <note> irrespective of any formatting on the text in which it nests.

If the annotation is in a different hand (e.g. where John or Catherine Conduitt has annotated a Newtonian manuscript), this should be recorded as the @hand value of the <note> (see Name Codes).

If a note runs to more than one page, it may contain <pb> and <fw> as appropriate. If this results in two or more <pb>s having the same @xml:id value, modify the @xml:id values by adding -a, -b etc., as with <addSpan> (see section d) 5 above).

Variant procedure for printed texts

Annotations in printed texts are much simpler to deal with. <anchor> is not needed, and instead of a @target value the <note> has an @n value which is simply the letter, figure or symbol that functions as the note indicator in the original text. If it is a symbol, encode it as an entity, e.g. <note n="&obelus;">...</note> (see Entity Set). The note indicator itself should not be transcribed, merely recorded as an @n value. If there is no note indicator in the original text, no @n value is needed: simply transcribe the note at the point to which it refers. If this is not clear, mention the fact in a <!-- TRANSC --> comment. No @place value is needed for <note>s in printed text.

mathML Coding

Instructions on how to code mathML will ultimately go here. For now, it’s being used to test online representations.

A. A.. A... A.... A....A..

pma+x

4207355025

x+omn

176

x+z

Element Set

In the following, attributes that are mandatory (i.e. the transcription will not validate unless they are included) are preceded by **. Attributes that are not mandatory according to the schema but are nonetheless necessary for the transcribed text to display properly are preceded by *. Other attributes can (and should) be omitted where there is no call for them.

Some elements and attributes will not normally be entered by transcribers but are listed here so that you know what they are if you encounter them when proofing someone else’s work.

<!-- --> [Comment.]

This is for informal in-house comment - messages from the transcriber to him/herself and/or other project members. Such comments fall within five categories and should begin with the appropriate code (so that the editors can more easily identify the ones likely to require their personal attention).

<!--TODO -->: indicating a problem you can not solve but are fairly sure someone else can. TODO JY means you think John Young can solve it, TODO MJH means you think Mike Hawkins can, and TODO NP means someone on the project needs to look at it but you are not sure who. You can also assign TODOs to yourself, for things you can not face at the time but want to come back to later.

<!--TRANSC --> (transcription): notes on any uncertainties or reservations you have about your own transcription and/or encoding.

<!--CODIC --> (codicological): to point out features of the manuscript that these guidelines do not yet provide any means of encoding, e.g. ‘<!-- CODIC this page written upside down - jy -->’, ‘<!--CODIC the bottom of the page has been cut off, it isn't clear if there was any text on it - jy -->’.

<!--APP --> (apparatus): notes that may be of use to the editors when they come to add apparatus, e.g. recognising the source of an unattributed quote, spotting an error in a Biblical reference, or anything else where you think your expertise might contribute to the apparatus.

<!--OTHER -->: anything else.

Such comments are not treated as part of the text and (obviously) will not appear in the online or any printed version. It's a good idea (though not compulsory) to initial such notes unless they are purely for your own use and to be deleted after you've used them. This means that if the document is passed on to someone else, they know who to contact if they have any answers or suggestions. If when proofing a document you resolve a problem flagged by someone else in a <!-- -->, delete the comment.

This tag is particularly useful for the editors when preparing a document for release, as it provides an easy way of identifying points where transcribers have encountered difficulties that may need editorial attention. It cannot be overstressed that admitting to such difficulties is no cause for embarrassment. It will be looked on as evidence not of incompetence but of commendable honesty. Besides, it may very well be that the problem lies with the guidelines themselves rather than your failure to understand them, and your comments will provide useful input for the next upgrade.

Elements

<ab>
<ab> (anonymous block) contains any arbitrary component-level unit of text, acting as an anonymous container for phrase or inter level elements analogous to, but without the semantic baggage of, a paragraph. At present, it should only be used for text that behaves in all respects like a <head> except that it does not in fact introduce a new <div> or <lg>
Attributesatt.written (@hand) att.global (xml:lang, xml:base, xml:space, @xml:id, @n) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@rend(rendition) Permitted values: "center" or "indent*", * being replaced by the approximate number of spaces the first line is indented (i.e. the number of letters that would comfortably fit into the indent), in multiples of 5 up to a maximum of 40. Normally, paragraphs are indented by about five spaces: in these cases no attribute is needed. More pronounced indentation is indicated by indent10; no indentation at should have rend coded as indent0. Not needed for minor variations in paragraph indentation, only for ones that really stand out.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • hangingIndent
  • indent0
  • indent5
  • indent10
  • indent15
  • indent20
  • indent25
  • indent30
  • indent35
  • indent40
  • insetLeft5
  • insetLeft10
  • insetLeft15
  • insetLeft20
  • insetLeft25
  • insetLeft30
  • insetLeft35
  • insetLeft40
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Legal values are:
  • head
  • timeline-container
Note

This can be used for the headings of sub-divisions that ‘float’ in the middle of their parent divisions and therefore can't be tagged <div> (see above under <div>). Another example is Newton thinking he’s come to the end of a sub-section, writing a heading for the next sub-section, then thinking of something he wants to add to the first sub-section, deleting the heading and resuming the text where he’d left off.

At present, this element is only use to indicate these floating heads that appear outside the places where <head> is allowed by the TEI schema. It replaces the older custom Newton XML <floatingHead>.

Example
<ab type="head">the text of the 'floatingHead' goes here</ab>
<abbr>
<abbr> (abbreviation) contains any conventional abbreviation other than a brevigraph (for which see <orig>). This element is used in tandem with <expan> and both are contained within <choice>. <expan> contains the expanded form of the text.
Note

The commonest conventional abbreviations - ‘ye’, ‘yt’, ‘wch’, ‘wth’ and many more - can be encoded as entities (see Entity Set). Do not bother tagging abbreviations that are still conventional, e.g. ‘Dr’, ‘Mr’, 'lib.’ (for ‘liber’). Do not tag abbreviations of proper nouns, e.g. ‘Matt.’ for ‘Matthew’. And do not tag idiosyncratic abbreviations like ‘i t n o t F t S a t h g’, but do feel free to throw in a comment tag such as ‘<APP I guess he means ‘in the name of the Father, the Son and the holy ghost’>’.

Example
His <choice><abbr>Ma<hi rend="superscript">tie</hi></abbr><expan>Majestie</expan></choice>
Example
<choice><abbr>S<hi rend="superscript">tus</hi></abbr><expan cert="high">Spiritus</expan></choice>
<abstract>
<abstract> contains a summary or formal abstract prefixed to an existing source document by the encoder.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

This element is intended only for cases where no abstract is available in the original source. Any abstract already present in the source document should be encoded as a <div> within the <front>, as it should for a born-digital document.

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<profileDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><abstract resp="#LB"><p>Good database design involves the acquisition and deployment of skills which have a wider relevance to the educational process. From a set of more or less instinctive rules of thumb a formal discipline or "methodology" of database design has evolved. Applying that methodology can be of great benefit to a very wide range of academic subjects: it requires fundamental skills of abstraction and generalisation and it provides a simple mechanism whereby complex ideas and information structures can be represented and manipulated, even without the use of a computer. </p></abstract></profileDesc>
<add>
<add> (addition) contains text that has been added by the author or by another hand.
AttributesAttributesatt.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (synch, sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)
@handidentifies the person doing the addition (see Name Codes) if it is in a different hand from that of the surrounding text. Not needed for additions in the same hand as the surrounding text (which are normally the overwhelming majority). If uncertain about the identity of a hand, say so in a comment tag using TRANSC.
@placeindicates where, physically, the addition occurs. Permitted values: “supralinear” (above the line), “infralinear” (below the line), “inline” (a text string squeezed in between but not above or below two others), “interlinear” (inserted text running to more than one line so that it cannot be adequately described as either above or below the point of its insertion), “lineEnd”, “lineBeginning”, “marginRight”, “marginLeft”, “over” (for a text string that replaces another by overwriting it).
Suggested values include:
  • infralinear
  • inline
  • interlinear
  • lineBeginning
  • lineEnd
  • marginLeft
  • marginRight
  • over
  • pageBottom
  • pageTop
  • supralinear
Note

lineEnd”, “lineBeginning” are for text added in the margin at the end or beginning of a given line of text; “marginRigh” and “marginLeft” are for more substantial marginal insertions or for text that is written in the margin but is clearly intended to appear part way through a given line. These can be combined in the appropriate order, separated by single spaces, if an addition sprawls over different places, e.g. ‘<add place="inline interlinear marginRigh"/>’ means the addition starts inline, continues above the line and then proceeds into the right margin. If these values are not adequate, e.g. if the added material is wholly or partly on another page, the addition should be dealt with using <addSpan>.

@indicatorindicates the presence of a caret mark or other indicator to specify the point of insertion. It takes the values yes or no.
Legal values are:
  • yes
  • no
Note

If an <add> is wholly deleted, nest the <del> immediately inside it: ‘whose worship the Prophets upbraid with folly by representing that the Idols <add place="supralinear" indicator="yes"><del type="strikethrough">of the</del></add>can neither hear nor se nor walk’ (Keynes 7). But <add> may also nest inside <del> if the layout of the text demands it: ‘his 130th Ep. <del type="strikethrough">written to Symplicius (as Gothofredus thinks <add place="supralinear">ad Goth. thinks</add>, when Master of the Hors</del>’ (Yahuda 1.6).

<add> can also nest within <add> if an inserted passage itself contains a further insertion. In such cases, the @place value refers to where the nested insertion appears relative to the inserted text it nests in.

An <add> that replaces a deleted word or passage should be placed after the deletion, with one space between the closing <del> and the opening <add> tag, unless it has the @place value “over”, in which case it should follow without a break. If it replaces a deleted letter or letters that are only part of a word, no space should be left, e.g. ‘a<del type="cancelled">d</del><add place="inline">l</add>lowed’, ‘return<del type="strikethrough">ing</del><add place="supralinear">ed</add>’.

Must nest within any element it starts in and may not contain <p>. If an entire paragraph has been squashed in between two pre-existing ones, nest <add> directly inside <p>, with the @place value “interlinear”. Additions that violate element boundaries should be dealt with using <addSpan>.

See The Text section d) 7 for further guidance on placement of <add> and spacing around it.)

Example
The story I am going to relate is true as to its main facts, and as to the consequences <add place="above">of these facts</add> from which this tale takes its title.
<additional>
<additional> groups additional information, combining bibliographic information about a manuscript or other object, or surrogate copies of it, with curatorial or administrative information.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<additional><adminInfo><recordHist><p><!-- record history here --></p></recordHist><custodialHist><p><!-- custodial history here --></p></custodialHist></adminInfo><surrogates><p><!-- information about surrogates here --></p></surrogates><listBibl><bibl><!-- ... --></bibl><!-- full bibliography here --></listBibl></additional>
<addName>
<addName> (additional name) contains an additional name component, such as a nickname, epithet, or alias, or any other descriptive phrase used within a personal name.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Example
<persName><forename>Frederick</forename><addName type="epithet">the Great</addName><roleName>Emperor of Prussia</roleName></persName>
<addSpan>
<addSpan> (added span of text) marks the beginning of inserted text from elsewhere on the page or in the Ms., and/or which violates element boundaries and therefore cannot be rendered as <add>. The inserted text begins at the <addSpan> and continues to the corresponding <anchor>.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp) att.transcriptional (status, @cause, @seq) att.editLike (evidence, @instant) att.typed (type, @subtype) att.dimensions (unit, extent, @quantity, @precision, @scope) att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@cert(certainty) indicates the degree of certainty about whether the passage really is an insertion (as opposed to a <note> or a normal section of text, on a scale of “high”, “medium” or “low”.
Legal values are:
  • high
  • medium
  • low
@handdescribes the person who has done the addition if it is not in the same hand as the text into which it is to be inserted (see Name Codes). It is not needed if it is in the same hand (as it usually is). If uncertain about the identity of a hand, say so in a TRANSC comment.
@placeindicates where the addition physically appears. It takes the same values as <add>, or the @xml:id value of the <pb> if the added text is wholly or partly on a different page from its point of insertion. If the text runs to more than one page, list them all, separated by single spaces:
<addSpan xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" spanTo="#addend023v-01" place="p021v p022v p023v"/>
. If it is on a discrete section of the page, this can be indicated by adding a qualifier preceded by a hyphen to the @place value such as ‘p064r-marginRight’, ‘<p064r-lower>’, and ‘p064r-higher’. If uncertain how to describe the location (and it can often be far from straightforward), explain the problem in a comment tag using TRANSC. See The Text section d.5 for more detail on how to deal with such passages.
Suggested values include:
  • inline
  • supralinear
  • infralinear
  • interlinear
  • over
  • marginRight
  • marginLeft
  • lineBeginning
  • lineEnd
  • pageBottom
  • pageTop
@spanTotakes the same value to @xml:id of the <anchor> marking the end of the <addSpan> (q.v.) prefixed by a hash character (#).
@startDescriptionis not to be entered by the transcriber. This attribute is automatically generated when the document is released for publication. It provides a fuller text description of where the addition begins based on the value of @place, e.g. ‘f 21v’, ‘p 5’, ‘lower down f 17r’, ‘right margin of p 7’ (‘f’ if the document is being numbered by folio, ‘p’ if it is being numbered by page). Like the @n value of <pb>, this is what users will see on their screens at the relevant point.
@endDescriptionis not to be entered by the transcriber. This attribute is automatically generated when the document is released for publication. It indicates the point at which, physically, the main text resumes (i.e. where you were immediately before starting <addSpan>) based on the previous relevant <pb>’s @n value.
Note

Both the beginning and the end of the added material must be marked; the beginning by the <addSpan> element itself, with @spanTo pointing to the @xml:id of the <anchor> marking the end.

The values of @startDescription and @endDescription will be generated automatically by various executable scripts on our server. It is consequently not necessary for you to ever enter information into these fields except in the most exceptional of circumstances (approved in advance by the chief editor).

The <addSpan> procedure is probably the most complicated concept in these guidelines, and takes a lot of getting used to. Do not be disheartened if you get it wrong the first few times.

It is not unusual for one <addSpan> passage to start in the middle of another, which is when it gets really confusing, but the instructions above still apply. If in such a case both <addSpan> passages end at the same point, they still need to have an <anchor> each, the <anchor> for the firs <addSpan> occurring immediately after that for the second <addSpan>, so that the second passage ‘nests’ in the first.

If the text includes its own note indicator (such as an asterisk or superscript letter), it should be transcribed using letters, numerals or entities where possible, or otherwise as a <newtonSymbol> (q.v.). The <anchor> should appear immediately after it, without a space between. Otherwise, place the <anchor> immediately before or after the word or passage you think the note refers to. Keep it as close as the sense permits to where the note actually occurs. For instance, if Newton quotes a paragraph from Plutarch with a note reading ‘Plutarch l. 3’ in the margin parallel to the beginning of the passage, and does not provide his own note indicator, put the <anchor>, followed by the <note>, immediately before the passage, not at the end as you would with a printed footnote.

When deciding which two-digit suffix to give an <anchor>, be guided by where it appears in the transcribed text. Notes and <addSpan> passages quite often appear, physically, in the manuscript in a different order from that in which they are referenced in the transcribed text. For instance, Newton may start adding marginal notes about halfway down the page, but run out of space by the time he gets to the sixth note and so put it at the top instead. The <anchor> should still be given the suffix ‘-06’ and the note be transcribed immediately after it. Or the first reference to a passage to be inserted from f. 28v may be to what physically appears as the third paragraph on f. 28v, with the first two being marked for insertion later on in the main text - but the <anchor> still takes the value <xml:id="addend028v-01">. You can, of course, comment on such anomalies in a CODIC tag.

If you find that your <anchor> numbers have got out of kilter (for instance because you have changed your mind about where in the text an <addSpan> passage or a <note> belongs, or you realise you have missed one out), do not lose sleep. It does not really matter what order the suffixes are in, so long as the @xml:id values are all unique within the document and link the right <anchor>s to the right <addSpan>s or <note>s.

See The Text section d)5 for examples of <anchor> terminating <addSpan> passages.

Note

NB: Senior editors working on published files may encounter @startDescription and @endDescription attributes. These attributes provide a longer natural language description of where the <addSpan> starts/ends within the original document. They are automatically generated prior to building the files for release and should not be edited manually.

<adminInfo>
<adminInfo> (administrative information) contains information about the present custody and availability of the manuscript or other object, and also about the record description itself.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<adminInfo><recordHist><source>Record created <date>1 Aug 2004</date></source></recordHist><availability><p>Until 2015 permission to photocopy some materials from this collection has been limited at the request of the donor. Please ask repository staff for details if you are interested in obtaining photocopies from Series 1: Correspondence.</p></availability><custodialHist><p>Collection donated to the Manuscript Library by the Estate of Edgar Holden in 1993. Donor number: 1993-034.</p></custodialHist></adminInfo>
<age>
<age> specifies the age of a person.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • western
  • sui
  • subjective
  • objective
  • inWorld
  • chronological
  • biological
  • psychological
  • functional
@valuesupplies a numeric code representing the age or age group
Note

This attribute may be used to complement a more detailed discussion of a person's age in the content of the element

Note

As with other culturally-constructed traits such as sex, the way in which this concept is described in different cultural contexts may vary. The normalizing attributes are provided as a means of simplifying that variety to Western European norms and should not be used where that is inappropriate. The content of the element may be used to describe the intended concept in more detail, using plain text.

Example
<age value="2" notAfter="1986">under 20 in the early eighties</age>
<am>
<am> (abbreviation marker) contains a sequence of letters or signs present in an abbreviation which are omitted or replaced in the expanded form of the abbreviation.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
do you <abbr>Mr<am>.</am></abbr> Jones?
Example
<choice><abbr>Aug<am>g</am></abbr><expan>Aug<ex>ustorum duo</ex></expan></choice>
Example
<abbr>eu<am><g ref="#b-er"/></am>y</abbr><abbr><am><g ref="#b-per"/></am>sone</abbr> ...
<analytic>
<analytic> (analytic level) contains bibliographic elements describing an item (e.g. an article or poem) published within a monograph or journal and not as an independent publication.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<biblStruct><analytic><author>Chesnutt, David</author><title>Historical Editions in the States</title></analytic><monogr><title level="j">Computers and the Humanities</title><imprint><date when="1991-12">(December, 1991):</date></imprint><biblScope>25.6</biblScope><biblScope>377–380</biblScope></monogr></biblStruct>
<anchor>
<anchor> (anchor point) indicates the end of an <addSpan> passage or the point at which a <note> indicator is positioned.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.change (@change) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@xml:id(identifier) provides a unique identifier for the element bearing the attribute.
Note

The @xml:id value is generated as follows:

a) If the <anchor> terminates an <addSpan> passage:

take the xml:id value of the <pb> of the page on which the anchor occurs and replace the initial 'p' with 'addend'. Then add a hyphen and a two-digit number. The first occurrence of an <addSpan> anchor on a given page takes the suffix -01 (even if it is the only one on the page), the second takes the suffix -02, the tenth (in the unlikely event of that many ever occurring) takes -10, and so on. So the second instance of an inserted passage ending on f. 64v is marked by <anchor xml:id="addend064v-02"/>.

b) If the <anchor> is serving as a note indicator: take the xml:id value of the <pb> of the page on which the note is referenced, replace the initial 'p' with 'n', and add a hyphen and a two-digit number as with <addSpan> anchors. Thus, the fourth note referenced on f. 79r requires an <anchor> with the @xml:id value ‘n079r-04’. This is the number of the page on which the <anchor> occurs, even if the note itself is on a different page.

If the text includes its own note indicator (such as an asterisk or superscript letter), it should be transcribed using letters, numerals or entities where possible, or otherwise as a <newtonSymbol> (q.v.). The <anchor> should appear immediately after it, without a space between. Otherwise, place the <anchor> immediately before or after the word or passage you think the note refers to. Keep it as close as the sense permits to where the note actually occurs. For instance, if Newton quotes a paragraph from Plutarch with a note reading 'Plutarch l. 3' in the margin parallel to the beginning of the passage, and does not provide his own note indicator, put the <anchor>, followed by the <note>, immediately before the passage, not at the end as you would with a printed footnote.

When deciding which two-digit suffix to give an <anchor>, be guided by where it appears in the transcribed text. Notes and <addSpan> passages quite often appear, physically, in the manuscript in a different order from that in which they are referenced in the transcribed text. For instance, Newton may start adding marginal notes about halfway down the page, but run out of space by the time he gets to the sixth note and so put it at the top instead. The <anchor> should still be given the suffix ‘-06’ and the note be transcribed immediately after it. Or the first reference to a passage to be inserted from f. 28v may be to what physically appears as the third paragraph on f. 28v, with the first two being marked for insertion later on in the main text - but the <anchor>’s @xml:id still takes the value ‘addend028v-01’. You can, of course, comment on such anomalies in a comment.

If you find that your <anchor> numbers have got out of kilter (for instance because you've changed your mind about where in the text an <addSpan> passage or a <note> belongs, or you realise you've missed one out), do not lose sleep. It doesn't really matter what order the suffixes are in, so long as the @xml:id values are all unique within the document and link the right <anchor>s to the right <addSpan>s or <note>s.

Example
About seven years after that captivity when Sennacherib warred in Syria, he sent this message to the King of Iudah. <anchor xml:id="n004r-02"/><note place="marginRight" target="#n004r-02">2 King. 19.11.</note>Behold thou hast heard what the kings of Assyria have done ...
(Keynes 146)
Example
&ff;or Pope <hi rend="superscript">o</hi><anchor xml:id="n111v-01"/><note place="marginLeft" target="#n111v-01">o Epist. apud Athanas. Apol. 2</note> Iulius tells us
(Yahuda 15.6)
<app>
<app> (apparatus entry) contains one entry in a critical apparatus, with an optional lemma and usually one or more readings or notes on the relevant passage. See <rdg>.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp)
@typeIt takes authorial or variantTexts. authorial means the author or scribe has clearly indicated a choice of two or more alternative readings in a given text. variantTexts means that the editor is noting a variant reading in another draft or edition of the same text. At present, transcribers will not normally be required to deal with <type="variantTexts">, and will certainly not be required to without receiving individual instruction.
Legal values are:
  • authorial
  • variantTexts
  • translation
Example
<app><lem wit="#El #Hg">Experience</lem><rdg wit="#La" type="substantive">Experiment</rdg><rdg wit="#Ra2" type="substantive">Eryment</rdg></app>
Example
<app type="substantive"><rdgGrp type="subvariants"><lem wit="#El #Hg">Experience</lem><rdg wit="#Ha4">Experiens</rdg></rdgGrp><rdgGrp type="subvariants"><lem wit="#Cp #Ld1">Experiment</lem><rdg wit="#La">Ex<g ref="#per"/>iment</rdg></rdgGrp><rdgGrp type="subvariants"><lem resp="#ed2013">Eriment</lem><rdg wit="#Ra2">Eryment</rdg></rdgGrp></app>
Example
<app loc="1"><rdg resp="#SEG">TIMΩΔA</rdg></app>
Example
<app loc="1-6"><note>Too badly worn to yield a text</note></app>
Example
<choice xml:id="choice3"><reg>σύμπαντα</reg><orig>ΣΙΝΠΑΤΑΝ</orig></choice><!-- ... --><app from="#choice3"><note>Mommsen's fanciful normalization, reproduced here, has not been accepted by all recent editions</note></app>
<author>
<author> in a bibliographic reference, contains the name(s) of an author, personal or corporate, of a work; for example in the same form as that provided by a recognized bibliographic name authority.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<author>British Broadcasting Corporation</author><author>La Fayette, Marie Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de (1634–1693)</author><author>Anonymous</author><author>Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation</author><author><persName>Beaumont, Francis</persName> and <persName>John Fletcher</persName></author><author><orgName key="BBC">British Broadcasting Corporation</orgName>: Radio 3 Network</author>
<authority>
<authority> (release authority) supplies the name of a person or other agency responsible for making a work available, other than a publisher or distributor.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<authority xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">John Smith</authority>
<availability>
<availability> supplies information about the availability of a text, for example any restrictions on its use or distribution, its copyright status, any licence applying to it, etc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
@statussupplies a code identifying the current availability of the text.
Legal values are:
  • free
  • unknown
  • restricted
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<availability xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" status="restricted"><p>Available for academic research purposes only.</p></availability><availability xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" status="free"><p>In the public domain</p></availability><availability xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" status="restricted"><p>Available under licence from the publishers.</p></availability>
Example
<availability xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><licence target="http://opensource.org/licenses/MIT"><p>The MIT License applies to this document.</p><p>Copyright (C) 2011 by The University of Victoria</p><p>Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:</p><p>The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.</p><p>THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.</p></licence></availability>
<back>
<back> (back matter) contains any appendixes, etc. following the main part of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declaring (@decls)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<back><div type="appendix"><head>The Golden Dream or, the Ingenuous Confession</head><p>TO shew the Depravity of human Nature, and how apt the Mind is to be misled by Trinkets and false Appearances, Mrs. Two-Shoes does acknowledge, that after she became rich, she had like to have been, too fond of Money <!-- .... --></p></div><!-- ... --><div type="epistle"><head>A letter from the Printer, which he desires may be inserted</head><salute>Sir.</salute><p>I have done with your Copy, so you may return it to the Vatican, if you please; <!-- ... --></p></div><div type="advert"><head>The Books usually read by the Scholars of Mrs Two-Shoes are these and are sold at Mr Newbery's at the Bible and Sun in St Paul's Church-yard.</head><list><item n="1">The Christmas Box, Price 1d.</item><item n="2">The History of Giles Gingerbread, 1d.</item><!-- ... --><item n="42">A Curious Collection of Travels, selected from the Writers of all Nations, 10 Vol, Pr. bound 1l.</item></list></div><div type="advert"><head>By the KING's Royal Patent, Are sold by J. NEWBERY, at the Bible and Sun in St. Paul's Church-Yard.</head><list><item n="1">Dr. James's Powders for Fevers, the Small-Pox, Measles, Colds, &c. 2s. 6d</item><item n="2">Dr. Hooper's Female Pills, 1s.</item><!-- ... --></list></div></back>
<bibl>
<bibl> (bibliographic citation) contains a loosely-structured bibliographic citation of which the sub-components may or may not be explicitly tagged.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.docStatus (@status)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<bibl>Blain, Clements and Grundy: Feminist Companion to Literature in English (Yale, 1990)</bibl>
Example
<bibl><title level="a">The Interesting story of the Children in the Wood</title>. In <author>Victor E Neuberg</author>, <title>The Penny Histories</title>. <publisher>OUP</publisher><date>1968</date>.</bibl>
Example
<bibl type="article" subtype="book_chapter" xml:id="carlin_2003"><author><name><surname>Carlin</surname> (<forename>Claire</forename>)</name></author>, <title level="a">The Staging of Impotence : France’s last congrès</title> dans <bibl type="monogr"><title level="m">Theatrum mundi : studies in honor of Ronald W. Tobin</title>, éd. <editor><name><forename>Claire</forename><surname>Carlin</surname></name></editor> et <editor><name><forename>Kathleen</forename><surname>Wine</surname></name></editor>, <pubPlace>Charlottesville, Va.</pubPlace>, <publisher>Rookwood Press</publisher>, <date when="2003">2003</date>.</bibl></bibl>
<biblScope>
<biblScope> (scope of bibliographic reference) defines the scope of a bibliographic reference, for example as a list of page numbers, or a named subdivision of a larger work.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.citing (@unit, @from, @to)
@type
Legal values are:
  • vol
  • pp
  • no
Note

When a single page is being cited, use the @from and @to attributes with an identical value. When no clear endpoint is provided, the @from attribute may be used without @to; for example a citation such as p. 3ff might be encoded <biblScope from="3">p. 3ff<biblScope>.

It is now considered good practice to supply this element as a sibling (rather than a child) of <imprint>, since it supplies information which does not constitute part of the imprint.

Example
<biblScope>pp 12–34</biblScope><biblScope unit="page" from="12" to="34"/><biblScope unit="volume">II</biblScope><biblScope unit="page">12</biblScope>
<biblStruct>
<biblStruct> (structured bibliographic citation) contains a structured bibliographic citation, in which only bibliographic sub-elements appear and in a specified order.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.docStatus (@status)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<biblStruct><monogr><author>Blain, Virginia</author><author>Clements, Patricia</author><author>Grundy, Isobel</author><title>The Feminist Companion to Literature in English: women writers from the middle ages to the present</title><edition>first edition</edition><imprint><publisher>Yale University Press</publisher><pubPlace>New Haven and London</pubPlace><date>1990</date></imprint></monogr></biblStruct>
<birth>
<birth> contains information about a person's birth, such as its date and place.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • caesarean
  • vaginal
  • exNihilo
  • incorporated
  • founded
  • established
Example
<birth>Before 1920, Midlands region.</birth>
Example
<birth when="1960-12-10">In a small cottage near <name type="place">Aix-la-Chapelle</name>, early in the morning of <date>10 Dec 1960</date></birth>
<body>
<body> (text body) contains the whole body of a single unitary text, excluding any front or back matter.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declaring (@decls)
Example
<body><div/><div/><div/><!--there may be any number of <gi>div</gi>s bar zero; there may be <gi>div</gi>s within <gi>div</gi>s if necessary--></body>
<catDesc>
<catDesc> (category description) describes some category within a taxonomy or text typology, either in the form of a brief prose description or in terms of the situational parameters used by the TEI formal <textDesc>.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<catDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">Prose reportage</catDesc>
Example
<catDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><textDesc n="novel"><channel mode="w">print; part issues</channel><constitution type="single"/><derivation type="original"/><domain type="art"/><factuality type="fiction"/><interaction type="none"/><preparedness type="prepared"/><purpose type="entertain" degree="high"/><purpose type="inform" degree="medium"/></textDesc></catDesc>
<category>
<category> contains an individual descriptive category, possibly nested within a superordinate category, within a user-defined taxonomy.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<category xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" xml:id="b1"><catDesc>Prose reportage</catDesc></category>
Example
<category xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" xml:id="b2"><catDesc>Prose </catDesc><category xml:id="b11"><catDesc>journalism</catDesc></category><category xml:id="b12"><catDesc>fiction</catDesc></category></category>
Example
<category xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" xml:id="LIT"><catDesc xml:lang="pl">literatura piękna</catDesc><catDesc xml:lang="en">fiction</catDesc><category xml:id="LPROSE"><catDesc xml:lang="pl">proza</catDesc><catDesc xml:lang="en">prose</catDesc></category><category xml:id="LPOETRY"><catDesc xml:lang="pl">poezja</catDesc><catDesc xml:lang="en">poetry</catDesc></category><category xml:id="LDRAMA"><catDesc xml:lang="pl">dramat</catDesc><catDesc xml:lang="en">drama</catDesc></category></category>
<cb>
<cb> (column beginning) marks the beginning of a new column of a text on a multi-column page.
Attributesatt.edition (@ed, @edRef) att.breaking (@break) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype)
Note

On this element, the global @n attribute indicates the number or other value associated with the column which follows the point of insertion of this <cb> element. Encoders should adopt a clear and consistent policy as to whether the numbers associated with column breaks relate to the physical sequence number of the column in the whole text, or whether columns are numbered within the page. The <cb> element is placed at the head of the column to which it refers.

ExampleMarkup of an early English dictionary printed in two columns:
<pb/><cb n="1"/><entryFree><form>Well</form>, <sense>a Pit to hold Spring-Water</sense>: <sense>In the Art of <hi rend="italic">War</hi>, a Depth the Miner sinks into the Ground, to find out and disappoint the Enemies Mines, or to prepare one</sense>.</entryFree><entryFree>To <form>Welter</form>, <sense>to wallow</sense>, or <sense>lie groveling</sense>.</entryFree><!-- remainder of column --><cb n="2"/><entryFree><form>Wey</form>, <sense>the greatest Measure for dry Things, containing five Chaldron</sense>.</entryFree><entryFree><form>Whale</form>, <sense>the greatest of Sea-Fishes</sense>.</entryFree>
<cell>
<cell> contains one cell of a table.
Attributesatt.tableDecoration (@role, @rows, @cols) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
@rend(rendition) indicates how the element in question was rendered or presented in the source text.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • borderAll
  • borderBottom
  • borderLeft
  • borderRight
  • borderSides
  • borderTop
  • borderAllDotted
  • borderBottomDotted
  • borderLeftDotted
  • borderRightDotted
  • borderSidesDotted
  • borderTopDotted
  • width05
  • width10
  • width15
  • width20
  • width25
  • width30
  • width33
  • width35
  • width40
  • width45
  • width50
  • width55
  • width60
  • width65
  • width66
  • width70
  • width75
  • width80
  • width85
  • width90
  • width95
  • width100
Example
<row><cell role="label">General conduct</cell><cell role="data">Not satisfactory, on account of his great unpunctuality and inattention to duties</cell></row>
<change>
<change> documents a change or set of changes made during the production of a source document, or during the revision of an electronic file.
Attributesatt.ascribed (@who) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@statusdescribes the status of a document (only to be set by senior editors).
Legal values are:
  • draft
  • proofed
  • released
@typeRecord type of change
Legal values are:
  • text
  • metadata
Note

NH: @status is only to be set by senior members of the project.

Example
<revisionDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><change when="2008-03-24"><name>John Young</name> began tagged transcription</change><change when="2008-04-19"><name>John Young</name> completed tagged transcription</change><change when="2009-04-20"><name>Michael Hawkins</name> began checking against microfilm</change><change when="2009-05-01"><name>Michael Hawkins</name> finished checking</change></revisionDesc>
<choice>
<choice> links two or more alternative renditions of a single text string. See <abbr>, <orig>, <sic> and <unclear>.
Attributesatt.typed (@type, @subtype) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
Note

<choice> may nest within <choice>, so if you have (for instance) two alternative readings of an abbreviated word, each of which would lead to a different expansion, they can be tagged as in the final example below.

Example
<choice><abbr>Doct.</abbr><expan>Doctor</expan></choice>
<classDecl>
<classDecl> (classification declarations) contains one or more taxonomies defining any classificatory codes used elsewhere in the text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<classDecl xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><taxonomy xml:id="LCSH"><bibl>Library of Congress Subject Headings</bibl></taxonomy></classDecl><!-- ... --><textClass xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><keywords scheme="#LCSH"><term>Political science</term><term>United States -- Politics and government — Revolution, 1775-1783</term></keywords></textClass>
<closer>
<closer> groups together salutations, datelines, and similar phrases appearing as a final group at the end of a division, especially of a letter.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.written (@hand)
Example
<div type="letter"><p>perhaps you will favour me with a sight of it when convenient.</p><closer><salute>I remain, &c. &c.</salute><signed>H. Colburn</signed></closer></div>
Example
<div type="chapter"><p><!-- ... --> and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.</p><closer><dateline><name type="place">Trieste-Zürich-Paris,</name><date>1914–1921</date></dateline></closer></div>
<collection>
<collection> contains the name of a collection of manuscripts or other objects, not necessarily located within a single repository.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msIdentifier><country>USA</country><region>California</region><settlement>San Marino</settlement><repository>Huntington Library</repository><collection>Ellesmere</collection><idno>El 26 C 9</idno><msName>The Ellesmere Chaucer</msName></msIdentifier>
<condition>
<condition> contains a description of the physical condition of the manuscript or object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<condition><p>There are lacunae in three places in this manuscript. After 14v two leaves has been cut out and narrow strips leaves remains in the spine. After 68v one gathering is missing and after 101v at least one gathering of 8 leaves has been lost. </p><p>Several leaves are damaged with tears or holes or have a irregular shape. Some of the damages do not allow the lines to be of full length and they are apparently older than the script. There are tears on fol. 2r-v, 9r-v, 10r-v, 15r-18v, 19r-v, 20r-22v, 23r-v, 24r-28v, 30r-v, 32r-35v, 37r-v, 38r-v, 40r-43v, 45r-47v, 49r-v, 51r-v, 53r-60v, 67r-v, 68r-v, 70r-v, 74r-80v, 82r-v, 86r-v, 88r-v, 89r-v, 95r-v, 97r-98v 99r-v, 100r-v. On fol. 98 the corner has been torn off. Several leaves are in a bad condition due to moist and wear, and have become dark, bleached or wrinkled. </p><p>The script has been touched up in the 17th century with black ink. The touching up on the following fols. was done by <name>Bishop Brynjólf Sveinsson</name>: 1v, 3r, 4r, 5r, 6v, 8v,9r, 10r, 14r, 14v, 22r,30v, 36r-52v, 72v, 77r,78r,103r, 104r,. An AM-note says according to the lawman <name>Sigurður Björnsson</name> that the rest of the touching up was done by himself and another lawman <name>Sigurður Jónsson</name>. <name>Sigurður Björnsson</name> did the touching up on the following fols.: 46v, 47r, 48r, 49r-v, 50r, 52r-v. <name>Sigurður Jónsson</name> did the rest of the touching up in the section 36r-59r containing <title>Bretasögur</title></p></condition>
<corr>
<corr> (correction) contains what [you think] the author or scribe meant to write. It is used in tandem with <sic> (faulty text) and both are contained within a <choice> element.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source) att.editLike (evidence, @instant) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@cert(certainty) indicates the degree of certainty about the suggested correction. Values are “high”, “medium” or “low”. Where two alternate <corr>s nest in <choice>, this can be used to give relative weighting to the proposed alternatives. The @cert attribute is only required if there is any doubt about the required correction.
Legal values are:
  • high
  • medium
  • low
@typeuses the value “noText” if there should not be any text at all or the value ‘delText’ if the text should be deleted but it is not. If there are two or more plausible corrections, enter them as two or more <corr>s nesting in a <choice> element which itself nests within the <choice> tag containing <sic>.
Legal values are:
  • noText
  • delText
Note

<corr> and <sic> (contained within <choice>) must be included even if it is blindingly obvious what it should be. To restore text that is missing because of manuscript damage or authorial or scribal absent-mindedness, use <supplied>, not <sic> and <corr>.

Both <sic> and <corr> should normally be applied to whole words, not just the bit of the word where the mistake occurs.

<sic> and <corr> should be used sparingly, for things that really are obvious mistakes, not to modernise or standardise the original spelling or punctuation. If in doubt, do not correct but mention your doubts in a comment.

If the text should be deleted but isn't, give the <corr> element the @type value ‘delText’. If there are two or more plausible corrections, enter them as two or more <corr>s nesting in a <choice> tag which itself nests within the <choice> tag containing <sic>.

<corr> may additionally have a cert attribute that indicates the degree of certainty about the suggested correction on a scale of ‘high’, ‘medium’ or ‘low’. Where two alternative <corr>s nest in <choice>, this can be used to give relative weighting to the proposed alternatives. The cert attribute is only required if there is any doubt about the required correction.

ExampleHere the second ‘the’ should not appear, therefore we use
<corr type="noText"/>
.
the killing of the <lb/><choice><sic>the</sic><corr type="noText"/></choice> witnesses
(Yahuda 1.3)
Example
in <choice><sic>explaing<lb/>ing</sic><corr>explain<lb/>ing</corr></choice> how (according to Montanus) the son might suffer without the father
(Yahuda 15.7)
<correspAction>
<correspAction> (correspondence action) contains a structured description of the place, the name of a person/organization and the date related to the sending/receiving of a message or any other action related to the correspondence.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typedescribes the nature of the action.
Suggested values include:
  • sent
  • received
  • transmitted
  • redirected
  • forwarded
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<correspAction xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="sent"><persName>Adelbert von Chamisso</persName><settlement>Vertus</settlement><date when="1807-01-29"/></correspAction>
<correspContext>
<correspContext> (correspondence context) provides references to preceding or following correspondence related to this piece of correspondence.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<correspContext xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><ptr type="next" subtype="toAuthor" target="http://tei.ibi.hu-berlin.de/berliner-intellektuelle/manuscript?Brief101VarnhagenanBoeckh"/><ptr type="prev" subtype="fromAuthor" target="http://tei.ibi.hu-berlin.de/berliner-intellektuelle/manuscript?Brief103BoeckhanVarnhagen"/></correspContext>
Example
<correspContext xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><ref type="prev" target="http://weber-gesamtausgabe.de/A040962"> Previous letter of <persName>Carl Maria von Weber</persName> to <persName>Caroline Brandt</persName>: <date when="1816-12-30">December 30, 1816</date></ref><ref type="next" target="http://weber-gesamtausgabe.de/A041003"> Next letter of <persName>Carl Maria von Weber</persName> to <persName>Caroline Brandt</persName>: <date when="1817-01-05">January 5, 1817</date></ref></correspContext>
<correspDesc>
<correspDesc> (correspondence description) contains a description of the actions related to one act of correspondence.
Attributesatt.declarable (@default) att.canonical (@key, @ref) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<correspDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><correspAction type="sent"><persName>Carl Maria von Weber</persName><settlement>Dresden</settlement><date when="1817-06-23">23 June 1817</date></correspAction><correspAction type="received"><persName>Caroline Brandt</persName><settlement>Prag</settlement></correspAction><correspContext><ref type="prev" target="http://www.weber-gesamtausgabe.de/A041209">Previous letter of <persName>Carl Maria von Weber</persName> to <persName>Caroline Brandt</persName>: <date from="1817-06-19" to="1817-06-20">June 19/20, 1817</date></ref><ref type="next" target="http://www.weber-gesamtausgabe.de/A041217">Next letter of <persName>Carl Maria von Weber</persName> to <persName>Caroline Brandt</persName>: <date when="1817-06-27">June 27, 1817</date></ref></correspContext></correspDesc>
<country>
<country> contains the name of a geo-political unit, such as a nation, country, colony, or commonwealth, larger than or administratively superior to a region and smaller than a bloc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<country key="DK">Denmark</country>
<creation>
<creation> contains information about the creation of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<creation xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><date>Before 1987</date></creation>
Example
<creation xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><date when="1988-07-10">10 July 1988</date></creation>
<custodialHist>
<custodialHist> (custodial history) contains a description of a manuscript or other object's custodial history, either as running prose or as a series of dated custodial events.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<custodialHist><custEvent type="conservation" notBefore="1961-03" notAfter="1963-02"> Conserved between March 1961 and February 1963 at Birgitte Dalls Konserveringsværksted.</custEvent><custEvent type="photography" notBefore="1988-05-01" notAfter="1988-05-30"> Photographed in May 1988 by AMI/FA.</custEvent><custEvent type="transfer-dispatch" notBefore="1989-11-13" notAfter="1989-11-13"> Dispatched to Iceland 13 November 1989.</custEvent></custodialHist>
<damage>
<damage> contains an area of damage to the text witness.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.damaged (@agent, @degree, @group) (att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) ) (att.written (@hand))
Note

Since damage to text witnesses frequently makes them harder to read, the <damage> element will often contain an <unclear> element. If the damaged area is not continuous (e.g. a stain affecting several strings of text), the @group attribute may be used to group together several related <damage> elements; alternatively the <join> element may be used to indicate which <damage> and <unclear> elements are part of the same physical phenomenon.

The <damage>, <gap>, <del>, <unclear> and <supplied> elements may be closely allied in use. See section for discussion of which element is appropriate for which circumstance.

Example
<l>The Moving Finger wri<damage agent="water" group="1">es; and</damage> having writ,</l><l>Moves <damage agent="water" group="1"><supplied>on: nor all your</supplied></damage> Piety nor Wit</l>
<damageSpan>
<damageSpan> (damaged span of text) marks the beginning of a longer sequence of text which is damaged in some way but still legible.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.damaged (@agent, @degree, @group) (att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) ) (att.written (@hand)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.spanning (@spanTo)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<p>Paragraph partially damaged. This is the undamaged portion <damageSpan spanTo="#a34"/>and this the damaged portion of the paragraph.</p><p>This paragraph is entirely damaged.</p><p>Paragraph partially damaged; in the middle of this paragraph the damage ends and the anchor point marks the start of the <anchor xml:id="a34"/> undamaged part of the text. ...</p>
<date>
<date> contains a date in any format.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Example
<date when="1980-02">early February 1980</date>
Example
Given on the <date when="1977-06-12">Twelfth Day of June in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy-seven of the Republic the Two Hundredth and first and of the University the Eighty-Sixth.</date>
Example
<date when="1990-09">September 1990</date>
<death>
<death> contains information about a person's death, such as its date and place.
Attributesatt.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • proclaimed
  • assumed
  • verified
  • clinical
  • brain
  • natural
  • unnatural
  • fragmentation
  • dissolution
Note

This attribute is not intended to express the cause of death.

Example
<death when="1902-10-01"/>
Example
<death when="1960-12-10">Passed away near <name type="place">Aix-la-Chapelle</name>, after suffering from cerebral palsy.</death>
<del>
<del> (deletion) contains text deleted by the author or another scribe.
Attributesatt.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.transcriptional (status, @cause, @seq) att.editLike (evidence, @instant) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@statustakes the value erroneous where material has been deleted that should not have been.
Legal values are:
  • erroneous
@handindicates if the deletion has obviously been made by another hand, indicate this with the appropriate Name Code. Not needed if the deletion is in the same hand as the original text string (as it usually is).
@typedescribes the level of deletion. Permitted values: "blockStrikethrough" (whole section struck through en bloc), "strikethrough" (continuous horizontal line through a text string), "cancelled" (heavier deletion); "over" (one text string overwritten by another).
Legal values are:
  • blockStrikethrough
  • cancelled
  • over
  • strikethrough
Note

The borderline between strikethrough and cancelled is somewhat subjective but not really all that important.

Must nest within any element(s) it starts in, and may not contain <p>. If a deletion does violate element boundaries, simply treat it as two (or more) separate <del>s, but add a TRANSC tag for future reference (see the third example below and The Text section d) 7).

<del> can nest within <del> if a text string in a deleted passage had itself already been deleted before the rest of the passage was.

If the reading of the deletion, or part of it, is uncertain, nest an <unclear reason="del"> tag in the <del>. If the deletion, or part of it, is completely illegible, nest <gap reason="illgblDel"/> within the <del>.

Example
Valentinian II <del type="cancelled">by the <gap unit="words" extent="2" reason="illgblDel"/></del> sided with the Arrians in Italy
(Yahuda 1.5)
<delSpan>
<delSpan> (deleted span of text) marks the beginning of a longer sequence of text deleted, marked as deleted, or otherwise signaled as superfluous or spurious by an author, scribe, annotator, or corrector.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.spanning (@spanTo) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<p>Paragraph partially deleted. This is the undeleted portion <delSpan spanTo="#a23"/>and this the deleted portion of the paragraph.</p><p>Paragraph deleted together with adjacent material.</p><p>Second fully deleted paragraph.</p><p>Paragraph partially deleted; in the middle of this paragraph the deletion ends and the anchor point marks the resumption <anchor xml:id="a23"/> of the text. ...</p>
<desc>
<desc> (description) contains a brief description of the object documented by its parent element, typically a documentation element or an entity.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.translatable (@versionDate) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
<elementSpec xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" module="core" ident="teiCorpus" validUntil="2027-10-20"><desc versionDate="2017-02-07" xml:lang="en">contains the whole of a TEI encoded corpus, comprising a single corpus header and one or more <gi>TEI</gi> elements, each containing a single text header and a text.</desc><desc type="deprecationInfo" xml:lang="en">The <gi>TEI</gi> element is now permitted to nest directly within a <gi>TEI</gi> element. Thus the recommended encoding of a corpus is to use <gi>TEI</gi> with a <att>type</att> of <val>corpus</val> as the outermost element of a set of TEI documents that are to be treated as a single corpus.</desc><!-- ... --></elementSpec>
Note

When used in a specification element such as <elementSpec>, TEI convention requires that this be expressed as a finite clause, begining with an active verb.

Example
<desc xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron">contains a brief description of the purpose and intended use of a documentation element, or a brief characterisation of a parent entity </desc>
<div>
<div> (text division) contains a section of text such as a chapter or sub-chapter..
Attributesatt.divLike (@org, @sample) (att.fragmentable (@part)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
Note

It has no attributes. Note that <div> can nest within other <div> (e.g. chapters within a document or sub-chapters within chapters). However, <div>s must ‘tessellate’, that is, one <div> must end before another can start.

This is OK: ‘<div><div>... </div><div>... </div></div>

but this is not: ‘<div>... <div>...</div> ...</div>

Because nobody told early modern writers about ‘tessellation’, self-contained sections do in fact quite often ‘float’ within their parent <div> in this fashion, but they cannot be regarded as <div>s. Simply transcribe the ‘floating’ section as though it were an undifferentiated part of the text, but if it has a heading, tag the heading <floatingHead> (q.v.).

If the document has no sub-sections, the entire text goes in a single <div> nesting directly in <body>.

Example
<body><div type="part"><head>Fallacies of Authority</head><p>The subject of which is Authority in various shapes, and the object, to repress all exercise of the reasoning faculty.</p><div n="1" type="chapter"><head>The Nature of Authority</head><p>With reference to any proposed measures having for their object the greatest happiness of the greatest number [...]</p><div n="1.1" type="section"><head>Analysis of Authority</head><p>What on any given occasion is the legitimate weight or influence to be attached to authority [...] </p></div><div n="1.2" type="section"><head>Appeal to Authority, in What Cases Fallacious.</head><p>Reference to authority is open to the charge of fallacy when [...] </p></div></div></div></body>
<edition>
<edition> describes the particularities of one edition of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<edition xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">First edition <date>Oct 1990</date></edition><edition xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" n="S2">Students' edition</edition>
<editionStmt>
<editionStmt> (edition statement) groups information relating to one edition of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<editionStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><edition n="S2">Students' edition</edition><respStmt><resp>Adapted by </resp><name>Elizabeth Kirk</name></respStmt></editionStmt>
Example
<editionStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><p>First edition, <date>Michaelmas Term, 1991.</date></p></editionStmt>
<editor>
<editor> contains a secondary statement of responsibility for a bibliographic item, for example the name of an individual, institution or organization, (or of several such) acting as editor, compiler, translator, etc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<editor role="Technical_Editor">Ron Van den Branden</editor><editor role="Editor-in-Chief">John Walsh</editor><editor role="Managing_Editor">Anne Baillot</editor>
<editorialDecl>
<editorialDecl> (editorial practice declaration) provides details of editorial principles and practices applied during the encoding of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<editorialDecl xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><normalization><p>All words converted to Modern American spelling using Websters 9th Collegiate dictionary </p></normalization><quotation marks="all"><p>All opening quotation marks converted to “ all closing quotation marks converted to &cdq;.</p></quotation></editorialDecl>
<encodingDesc>
<encodingDesc> (encoding description) documents the relationship between an electronic text and the source or sources from which it was derived.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<encodingDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><p>Basic encoding, capturing lexical information only. All hyphenation, punctuation, and variant spellings normalized. No formatting or layout information preserved.</p></encodingDesc>
<event>
<event> contains data relating to any kind of significant event associated with a person, place, or organization.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.sortable (@sortKey)
@whereindicates the location of an event by pointing to a <place> element
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<person><event type="mat" when="1972-10-12"><label>matriculation</label></event><event type="grad" when="1975-06-23"><label>graduation</label></event></person>
<ex>
<ex> (editorial expansion) contains a sequence of letters added by an editor or transcriber when expanding an abbreviation.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
The address is Southmoor <choice><expan>R<ex>oa</ex>d</expan><abbr>Rd</abbr></choice>
<expan>
<expan> (expansion) contains the expanded form of any conventional abbreviation. This element is used in tandem with <abbr> and both are contained within <choice>. <abbr> contains the abbreviated form of the text.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (resp, @cert) att.editLike (evidence, @instant)
Note

Expansions and abbreviations do not need to be tagged for abbreviations that are still conventional, e.g. ‘Dr’, ‘Mr’, 'lib.’ (for ‘liber’) or proper nouns, e.g. ‘Matt.’ for ‘Matthew’. They also do not need to be coded for idiosyncratic strings like ‘i t n o t F t S a t h g’, but do feel free to throw in a comment tag such as ‘<APP I guess he means ‘in the name of the Father, the Son and the holy ghost’>’.

Example
His <choice><abbr>Ma<hi rend="superscript">tie</hi></abbr><expan>Majestie</expan></choice>
Example
<choice><abbr>S<hi rend="superscript">tus</hi></abbr><expan cert="high">Spiritus</expan></choice>
<extent>
<extent> describes the approximate size of a text stored on some carrier medium or of some other object, digital or non-digital, specified in any convenient units.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<extent xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">3200 sentences</extent><extent xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">between 10 and 20 Mb</extent><extent xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">ten 3.5 inch high density diskettes</extent>
ExampleThe <measure> element may be used to supply normalised or machine tractable versions of the size or sizes concerned.
<extent xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><measure unit="MiB" quantity="4.2">About four megabytes</measure><measure unit="pages" quantity="245">245 pages of source material</measure></extent>
<facsimile>
<facsimile> contains a representation of some written source in the form of a set of images rather than as transcribed or encoded text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declaring (@decls)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<facsimile><graphic url="page1.png"/><surface><graphic url="page2-highRes.png"/><graphic url="page2-lowRes.png"/></surface><graphic url="page3.png"/><graphic url="page4.png"/></facsimile>
Example
<facsimile><surface ulx="0" uly="0" lrx="200" lry="300"><graphic url="Bovelles-49r.png"/></surface></facsimile>
<figDesc>
<figDesc> (description of figure) contains a brief prose description of a graphic and nests within <figure>.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

This element is intended for use as an alternative to the content of its parent <figure> element ; for example, to display when the image is required but the equipment in use cannot display graphic images. It may also be used for indexing or documentary purposes.

Example
<figure><graphic url="emblem1.png"/><head>Emblemi d'Amore</head><figDesc>A pair of naked winged cupids, each holding a flaming torch, in a rural setting.</figDesc></figure>
<figure>
<figure> groups elements representing or containing graphic information such as an illustration, formula, or figure.
Attributesatt.placement (@place) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.written (@hand) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.change (@change) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source)
@rend(rendition) permitted values: ‘blockCentered’ (image centered with no text on either the left or right), ‘floatLeft’ (image floated to the left with the text wrapping around it on the right), ‘floatRight’ (image floated to the right with the text wrapping around it on the left), ‘inline’ (text is positioned inline).
Legal values are:
  • blockCentered
  • floatLeft
  • floatRight
  • inline
Note

Transcribers will not be expected to enter this element or its children (<graphic> and <figDesc>) unless given special instruction. Simply note the presence of a figure in the text in a TODO NP comment tag including a description of where the image is on the page, e.g. ‘’.

Example
<figure><head>The View from the Bridge</head><figDesc>A Whistleresque view showing four or five sailing boats in the foreground, and a series of buoys strung out between them.</figDesc><graphic url="http://www.example.org/fig1.png" scale="0.5"/></figure>
<fileDesc>
<fileDesc> (file description) contains a full bibliographic description of an electronic file.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<fileDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><titleStmt><title>The shortest possible TEI document</title></titleStmt><publicationStmt><p>Distributed as part of TEI P5</p></publicationStmt><sourceDesc><p>No print source exists: this is an original digital text</p></sourceDesc></fileDesc>
<foliation>
<foliation> describes the numbering system or systems used to count the leaves or pages in a codex or similar object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<foliation>Contemporary foliation in red roman numerals in the centre of the outer margin.</foliation>
<foreign>
<foreign> identifies text in a different language from the text immediately surrounding it.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (xml:lang, @xml:id, @n, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)
@xml:lang(language) identifies the language of the text. Permitted values: “ara”, “chu”, “eng”, “fre”, “ger”,“gre”, “heb”, “eng”, “lat”, “por” (Arabic, Old Church Slavonic, English, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin and Portuguese). If you come across anything else, consult an editor.
Legal values are:
  • ara
  • chu
  • eng
  • fre
  • ger
  • gre
  • heb
  • ita
  • lat
  • por
Note

<foreign> must nest within whatever element(s) it starts in and may not contain <p> or <l>, which of course foreign language passages frequently do: in such cases, use repeated <foreign> tags nesting in <p> or <l>. If, as sometimes happens, the document simply changes language halfway through, or goes into a different language for pages on end, do not bother nesting <foreign> in every single <p> or <l>: just mention the fact in an !-- APP -- note. But if in doubt, apply the tag: it cannot do any harm.

Note that English may be regarded as a foreign language if the main language of the document is something else (usually Latin).

Example
This is heathen Greek to you still? Your <foreign xml:lang="la">lapis philosophicus</foreign>?
<forename>
<forename> contains a forename, given or baptismal name.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<persName><roleName>Ex-President</roleName><forename>George</forename><surname>Bush</surname></persName>
<formula>
<formula> contains a mathematical or other formula.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.notated (@notation)
Note

On coding presentational mathematical content, see: http://www.w3.org/Math/testsuite/mml2-testsuite/index.html.

Another useful resource is: http://www.mathmlcentral.com/

The bulk of the coding in presentational mathML will likely be done with a very small subset of the available tags, chief of which will be: <mfrac>, <mi>, <mn>, <mo>, <mtext>, <mrow>, <root>, <msqrt> and <msup>

Transcribers dealing with mathematical texts will be given special instruction on how to apply these.

Example
<formula><math xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML"><mfrac><mi>a</mi><mi>b</mi></mfrac></math></formula>
<front>
<front> (front matter) contains any prefatory matter (headers, abstracts, title page, prefaces, dedications, etc.) found at the start of a document, before the main body.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declaring (@decls)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<front><epigraph><quote>Nam Sibyllam quidem Cumis ego ipse oculis meis vidi in ampulla pendere, et cum illi pueri dicerent: <q xml:lang="gr">Σίβυλλα τί θέλεις</q>; respondebat illa: <q xml:lang="gr">ὰποθανεῖν θέλω.</q></quote></epigraph><div type="dedication"><p>For Ezra Pound <q xml:lang="it">il miglior fabbro.</q></p></div></front>
Example
<front><div type="dedication"><p>To our three selves</p></div><div type="preface"><head>Author's Note</head><p>All the characters in this book are purely imaginary, and if the author has used names that may suggest a reference to living persons she has done so inadvertently. ...</p></div></front>
Example
<front><div type="abstract"><div><head>BACKGROUND:</head><p>Food insecurity can put children at greater risk of obesity because of altered food choices and nonuniform consumption patterns.</p></div><div><head>OBJECTIVE:</head><p>We examined the association between obesity and both child-level food insecurity and personal food insecurity in US children.</p></div><div><head>DESIGN:</head><p>Data from 9,701 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2010, aged 2 to 11 years were analyzed. Child-level food insecurity was assessed with the US Department of Agriculture's Food Security Survey Module based on eight child-specific questions. Personal food insecurity was assessed with five additional questions. Obesity was defined, using physical measurements, as body mass index (calculated as kg/m2) greater than or equal to the age- and sex-specific 95th percentile of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Logistic regressions adjusted for sex, race/ethnic group, poverty level, and survey year were conducted to describe associations between obesity and food insecurity.</p></div><div><head>RESULTS:</head><p>Obesity was significantly associated with personal food insecurity for children aged 6 to 11 years (odds ratio=1.81; 95% CI 1.33 to 2.48), but not in children aged 2 to 5 years (odds ratio=0.88; 95% CI 0.51 to 1.51). Child-level food insecurity was not associated with obesity among 2- to 5-year-olds or 6- to 11-year-olds.</p></div><div><head>CONCLUSIONS:</head><p>Personal food insecurity is associated with an increased risk of obesity only in children aged 6 to 11 years. Personal food-insecurity measures may give different results than aggregate food-insecurity measures in children.</p></div></div></front>
<fw>
<fw> (forme work) contains scribal or printed features of the document that do not constitute part of the text proper, such as page numbers, catchwords, running heads, sigils or similar material.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.change (@change)
@placespecifies the position of the former work on the page. Combinations of ‘top’, ‘bottom’, ‘Left’, ‘Right’ and ‘Center’ can be used. Page numbers are placed usually on ‘topRight’ but sometimes on ‘centerRight’ or ‘topCenter’. We do not need to be too precise about this. Catchwords are nearly always ‘bottomRight’, but sometimes the last word on a page functions as a catchword (i.e. is duplicated at the beginning of the following page), although it is not in the normal catchword position: in such a case call it <place="inline">.
Suggested values include:
  • bottomCenter
  • bottomLeft
  • bottomRight
  • pageBottom
  • pageMiddleCenter
  • pageMiddleLeft
  • pageMiddleRight
  • pageTop
  • topCenter
  • topLeft
  • topRight
@handspecifies the hand of the person who has added the forme work (this is most likely to apply to page numbers and shelfmarks) if it is not in the same hand as the surrounding text (see Name Codes).
@typeidentifies the type of former work. Permitted values are ‘pag’ (page number), ‘catch’ (catchword), ‘header’ (running title at the head of the page), ‘sig’ (sigil), ‘shelfmark’.
Legal values are:
  • pag
  • catch
  • header
  • sig
  • shelfmark
  • other
Note

<fw> is not required in transcriptions of modern printed documents.

If a paragraph ends at the bottom of a page, and the catchword is duplicated by the first word of the next paragraph, the catchword should go between the closing <p> and the opening <p> tag, as should the <pb> and the page number (if there is one) on the new page.

Some Mss. have two or more differing page numbers on some or all of their pages: each page number should have its own <fw> tag, but if this happens mention it in a CODIC tag. No spaces should be left between the consecutive <fw> elements.

Hyphens on partical catchwords, or on partial words preceding catchwords, should be recorded as <lb type="hyphenated"/>, though <lb/> is not otherwise needed at these points.

No space should be left between <fw> and <pb> or between <pb> and <fw>.

Example
<fw type="sig" place="bottom">C3</fw>
<gap>
<gap> indicates a point where material has been omitted in a transcription because the text is illegible or lost.
Attributesatt.timed (@start, @end) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.editLike (evidence, @instant) att.dimensions (unit, extent, @quantity, @precision, @scope) att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@unitindicates in which unit the illegible text is quantified. For example, “words” or “chars” (characters).
Legal values are:
  • words
  • chars
  • lines
  • pages
@extentindicates the quantity of the illegible text using a numeric value. It can also take the value “unclear”.
@reasondescribes why the text is missing from the transcription. Permitted values: “illgblDel” (illegible deletion), “copy” (poor quality of the copy you're transcribing from), “damage” (manuscript damage, e.g. it's torn or has a hole in it -- indicate the precise nature of the damage in the agent attribute), “blot” (blotted), “blotDel” (text is obliterated by what could either be an accidental blot or a deliberate deletion), “smudge”, “over” (text is impossible to read because it's written over other text - if it's impossible to read because other text is written over it, it counts as “illgblDel”), “faded”, “foxed” (manuscript has gone brown or crozzly round the edges through age or damp), or just “hand” if it's simply a case of bad handwriting, though normally a guess at least should be possible, tagged <unclear reason="hand" cert="low">. If none of these values seems to fit exactly, use whichever you think comes closest and specify the problem in a TRANSC comment.
Legal values are:
  • binding
  • blot
  • blotDel
  • copy
  • damage
  • del
  • editorialDecision
  • faded
  • faint
  • foxed
  • hand
  • illgbl
  • illgblDel
  • over
  • smudge
@agentspecifies the type or cause of damage that renders the text illegible, such as ‘burn’, ‘faded’, ‘fire’, ‘fold’ ‘liquid’, ‘mildew’, ‘rubbing’ or ‘torn’.
Legal values are:
  • burn
  • faded
  • fire
  • fold
  • liquid
  • mildew
  • rubbing
  • torn
Note

@extent and @unit are used together. @unit is always plural even if only one word or character is missing or illegible. unclear is used when it is difficult to determine the length of the illegible text. For example, if a page has been torn across the middle and there is no way of even guessing how much text has been lost. In this case no @unit value is needed.

<gap> is not used to indicate ‘blank space in the text’, which is dealt with by <space>. Leave a single space before and after <gap>, unless it represents only part of a word, or begins and/or ends part way through a word, in which case there should be no space between <gap> and the legible part(s) of the word(s).

Example
<gap quantity="4" unit="chars" reason="illegible"/>
Example
<gap quantity="1" unit="essay" reason="sampling"/>
Example
<del><gap atLeast="4" atMost="8" unit="chars" reason="illegible"/></del>
Example
<gap extent="several lines" reason="lost"/>
<genName>
<genName> (generational name component) contains a name component used to distinguish otherwise similar names on the basis of the relative ages or generations of the persons named.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<persName><forename>Charles</forename><genName>II</genName></persName>
Example
<persName><surname>Pitt</surname><genName>the Younger</genName></persName>
<graphic>
<graphic> indicates the location of a graphic or illustration, either forming part of a text, or providing an image of it.
Attributesatt.typed (@type, @subtype) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.media (@width, @height, @scale) (att.internetMedia (@mimeType)) att.resourced (@url) att.declaring (@decls)
Note

The @mimeType attribute should be used to supply the MIME media type of the image specified by the @url attribute.

Within the body of a text, a <graphic> element indicates the presence of a graphic component in the source itself. Within the context of a <facsimile> or <sourceDoc> element, however, a <graphic> element provides an additional digital representation of some part of the source being encoded.

Example
<figure><graphic url="fig1.png"/><head>Figure One: The View from the Bridge</head><figDesc>A Whistleresque view showing four or five sailing boats in the foreground, and a series of buoys strung out between them.</figDesc></figure>
Example
<facsimile><surfaceGrp n="leaf1"><surface><graphic url="page1.png"/></surface><surface><graphic url="page2-highRes.png"/><graphic url="page2-lowRes.png"/></surface></surfaceGrp></facsimile>
<handNote>
<handNote> (note on hand) describes a particular style or hand distinguished within a manuscript.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.handFeatures (@scribe, @scribeRef, @script, @scriptRef, @medium, @scope)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<handNote xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" scope="sole"><p>Written in insular phase II half-uncial with interlinear Old English gloss in an Anglo-Saxon pointed minuscule.</p></handNote>
<handNotes>
<handNotes> contains one or more <handNote> elements documenting the different hands identified within the source texts.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<handNotes><handNote xml:id="H1" script="copperplate" medium="brown-ink">Carefully written with regular descenders</handNote><handNote xml:id="H2" script="print" medium="pencil">Unschooled scrawl</handNote></handNotes>
<handShift>
<handShift> marks the beginning of a sequence of text written in a new hand.
Attributesatt.handFeatures (@scribe, @scribeRef, @script, @scriptRef, @medium, @scope) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.source (@source)
@resp(responsible party) indicates the encoder/editor responsible for determining that a change of hand has occurred and identifying the new hand. The value of this attribute will be the @xml:id value of the encoder/editor (as defined in the header) prefixed by a hash character (#).
@newindicates the person whose hand begins at this point (see Name Codes).
Note

This attribute serves the same function as the @hand attribute provided for those elements which are members of the att.transcriptional class. It may be renamed at a subsequent major release.

Note

Obviously, when (and if) the hand reverts to what it was before, this has to be pointed out by another <handShift> tag.

<handShift> is not needed for <add>s, <addSpan>s, <note>s or <fw> that have been added by a different hand, or for deletions made by a different hand, as this is expressed by the @hand value of the relevant tag.

Example
<l>When wolde the cat dwelle in his ynne</l><handShift medium="greenish-ink"/><l>And if the cattes skynne be slyk <handShift medium="black-ink"/> and gaye</l>
<head>
<head> (heading) contains the heading of a <div> or <lg>.
Attributesatt.placement (@place) att.written (@hand) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@rend(rendition) Permitted values: “center”, “right” or “indent*”, * being replaced by the approximate number of spaces the first line is indented (i.e. the number of letters that would comfortably fit into the indent), in multiples of 5 up to a maximum of 40. Normally, paragraphs are indented by about five spaces: in these cases no attribute is needed. More pronounced indentation is indicated by indent10; no indentation at should have @rend coded as indent0. Not needed for minor variations in paragraph indentation, only for ones that really stand out.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • hangingIndent
  • indent0
  • indent5
  • indent10
  • indent15
  • indent20
  • indent25
  • indent30
  • indent35
  • indent40
  • insetLeft5
  • insetLeft10
  • insetLeft15
  • insetLeft20
  • insetLeft25
  • insetLeft30
  • insetLeft35
  • insetLeft40
Note

The nested <div>: ‘Paradoxical Questions’ is the title of the entire document, so the first <div> will not be closed till the end of the document; ‘Quest 1’ is the first section, so the second <div> will be closed at the end of that section and a new <div> opened for ‘Quest. 2’.

Do not worry if a heading is not exactly centered. The layout of the text is the least of our worries, and people who are interested in it will want to look at the original or a facsimile anyway. We do not need to give more than a general idea.

Users of British English please note the American-cum-Newtonian spelling of ‘center’.

Example
<div><head rend="center">Paradoxical Questions concerning the morals & actions of Athanasius & his followers.</head><div><head rend="center">Quest. 1. <lb type="intentional"/>Whether the ignominious death of Arius in a bog-house was not a story feigned & put about by Athanasius above twenty years after his death.</head></div></div>
(Keynes 10)
<hi>
<hi> (highlighted) marks text that has been rendered graphically different from the surrounding text, e.g. underlined, superscript, italicised, etc.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
@rend(rendition) permitted values: ‘allCaps’, ‘bold’, ‘doubleUnderline’, ‘dropCap’, ‘italic’, ‘large’, ‘larger’, ‘largest’, ‘overline’, ‘small’, ‘smallCaps’, ‘smaller’, ‘smallest’, ‘subscript’, ‘superscript’ or ‘underline’.
Legal values are:
  • allCaps
  • bold
  • doubleUnderline
  • dropCap
  • italic
  • large
  • larger
  • largest
  • overline
  • small
  • smallCaps
  • smaller
  • smallest
  • subscript
  • superscript
  • underline
  • stretchyVertical
  • stretchyHorizontal
Example
<hi rend="gothic">And this Indenture further witnesseth</hi> that the said <hi rend="italic">Walter Shandy</hi>, merchant, in consideration of the said intended marriage ...
<history>
<history> groups elements describing the full history of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<history><origin><p>Written in Durham during the mid twelfth century.</p></origin><provenance><p>Recorded in two medieval catalogues of the books belonging to Durham Priory, made in 1391 and 1405.</p></provenance><provenance><p>Given to W. Olleyf by William Ebchester, Prior (1446-56) and later belonged to Henry Dalton, Prior of Holy Island (Lindisfarne) according to inscriptions on ff. 4v and 5.</p></provenance><acquisition><p>Presented to Trinity College in 1738 by Thomas Gale and his son Roger.</p></acquisition></history>
<idno>
<idno> (identifier) supplies any form of identifier used to identify some object, such as a bibliographic item, a person, a title, an organization, etc. in a standardized way.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecategorizes the identifier, for example as an ISBN, Social Security number, etc.
Suggested values include:
  • ISBN
  • ISSN
  • DOI
  • URI
  • VIAF
  • ESTC
  • OCLC
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="ISBN">978-1-906964-22-1</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="ISSN">0143-3385</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="DOI">10.1000/123</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="URI">http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/185922478</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="URI">http://authority.nzetc.org/463/</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="LT">Thomason Tract E.537(17)</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="Wing">C695</idno><idno xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" type="oldCat"><g ref="#sym"/>345</idno>
In the last case, the identifier includes a non-Unicode character which is defined elsewhere by means of a <glyph> or <char> element referenced here as #sym.
<imprimatur>
<imprimatur> contains a formal statement authorizing the publication of a work, sometimes required to appear on a title page or its verso.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<imprimatur>Licensed and entred acording to Order.</imprimatur>
<imprint>
<imprint> groups information relating to the publication or distribution of a bibliographic item.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<imprint><pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace><publisher>Clarendon Press</publisher><date>1987</date></imprint>
<institution>
<institution> contains the name of an organization such as a university or library, with which a manuscript or other object is identified, generally its holding institution.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msIdentifier><settlement>Oxford</settlement><institution>University of Oxford</institution><repository>Bodleian Library</repository><idno>MS. Bodley 406</idno></msIdentifier>
<item>
<item> (item) contains a unit within a list.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

May contain simple prose or a sequence of chunks.

Whatever string of characters is used to label a list item in the copy text may be used as the value of the global @n attribute, but it is not required that numbering be recorded explicitly. In ordered lists, the @n attribute on the <item> element is by definition synonymous with the use of the <label> element to record the enumerator of the list item. In glossary lists, however, the term being defined should be given with the <label> element, not @n.

Example
<list rend="numbered"><head>Here begin the chapter headings of Book IV</head><item n="4.1">The death of Queen Clotild.</item><item n="4.2">How King Lothar wanted to appropriate one third of the Church revenues.</item><item n="4.3">The wives and children of Lothar.</item><item n="4.4">The Counts of the Bretons.</item><item n="4.5">Saint Gall the Bishop.</item><item n="4.6">The priest Cato.</item><item>...</item></list>
<keywords>
<keywords> contains a list of keywords or phrases identifying the topic or nature of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
@schemeidentifies the controlled vocabulary within which the set of keywords concerned is defined, for example by a <taxonomy> element, or by some other resource.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<keywords xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" scheme="http://classificationweb.net"><term>Babbage, Charles</term><term>Mathematicians - Great Britain - Biography</term></keywords>
Example
<keywords xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><term>Fermented beverages</term><term>Central Andes</term><term>Schinus molle</term><term>Molle beer</term><term>Indigenous peoples</term><term>Ethnography</term><term>Archaeology</term></keywords>
<l>
<l> (verse line) contains a single, possibly incomplete, line of verse.
Attributesatt.fragmentable (@part) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
@rendpermitted values are “center” or ”indent*” [*being replaced by the approximate number of spaces the line is indented, in multiples of 5 up to a maximum of 40. Not needed if it is not indented at all with respect to the other lines around it.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • indent0
  • indent5
  • indent10
  • indent15
  • indent20
  • indent25
  • indent30
  • indent35
  • indent40
Example
<l met="x/x/x/x/x/" real="/xx/x/x/x/">Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?</l>
<label>
<label> contains any label or heading used to identify part of a text, typically but not exclusively in a list or glossary.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.placement (@place) att.written (@hand)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

ExampleLabels are commonly used for the headwords in glossary lists; note the use of the global @xml:lang attribute to set the default language of the glossary list to Middle English, and identify the glosses and headings as modern English or Latin:
<list type="gloss" xml:lang="enm"><head xml:lang="en">Vocabulary</head><headLabel xml:lang="en">Middle English</headLabel><headItem xml:lang="en">New English</headItem><label>nu</label><item xml:lang="en">now</item><label>lhude</label><item xml:lang="en">loudly</item><label>bloweth</label><item xml:lang="en">blooms</item><label>med</label><item xml:lang="en">meadow</item><label>wude</label><item xml:lang="en">wood</item><label>awe</label><item xml:lang="en">ewe</item><label>lhouth</label><item xml:lang="en">lows</item><label>sterteth</label><item xml:lang="en">bounds, frisks (cf. <cit><ref>Chaucer, K.T.644</ref><quote>a courser, <term>sterting</term>as the fyr</quote></cit></item><label>verteth</label><item xml:lang="la">pedit</item><label>murie</label><item xml:lang="en">merrily</item><label>swik</label><item xml:lang="en">cease</item><label>naver</label><item xml:lang="en">never</item></list>
ExampleLabels may also be used to record explicitly the numbers or letters which mark list items in ordered lists, as in this extract from Gibbon's Autobiography. In this usage the <label> element is synonymous with the @n attribute on the <item> element:
I will add two facts, which have seldom occurred in the composition of six, or at least of five quartos. <list rend="runon" type="ordered"><label>(1)</label><item>My first rough manuscript, without any intermediate copy, has been sent to the press.</item><label>(2) </label><item>Not a sheet has been seen by any human eyes, excepting those of the author and the printer: the faults and the merits are exclusively my own.</item></list>
ExampleLabels may also be used for other structured list items, as in this extract from the journal of Edward Gibbon:
<list type="gloss"><label>March 1757.</label><item>I wrote some critical observations upon Plautus.</item><label>March 8th.</label><item>I wrote a long dissertation upon some lines of Virgil.</item><label>June.</label><item>I saw Mademoiselle Curchod — <quote xml:lang="la">Omnia vincit amor, et nos cedamus amori.</quote></item><label>August.</label><item>I went to Crassy, and staid two days.</item></list>
Note that the <label> might also appear within the <item> rather than as its sibling. Though syntactically valid, this usage is not recommended TEI practice.
ExampleLabels may also be used to represent a label or heading attached to a paragraph or sequence of paragraphs not treated as a structural division, or to a group of verse lines. Note that, in this case, the <label> element appears within the <p> or <lg> element, rather than as a preceding sibling of it.
<p>[...] <lb/>& n’entrer en mauuais & mal-heu- <lb/>ré meſnage. Or des que le conſente- <lb/>ment des parties y eſt le mariage eſt <lb/> arreſté, quoy que de faict il ne ſoit <label place="margin">Puiſſance maritale entre les Romains.</label><lb/> conſommé. Depuis la conſomma- <lb/>tion du mariage la femme eſt ſoubs <lb/> la puiſſance du mary, s’il n’eſt eſcla- <lb/>ue ou enfant de famille : car en ce <lb/> cas, la femme, qui a eſpouſé vn en- <lb/>fant de famille, eſt ſous la puiſſance [...]</p>
In this example the text of the label appears in the right hand margin of the original source, next to the paragraph it describes, but approximately in the middle of it. If so desired the @type attribute may be used to distinguish different categories of label.
<language>
<language> characterizes a single language or sublanguage used within a text.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
@ident(identifier) Supplies a language code constructed as defined in BCP 47 which is used to identify the language documented by this element, and which is referenced by the global @xml:lang attribute.
@usagespecifies the approximate percentage (by volume) of the text which uses this language.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<langUsage xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><language ident="en-US" usage="75">modern American English</language><language ident="i-az-Arab" usage="20">Azerbaijani in Arabic script</language><language ident="x-lap" usage="05">Pig Latin</language></langUsage>
<langUsage>
<langUsage> (language usage) describes the languages, sublanguages, registers, dialects, etc. represented within a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<langUsage xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><language ident="fr-CA" usage="60">Québecois</language><language ident="en-CA" usage="20">Canadian business English</language><language ident="en-GB" usage="20">British English</language></langUsage>
<lb>
<lb> (line beginning) marks the beginning of a new line in prose sections.
Attributesatt.edition (@ed, @edRef) att.breaking (@break) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typePermitted values: “intentional”, for where we believe that the break seems to have been intentionally placed because it is or could be construed as structurally or semantically significant. The other permitted value is "hyphenated" used when a hyphenated line break occurs in the middle of a word. In all other cases (including line breaks that occur mid-word where there is no hyphen in the original), no type value is needed.
Legal values are:
  • hyphenated
  • intentional
Note

<lb> is not needed at the beginning or end of a page, heading, paragraph, line of verse or verse passage, or after an unhyphenated catchword.

Unless nesting in <fw>, <lb> should be placed right at the beginning of the following word (or part of a word) but have before it whatever spacing would be there if <lb> were not (so if it is in the middle of a word, no space, if it is at the beginning of a word, one space: see The Text section b) 3).

Use only in text on the main body of the page, including <addSpan> passages and <note>s that occur on the main body of a page, but not in marginal or interlinear additions or notes.

Example
… for by what we we produced above out of <lb/>Claudian, it is manifest that all Gallia & Spain conti<lb type="hyphenated"/>nued quiet till that great irruption of barbarians which be<lb type="hyphenated"/>gan the wars of the second Trumpet …
ExampleIn this next example there is a clear intention to force a line break between ‘Quest. 2.’ and the rest of the title, but the other line breaks occur only because that is where Newton happened to reach the end of the line, and so should not be tagged <type="intentional">.
<head rend="center">Quest. 2. <lb type="intentional"/>Whether the Meletians deserved <lb/>that ill character which Athanasius <lb/>gave them</head>
<lg>
<lg> (line group) contains one or more verse lines, e.g. a stanza, within a verse passage.
Attributesatt.divLike (@org, @sample) (att.fragmentable (@part)) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype)
Note

<lg> may nest within <lg>, i.e. stanzas within a verse passage.

Except in exceptional circumstances and following consultation with an editor, all verse passages (even if they are only one line long) should nest in <lg>.

Example
<lg type="free"><l>Let me be my own fool</l><l>of my own making, the sum of it</l></lg><lg type="free"><l>is equivocal.</l><l>One says of the drunken farmer:</l></lg><lg type="free"><l>leave him lay off it. And this is</l><l>the explanation.</l></lg>
<licence>
<licence> contains information about a licence or other legal agreement applicable to the text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<licence xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" target="http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-NZETC-Help.html#licensing"> Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 New Zealand Licence</licence>
Example
<availability xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><licence target="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/" notBefore="2013-01-01"><p>The Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) Licence applies to this document.</p><p>The licence was added on January 1, 2013.</p></licence></availability>
<linkGrp>
<linkGrp> (link group) defines a collection of associations or hypertextual links.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.pointing.group (@domains, @targFunc) (att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate)) (att.typed (@type, @subtype))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<linkGrp type="translation"><link target="#CCS1 #SW1"/><link target="#CCS2 #SW2"/><link target="#CCS #SW"/></linkGrp><div type="volume" xml:id="CCS" xml:lang="fr"><p><s xml:id="CCS1">Longtemps, je me suis couché de bonne heure.</s><s xml:id="CCS2">Parfois, à peine ma bougie éteinte, mes yeux se fermaient si vite que je n'avais pas le temps de me dire : "Je m'endors."</s></p><!-- ... --></div><div type="volume" xml:id="SW" xml:lang="en"><p><s xml:id="SW1">For a long time I used to go to bed early.</s><s xml:id="SW2">Sometimes, when I had put out my candle, my eyes would close so quickly that I had not even time to say "I'm going to sleep."</s></p><!-- ... --></div>
<list>
<list> (list) contains items that are organised as a list.
Attributesatt.sortable (@sortKey) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.change (@change) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@rend(rendition) identifies how the items in the list will be rendered. Permitted values: “bulleted” or “numbered”.
Legal values are:
  • bulleted
  • ordered
@typedescribes the nature of the items in the list.
Suggested values include:
  • gloss
  • index
  • instructions
  • litany
  • syllogism
Note

Previous versions of these Guidelines recommended the use of @type on <list> to encode the rendering or appearance of a list (whether it was bulleted, numbered, etc.). The current recommendation is to use the @rend or @style attributes for these aspects of a list, while using @type for the more appropriate task of characterizing the nature of the content of a list.

Note

The formal syntax of the element declarations allows <label> tags to be omitted from lists tagged <list type="gloss">; this is however a semantic error.

Note

Must contain one or more <item>s inside it.

Example
<list rend="numbered"><item>a butcher</item><item>a baker</item><item>a candlestick maker, with <list rend="bulleted"><item>rings on his fingers</item><item>bells on his toes</item></list></item></list>
Example
<list type="syllogism" rend="bulleted"><item>All Cretans are liars.</item><item>Epimenides is a Cretan.</item><item>ERGO Epimenides is a liar.</item></list>
Example
<list type="litany" rend="simple"><item>God save us from drought.</item><item>God save us from pestilence.</item><item>God save us from wickedness in high places.</item><item>Praise be to God.</item></list>
ExampleThe following example treats the short numbered clauses of Anglo-Saxon legal codes as lists of items. The text is from an ordinance of King Athelstan (924–939):
<div1 type="section"><head>Athelstan's Ordinance</head><list rend="numbered"><item n="1">Concerning thieves. First, that no thief is to be spared who is caught with the stolen goods, [if he is] over twelve years and [if the value of the goods is] over eightpence. <list rend="numbered"><item n="1.1">And if anyone does spare one, he is to pay for the thief with his wergild — and the thief is to be no nearer a settlement on that account — or to clear himself by an oath of that amount.</item><item n="1.2">If, however, he [the thief] wishes to defend himself or to escape, he is not to be spared [whether younger or older than twelve].</item><item n="1.3">If a thief is put into prison, he is to be in prison 40 days, and he may then be redeemed with 120 shillings; and the kindred are to stand surety for him that he will desist for ever.</item><item n="1.4">And if he steals after that, they are to pay for him with his wergild, or to bring him back there.</item><item n="1.5">And if he steals after that, they are to pay for him with his wergild, whether to the king or to him to whom it rightly belongs; and everyone of those who supported him is to pay 120 shillings to the king as a fine.</item></list></item><item n="2">Concerning lordless men. And we pronounced about these lordless men, from whom no justice can be obtained, that one should order their kindred to fetch back such a person to justice and to find him a lord in public meeting. <list rend="numbered"><item n="2.1">And if they then will not, or cannot, produce him on that appointed day, he is then to be a fugitive afterwards, and he who encounters him is to strike him down as a thief.</item><item n="2.2">And he who harbours him after that, is to pay for him with his wergild or to clear himself by an oath of that amount.</item></list></item><item n="3">Concerning the refusal of justice. The lord who refuses justice and upholds his guilty man, so that the king is appealed to, is to repay the value of the goods and 120 shillings to the king; and he who appeals to the king before he demands justice as often as he ought, is to pay the same fine as the other would have done, if he had refused him justice. <list rend="numbered"><item n="3.1">And the lord who is an accessory to a theft by his slave, and it becomes known about him, is to forfeit the slave and be liable to his wergild on the first occasionp if he does it more often, he is to be liable to pay all that he owns.</item><item n="3.2">And likewise any of the king's treasurers or of our reeves, who has been an accessory of thieves who have committed theft, is to liable to the same.</item></list></item><item n="4">Concerning treachery to a lord. And we have pronounced concerning treachery to a lord, that he [who is accused] is to forfeit his life if he cannot deny it or is afterwards convicted at the three-fold ordeal.</item></list></div1>
Note that nested lists have been used so the tagging mirrors the structure indicated by the two-level numbering of the clauses. The clauses could have been treated as a one-level list with irregular numbering, if desired.
Example
<p>These decrees, most blessed Pope Hadrian, we propounded in the public council ... and they confirmed them in our hand in your stead with the sign of the Holy Cross, and afterwards inscribed with a careful pen on the paper of this page, affixing thus the sign of the Holy Cross. <list rend="simple"><item>I, Eanbald, by the grace of God archbishop of the holy church of York, have subscribed to the pious and catholic validity of this document with the sign of the Holy Cross.</item><item>I, Ælfwold, king of the people across the Humber, consenting have subscribed with the sign of the Holy Cross.</item><item>I, Tilberht, prelate of the church of Hexham, rejoicing have subscribed with the sign of the Holy Cross.</item><item>I, Higbald, bishop of the church of Lindisfarne, obeying have subscribed with the sign of the Holy Cross.</item><item>I, Ethelbert, bishop of Candida Casa, suppliant, have subscribed with thef sign of the Holy Cross.</item><item>I, Ealdwulf, bishop of the church of Mayo, have subscribed with devout will.</item><item>I, Æthelwine, bishop, have subscribed through delegates.</item><item>I, Sicga, patrician, have subscribed with serene mind with the sign of the Holy Cross.</item></list></p>
<listBibl>
<listBibl> (citation list) contains a list of bibliographic citations of any kind.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.declarable (@default) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Example
<listBibl><head>Works consulted</head><bibl>Blain, Clements and Grundy: Feminist Companion to Literature in English (Yale, 1990) </bibl><biblStruct><analytic><title>The Interesting story of the Children in the Wood</title></analytic><monogr><title>The Penny Histories</title><author>Victor E Neuberg</author><imprint><publisher>OUP</publisher><date>1968</date></imprint></monogr></biblStruct></listBibl>
<listEvent>
<listEvent> (list of events) contains a list of descriptions, each of which provides information about an identifiable event.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declarable (@default) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<listEvent><head>Battles of the American Civil War: Kentucky</head><event xml:id="event01" when="1861-09-19"><label>Barbourville</label><desc>The Battle of Barbourville was one of the early engagements of the American Civil War. It occurred September 19, 1861, in Knox County, Kentucky during the campaign known as the Kentucky Confederate Offensive. The battle is considered the first Confederate victory in the commonwealth, and threw a scare into Federal commanders, who rushed troops to central Kentucky in an effort to repel the invasion, which was finally thwarted at the <ref target="#event02">Battle of Camp Wildcat</ref> in October.</desc></event><event xml:id="event02" when="1861-10-21"><label>Camp Wild Cat</label><desc>The Battle of Camp Wildcat (also known as Wildcat Mountain and Camp Wild Cat) was one of the early engagements of the American Civil War. It occurred October 21, 1861, in northern Laurel County, Kentucky during the campaign known as the Kentucky Confederate Offensive. The battle is considered one of the very first Union victories, and marked the first engagement of troops in the commonwealth of Kentucky.</desc></event><event xml:id="event03" from="1864-06-11" to="1864-06-12"><label>Cynthiana</label><desc>The Battle of Cynthiana (or Kellar’s Bridge) was an engagement during the American Civil War that was fought on June 11 and 12, 1864, in Harrison County, Kentucky, near the town of Cynthiana. A part of Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan's 1864 Raid into Kentucky, the battle resulted in a victory by Union forces over the raiders and saved the town from capture.</desc></event></listEvent>
<listPerson>
<listPerson> (list of persons) contains a list of descriptions, each of which provides information about an identifiable person or a group of people, for example the participants in a language interaction, or the people referred to in a historical source.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declarable (@default) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<listPerson type="respondents"><personGrp xml:id="PXXX"/><person xml:id="P1234" sex="2" age="mid"/><person xml:id="P4332" sex="1" age="mid"/><listRelation><relation type="personal" name="spouse" mutual="#P1234 #P4332"/></listRelation></listPerson>
<listPlace>
<listPlace> (list of places) contains a list of places, optionally followed by a list of relationships (other than containment) defined amongst them.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declarable (@default) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Example
<listPlace type="offshoreIslands"><place><placeName>La roche qui pleure</placeName></place><place><placeName>Ile aux cerfs</placeName></place></listPlace>
<listRelation>
<listRelation> provides information about relationships identified amongst people, places, and organizations, either informally as prose or as formally expressed relation links.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

May contain a prose description organized as paragraphs, or a sequence of <relation> elements.

Example
<listPerson><person xml:id="pp1"><!-- data about person pp1 --></person><person xml:id="pp2"><!-- data about person pp1 --></person><!-- more person (pp3, pp4) elements here --><listRelation type="personal"><relation name="parent" active="#pp1 #pp2" passive="#pp3 #pp4"/><relation name="spouse" mutual="#pp1 #pp2"/></listRelation><listRelation type="social"><relation name="employer" active="#pp1" passive="#pp3 #pp5 #pp6 #pp7"/></listRelation></listPerson>
The persons with identifiers pp1 and pp2 are the parents of pp3 and pp4; they are also married to each other; pp1 is the employer of pp3, pp5, pp6, and pp7.
Example
<listPerson><person xml:id="en_pp1"><!-- data about person en_pp1 --></person><person xml:id="en_pp2"><!-- data about person en_pp2 --></person><!-- more person (en_pp3, en_pp4) elements here --></listPerson><listPlace><place xml:id="en_pl1"><!-- data about place en_pl1 --></place><!-- more place (en_pl2, en_pl3) elements here --></listPlace><listRelation><relation name="residence" active="#en_pp1 #en_pp2" passive="#en_pl1"/></listRelation>
The persons with identifiers en_pp1 and en_pp2 live in en_pl1.
Example
<listRelation><p>All speakers are members of the Ceruli family, born in Naples.</p></listRelation>
<listWit>
<listWit> (witness list) lists definitions for all the witnesses referred to by a critical apparatus, optionally grouped hierarchically.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<listWit><witness xml:id="HL26">Ellesmere, Huntingdon Library 26.C.9</witness><witness xml:id="PN392">Hengwrt, National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, Peniarth 392D</witness><witness xml:id="RP149">Bodleian Library Rawlinson Poetic 149 (see further <ptr target="#MSRP149"/>)</witness></listWit>
<locus>
<locus> defines a location within a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object typically as a (possibly discontinuous) sequence of folio references.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@schemeidentifies the foliation scheme in terms of which the location is being specified by pointing to some <foliation> element defining it, or to some other equivalent resource.
@fromspecifies the starting point of the location in a normalized form, typically a page number.
@tospecifies the end-point of the location in a normalized form, typically as a page number.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<!-- within ms description --><msItem n="1"><locus target="#F1r #F1v #F2r" from="1r" to="2r">ff. 1r-2r</locus><author>Ben Jonson</author><title>Ode to himself</title><rubric rend="italics"> An Ode<lb/> to him selfe.</rubric><incipit>Com leaue the loathed stage</incipit><explicit>And see his chariot triumph ore his wayne.</explicit><bibl><name>Beal</name>, <title>Index 1450-1625</title>, JnB 380</bibl></msItem><!-- within transcription ... --><pb xml:id="F1r"/><!-- ... --><pb xml:id="F1v"/><!-- ... --><pb xml:id="F2r"/><!-- ... -->
ExampleThe @facs attribute is available globally when the transcr module is included in a schema. It may be used to point directly to an image file, as in the following example:
<msItem><locus facs="images/08v.jpg images/09r.jpg images/09v.jpg images/10r.jpg images/10v.jpg">fols. 8v-10v</locus><title>Birds Praise of Love</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>1506</biblScope></bibl></msItem>
<measure>
<measure> contains a word or phrase referring to some quantity of an object or commodity, usually comprising a number, a unit, and a commodity name.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.measurement (unit, quantity, @unitRef, @commodity)
@unitspecifies the unit.
Legal values are:
  • crown
  • farthing
  • groat
  • guinea
  • halfCrown
  • halfGroat
  • pence
  • pound
  • shilling
  • ounce
  • grain
  • pennyweight
  • mark
@quantityspecifies the number of the specified units that comprise the measurement
@typespecifies the type of measurement.
Legal values are:
  • currency
  • weight
Example
<measure xml:id="p1" type="currency" quantity="10" unit="shilling">10</measure>/<measure xml:id="p2" type="currency" quantity="5" unit="pence">5</measure><link type="currencyBritish" target="#p1 #p2"/>
Example
<cell><measure xml:id="p1" type="weight" quantity="00120" unit="pound">00120</measure>:</cell><cell><measure xml:id="p2" type="weight" quantity="01" unit="ounce">01</measure></cell><cell><measure xml:id="p3" type="weight" quantity="05" unit="pennyweight">05</measure></cell><cell><measure xml:id="p4" type="weight" quantity="00" unit="grain">00</measure><link type="weightBritish" target="#p1 #p2 #p3 #p4"/></cell>
<metamark>
<metamark> contains or describes any kind of graphic or written signal within a document the function of which is to determine how it should be read rather than forming part of the actual content of the document.
Attributesatt.spanning (@spanTo) att.placement (@place) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
@functiondescribes the function (for example status, insertion, deletion, transposition) of the metamark.
@targetidentifies one or more elements to which the metamark applies.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<surface><metamark function="used" rend="line" target="#X2"/><zone xml:id="zone-X2"><line>I am that halfgrown <add>angry</add> boy, fallen asleep</line><line>The tears of foolish passion yet undried</line><line>upon my cheeks.</line><!-- ... --><line>I pass through <add>the</add> travels and <del>fortunes</del> of <retrace>thirty</retrace></line><line>years and become old,</line><line>Each in its due order comes and goes,</line><line>And thus a message for me comes.</line><line>The</line></zone><metamark function="used" target="#zone-X2">Entered - Yes</metamark></surface>
<monogr>
<monogr> (monographic level) contains bibliographic elements describing an item (e.g. a book or journal) published as an independent item (i.e. as a separate physical object).
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<biblStruct><analytic><author>Chesnutt, David</author><title>Historical Editions in the States</title></analytic><monogr><title level="j">Computers and the Humanities</title><imprint><date when="1991-12">(December, 1991):</date></imprint><biblScope>25.6</biblScope><biblScope unit="page" from="377" to="380">377–380</biblScope></monogr></biblStruct>
Example
<biblStruct type="book"><monogr><author><persName><forename>Leo Joachim</forename><surname>Frachtenberg</surname></persName></author><title type="main" level="m">Lower Umpqua Texts</title><imprint><pubPlace>New York</pubPlace><publisher>Columbia University Press</publisher><date>1914</date></imprint></monogr><series><title type="main" level="s">Columbia University Contributions to Anthropology</title><biblScope unit="volume">4</biblScope></series></biblStruct>
<msContents>
<msContents> (manuscript contents) describes the intellectual content of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object either as a series of paragraphs or as a series of structured manuscript items.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.msExcerpt (@defective) att.msClass (@class)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msContents class="#sermons"><p>A collection of Lollard sermons</p></msContents>
Example
<msContents><msItem n="1"><locus>fols. 5r-7v</locus><title>An ABC</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>239</biblScope></bibl></msItem><msItem n="2"><locus>fols. 7v-8v</locus><title xml:lang="frm">Lenvoy de Chaucer a Scogan</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>3747</biblScope></bibl></msItem><msItem n="3"><locus>fol. 8v</locus><title>Truth</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>809</biblScope></bibl></msItem><msItem n="4"><locus>fols. 8v-10v</locus><title>Birds Praise of Love</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>1506</biblScope></bibl></msItem><msItem n="5"><locus>fols. 10v-11v</locus><title xml:lang="la">De amico ad amicam</title><title xml:lang="la">Responcio</title><bibl><title>IMEV</title><biblScope>16 & 19</biblScope></bibl></msItem><msItem n="6"><locus>fols. 14r-126v</locus><title>Troilus and Criseyde</title><note>Bk. 1:71-Bk. 5:1701, with additional losses due to mutilation throughout</note></msItem></msContents>
<msDesc>
<msDesc> (manuscript description) contains a description of a single identifiable manuscript or other text-bearing object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declaring (@decls) att.docStatus (@status)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msDesc><msIdentifier><settlement>Oxford</settlement><repository>Bodleian Library</repository><idno type="Bod">MS Poet. Rawl. D. 169.</idno></msIdentifier><msContents><msItem><author>Geoffrey Chaucer</author><title>The Canterbury Tales</title></msItem></msContents><physDesc><objectDesc><p>A parchment codex of 136 folios, measuring approx 28 by 19 inches, and containing 24 quires.</p><p>The pages are margined and ruled throughout.</p><p>Four hands have been identified in the manuscript: the first 44 folios being written in two cursive anglicana scripts, while the remainder is for the most part in a mixed secretary hand.</p></objectDesc></physDesc></msDesc>
<msFrag>
<msFrag> (manuscript fragment) contains information about a fragment described in relation to a prior context, typically as a description of a virtual reconstruction of a manuscript or other object whose fragments were catalogued separately
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msDesc><msIdentifier><msName xml:lang="la">Codex Suprasliensis</msName></msIdentifier><msFrag><msIdentifier><settlement>Ljubljana</settlement><repository>Narodna in univerzitetna knjiznica</repository><idno>MS Kopitar 2</idno></msIdentifier><msContents><summary>Contains ff. 10 to 42 only</summary></msContents></msFrag><msFrag><msIdentifier><settlement>Warszawa</settlement><repository>Biblioteka Narodowa</repository><idno>BO 3.201</idno></msIdentifier></msFrag><msFrag><msIdentifier><settlement>Sankt-Peterburg</settlement><repository>Rossiiskaia natsional'naia biblioteka</repository><idno>Q.p.I.72</idno></msIdentifier></msFrag></msDesc>
<msIdentifier>
<msIdentifier> (manuscript identifier) contains the information required to identify the manuscript or similar object being described.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msIdentifier><settlement>San Marino</settlement><repository>Huntington Library</repository><idno>MS.El.26.C.9</idno></msIdentifier>
<msItem>
<msItem> (manuscript item) describes an individual work or item within the intellectual content of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.msExcerpt (@defective) att.msClass (@class)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msItem class="#saga"><locus>ff. 1r-24v</locus><title>Agrip af Noregs konunga sögum</title><incipit>regi oc h<ex>ann</ex> setiho <gap reason="illegible" extent="7"/>sc heim se<ex>m</ex> þio</incipit><explicit>h<ex>on</ex> hev<ex>er</ex><ex>oc</ex>þa buit hesta .ij. aNan viþ fé enh<ex>on</ex>o<ex>m</ex> aNan til reiþ<ex>ar</ex></explicit><textLang mainLang="non">Old Norse/Icelandic</textLang></msItem>
<msItemStruct>
<msItemStruct> (structured manuscript item) contains a structured description for an individual work or item within the intellectual content of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.msExcerpt (@defective) att.msClass (@class)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msItemStruct n="2" defective="false" class="#biblComm"><locus from="24v" to="97v">24v-97v</locus><author>Apringius de Beja</author><title type="uniform" xml:lang="la">Tractatus in Apocalypsin</title><rubric>Incipit Trac<supplied reason="omitted">ta</supplied>tus in apoka<lb/>lipsin eruditissimi uiri <lb/> Apringi ep<ex>iscop</ex>i Pacensis eccl<ex>esi</ex>e</rubric><finalRubric>EXPLIC<ex>IT</ex> EXPO<lb/>SITIO APOCALIPSIS QVA<ex>M</ex> EXPOSVIT DOM<lb/>NVS APRINGIUS EP<ex>ISCOPU</ex>S. DEO GR<ex>ACI</ex>AS AGO. FI<lb/>NITO LABORE ISTO.</finalRubric><bibl><ref target="http://amiBibl.xml#Apringius1900">Apringius</ref>, ed. Férotin</bibl><textLang mainLang="la">Latin</textLang></msItemStruct>
<msName>
<msName> (alternative name) contains any form of unstructured alternative name used for a manuscript or other object, such as an ocellus nominum, or nickname.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msName>The Vercelli Book</msName>
<msPart>
<msPart> (manuscript part) contains information about an originally distinct manuscript or part of a manuscript, which is now part of a composite manuscript.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msPart><msIdentifier><idno>A</idno><altIdentifier type="catalog"><collection>Becker</collection><idno>48, Nr. 145</idno></altIdentifier><altIdentifier type="catalog"><collection>Wiener Liste</collection><idno>4°5</idno></altIdentifier></msIdentifier><head><title xml:lang="la">Gregorius: Homiliae in Ezechielem</title><origPlace key="tgn_7008085">Weissenburg (?)</origPlace><origDate notBefore="0801" notAfter="0815">IX. Jh., Anfang</origDate></head></msPart>
Example
<msDesc><msIdentifier><settlement>Amiens</settlement><repository>Bibliothèque Municipale</repository><idno>MS 3</idno><msName>Maurdramnus Bible</msName></msIdentifier><msContents><summary xml:lang="lat">Miscellany of various texts; Prudentius, Psychomachia; Physiologus de natura animantium</summary><textLang mainLang="lat">Latin</textLang></msContents><physDesc><objectDesc form="composite_manuscript"/></physDesc><msPart><msIdentifier><idno>ms. 10066-77 ff. 140r-156v</idno></msIdentifier><msContents><summary xml:lang="lat">Physiologus</summary><textLang mainLang="lat">Latin</textLang></msContents></msPart><msPart><msIdentifier><altIdentifier><idno>MS 6</idno></altIdentifier></msIdentifier><!-- other information specific to this part here --></msPart><!-- more parts here --></msDesc>
<name>
<name> (name, proper noun) contains a proper noun or noun phrase.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<name type="person">Thomas Hoccleve</name><name type="place">Villingaholt</name><name type="org">Vetus Latina Institut</name><name type="person" ref="#HOC001">Occleve</name>
<normalization>
<normalization> indicates the extent of normalization or regularization of the original source carried out in converting it to electronic form.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
@methodindicates the method adopted to indicate normalizations within the text.
Legal values are:
  • silent
  • markup
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<editorialDecl xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><normalization method="markup"><p>Where both upper- and lower-case i, j, u, v, and vv have been normalized, to modern 20th century typographical practice, the <gi>choice</gi> element has been used to enclose <gi>orig</gi> and <gi>reg</gi> elements giving the original and new values respectively. ...</p></normalization><normalization method="silent"><p>Spacing between words and following punctuation has been regularized to zero spaces; spacing between words has been regularized to one space.</p></normalization><normalization source="http://www.dict.sztaki.hu/webster"><p>Spelling converted throughout to Modern American usage, based on Websters 9th Collegiate dictionary.</p></normalization></editorialDecl>
<note>
<note> contains a note or annotation, or an editorial comment on the text.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (n, @xml:id, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.change (@change) att.global.responsibility (resp, @cert) att.global.source (@source) att.pointing (target, @targetLang, @evaluate) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@n(number) refers to the letter, numeral or symbol (encoded as an entity if it is a symbol) functioning as a note indicator in the original text. It is only used in transcriptions from print and is not needed if there is no note indicator in the original.
@resp(responsible party) indicates the editor responsible for the note. Only used in <note type="editorial">.
@placedescribes where the note physically appears (only required in transcription of manuscript notes). This is different from the point of reference of the note, which is indicated by <anchor>. Values include: “marginRight”, “marginLeft”, “top”, “topLeft”, “bottom”, “bottomRight”, “p041v-lower” (further down f. 41v) etc., “p041v-higher” etc., or @xml:id value of the page it is on if it is on a different page from its point of reference, plus, in the last case, any of the foregoing if it is not in the main body of the page. For instance, <note place="p083r-marginLeft"> means the note appears in the left margin of f. 83r but its point of reference is not on f. 83r. If the note is not all in one place, two or more @place values can be entered, separated by single spaces, as for <add>. But <note place="p083r-marginLeft"> has a hyphen rather than a space because both values apply simultaneously.
Suggested values include:
  • bottom
  • bottomCenter
  • bottomLeft
  • bottomRight
  • lineBeginning
  • lineEnd
  • marginLeft
  • marginRight
  • pageBottom
  • pageTop
  • paragraphEnd
  • supralinear
  • top
  • topCenter
  • topLeft
  • topRight
@targetpoints to the @xml:id value of the relevant <anchor> (q.v.), prefixed by a hash character (#). It is only required only in transcriptions of manuscript materials.
@typedescribes the type of note. The only acceptable value that editors should use “editorial” - used for a significant explanatory or codicological note by the editor. It will not normally be used by transcribers unless given prior clearance by an editor: transcriber's comments on the text should otherwise be confined to XML comments. No @type value is needed for annotations that actually feature in the document. No other values should be used as they are either only present in the text transcriptions of certain older documents or their use is confined solely to the header.
Legal values are:
  • editorial
  • imageLink
  • relatedmaterial
  • scopecontent
@handcode for the person who has added the note (see Name Codes). Only needed if the note is in a different hand from that of the main text.
@anchoredindicates whether the copy text shows the exact place of reference for the note.
Defaulttrue
Note

In modern texts, notes are usually anchored by means of explicit footnote or endnote symbols. An explicit indication of the phrase or line annotated may however be used instead (e.g. page 218, lines 3–4). The @anchored attribute indicates whether any explicit location is given, whether by symbol or by prose cross-reference. The value true indicates that such an explicit location is indicated in the copy text; the value false indicates that the copy text does not indicate a specific place of attachment for the note. If the specific symbols used in the copy text at the location the note is anchored are to be recorded, use the @n attribute.

@targetEndpoints to the end of the span to which the note is attached, if the note is not embedded in the text at that point.
Note

This attribute is retained for backwards compatibility; it may be removed at a subsequent release of the Guidelines. The recommended way of pointing to a span of elements is by means of the range function of XPointer, as further described in .

Note

<note>s should be transcribed at the point in the text to which they refer, and in the case of manuscript notes immediately after their <anchor> (see the examples above under <anchor>). If it is not clear what a note refers to, put it where you think best and point the problem out in a TRANSC comment.

In transcriptions from manuscript, any note indicators should themselves be transcribed, both where they appear in the text and where they appear (if they do) in the <note>s. In transcriptions from print, they should simply be recorded as the @n value of <note>.

It is theoretically permissible to assign more than one <note> to a given <anchor> (i.e. give two separate <note>s the same @target value), though this has never yet arisen in practice. More importantly, Newton quite often has two or more points of reference for a single note (e.g. if he quotes the same work two or more times in rapid succession, or includes references to a single note in multiple drafts of a given passage). In such cases, give each <anchor> a unique @xml:id value (as explained above under <anchor>), transcribe the note immediately after the first <anchor>, and give the <note> two or more @target values, separated by single spaces, corresponding to the @xml:id values of the <anchor>s that refer to it, e.g. <note target="#n015r-01 #n015r-03 #n015r-04">. (This may sound impossibly complicated, but will hopefully make sense if you encounter the situation in real life.)

If necessary, <note> can be divided into <p>s (paragraphs), even if this means that one nests indirectly inside another, thus: ‘<p>... <anchor/><note><p>...</p><p>...</p></note> ...</p>’. Normally, however, the text of the note goes directly inside <note>.

If necessary (as it occasionally but very rarely is), <note> may nest within <note>.

ExampleIn the following example, the translator has supplied a footnote containing an explanation of the term translated as "painterly":
And yet it is not only in the great line of Italian renaissance art, but even in the painterly <note place="bottom" type="gloss" resp="#MDMH"><term xml:lang="de">Malerisch</term>. This word has, in the German, two distinct meanings, one objective, a quality residing in the object, the other subjective, a mode of apprehension and creation. To avoid confusion, they have been distinguished in English as <mentioned>picturesque</mentioned> and <mentioned>painterly</mentioned> respectively.</note> style of the Dutch genre painters of the seventeenth century that drapery has this psychological significance. <!-- elsewhere in the document --><respStmt xml:id="MDMH"><resp>translation from German to English</resp><name>Hottinger, Marie Donald Mackie</name></respStmt>
For this example to be valid, the code MDMH must be defined elsewhere, for example by means of a responsibility statement in the associated TEI header.
ExampleThe global @n attribute may be used to supply the symbol or number used to mark the note's point of attachment in the source text, as in the following example:
Mevorakh b. Saadya's mother, the matriarch of the family during the second half of the eleventh century, <note n="126" anchored="true"> The alleged mention of Judah Nagid's mother in a letter from 1071 is, in fact, a reference to Judah's children; cf. above, nn. 111 and 54.</note> is well known from Geniza documents published by Jacob Mann.
However, if notes are numbered in sequence and their numbering can be reconstructed automatically by processing software, it may well be considered unnecessary to record the note numbers.
<notesStmt>
<notesStmt> (notes statement) collects together any notes providing information about a text additional to that recorded in other parts of the bibliographic description.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<notesStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><note>Historical commentary provided by Mark Cohen</note><note>OCR scanning done at University of Toronto</note></notesStmt>
<newtonSymbol>
<newtonSymbol> (deprecated) describes a non-standard character, i.e. anything other than the Roman alphabet, Roman or Arabic numerals, standard punctuation marks and anything covered by the Entity Set. Contains a succinct natural-language description of the character.
Namespacehttp://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/ns/nonTEI
AttributesAttributes
@value
Note

A certain amount of creativity on the transcriber's part is permissible in describing such symbols, but try to keep as closely as possible to the methodology outlined above. Above all, be consistent: do not refer to the same thing as "circle surmounted by a cross" in one place and "cross underneath a circle" in another. And do not try to use ASCII characters or special fonts.

If two or more asterisks (or whatever) function as a single symbol, treat them as such rather than as separate symbols. For example:

The standard punctuation marks that are OK are these:

. , ; : ? ! ' " ( ) { } / \ ~

and ‘-’, if it is functioning as a ‘hard’ hyphen (i.e. a hyphen that is actually intended to appear in the text, as in ’Baden-Powell’ or ‘IdolTemples’, as opposed to one that merely marks a line break in mid-word): if it functions as a dash, encode it as ‘dash’. Any other symbol not covered by the Entity Set should be encoded as <newtonSymbol>, even if there is a character for it on your keyboard.

If faced with an alphabet other than the Roman, Greek or Hebrew (Greek and Hebrew are covered by the Entity Set), consult an editor.

The value of the namespace attribute (@xmlns) is always “http://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/ns/nonTEI". However, transcribers do not need to worry about this value: it will be automatically inserted by your text editor.

<num>
<num> (number) contains a number, written in any form.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@typeindicates the type of numeric value.
Suggested values include:
  • cardinal
  • ordinal
  • fraction
  • percentage
Note

If a different typology is desired, other values can be used for this attribute.

@valuesupplies the value of the number in standard form.
Valuesa numeric value.
Note

The standard form used is defined by the TEI datatype data.numeric.

Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<p>I reached <num type="cardinal" value="21">twenty-one</num> on my <num type="ordinal" value="21">twenty-first</num> birthday</p><p>Light travels at <num value="3E10">3×10<hi rend="sup">10</hi></num> cm per second.</p>
<objectDesc>
<objectDesc> contains a description of the physical components making up the object which is being described.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
@forma short project-specific name identifying the physical form of the carrier, for example as a codex, roll, fragment, partial leaf, cutting etc.
Note

Definitions for the terms used may typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<objectDesc form="codex"><supportDesc material="mixed"><p>Early modern <material>parchment</material> and <material>paper</material>.</p></supportDesc><layoutDesc><layout ruledLines="25 32"/></layoutDesc></objectDesc>
<occupation>
<occupation> contains an informal description of a person's trade, profession or occupation.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • primary
  • other
  • paid
  • unpaid
@schemeindicates the classification system or taxonomy in use, for example by supplying the identifier of a <taxonomy> element, or pointing to some other resource.
@codeidentifies an occupation code defined within the classification system or taxonomy defined by the @scheme attribute.
Note

The content of this element may be used as an alternative to the more formal specification made possible by its attributes; it may also be used to supplement the formal specification with commentary or clarification.

Example
<occupation>accountant</occupation>
Example
<occupation scheme="#occupationtaxonomy" code="#acc">accountant</occupation>
<opener>
<opener> groups together dateline, byline, salutation, and similar phrases appearing as a preliminary group at the start of a division, especially of a letter.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.written (@hand)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<opener><dateline>Walden, this 29. of August 1592</dateline></opener>
Example
<opener><dateline><name type="place">Great Marlborough Street</name><date>November 11, 1848</date></dateline><salute>My dear Sir,</salute></opener><p>I am sorry to say that absence from town and other circumstances have prevented me from earlier enquiring...</p>
<org>
<org> (organization) provides information about an identifiable organization such as a business, a tribe, or any other grouping of people.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.sortable (@sortKey)
@rolespecifies a primary role or classification for the organization.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, using arbitrary keywords such as artist, employer, family group, or political party, each of which should be associated with a definition. Such local definitions will typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

Example
<org xml:id="JAMs"><orgName>Justified Ancients of Mummu</orgName><desc>An underground anarchist collective spearheaded by <persName>Hagbard Celine</persName>, who fight the Illuminati from a golden submarine, the <name>Leif Ericson</name></desc><bibl><author>Robert Shea</author><author>Robert Anton Wilson</author><title>The Illuminatus! Trilogy</title></bibl></org>
<orgName>
<orgName> (organization name) contains an organizational name.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
About a year back, a question of considerable interest was agitated in the <orgName key="PAS1" type="voluntary"><placeName key="PEN">Pennsyla.</placeName> Abolition Society</orgName> [...]
<orig>
<orig> (original form) contains a conventional abbreviation involving a brevigraph (i.e. a textual mark of any sort standing in for a text string). It is used in parallel with <reg> (expanded form of the abbreviation), both of which are contained withing <choice>.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
Note

Normally, the abbreviated form will be represented by an entity (see Entity Set). The commonest brevigraph in both print and manuscript documents is the overline (a short horizontal line above a vowel, ‘n’, ‘m’, ‘y’ or ‘thorn’, indicating a following ‘m’ or ‘n’). The entities for overlined letters are ‘aover’, ‘eover’, ‘iover’, etc. ‘tail’ is a squiggle at the end of a Latin word normally meaning ‘ue’ after ‘q’ and ‘us’ after anything else. ‘sup9’ (which looks a lot like a superscript 9, hence the name) also stands for ‘us’ at the end of Latin words.

crossedp’ covers a number of variant forms of the letter ‘p’ with a line through its descender, and can variously mean ‘per’, ‘pre’, ‘par’, ‘pro’ or any other prefix beginning with ‘p’. If you come across a brevigraph that is not in the Entity Set, let us know and we will add it.

Since qtail is a particularly common abbreviation in Latin passages and always means the same thing, it has its own special entity ‘que’, which stands in for the full string ‘<choice><orig>q<ident>tail</ident></orig><reg>que</reg></choice>’.

The other brevigraph that occurs with some frequency is a line above a word or part of a word from which a more or less random selection of letters has been omitted. This is encoded as <hi rend="overline">, with the overlined section nesting inside <orig>.

If you are not sure how to expand a brevigraph, put in a TODO comment (or ask a senior editor) rather than guessing.

<reg> may take a @cert value (on a scale of ‘high’, ‘medium’ or ‘low’) if there is any remaining doubt as to the correct expansion of the brevigraph.

Example
Spirit<choice><orig><ident>sup9</ident></orig><reg>us</reg></choice> Sanct<choice><orig><ident>sup9</ident></orig><reg>us</reg></choice>
Example
it was <choice><orig><ident>crossedp</ident></orig><reg>pre</reg></choice>dicted
Example
as is co<choice><orig><ident>mover</ident></orig><reg>mm</reg></choice>only done
Example
opera <choice><orig><hi rend="overline">oia</hi></orig><reg>omnia</reg></choice>
Example
the heathen Ph<choice><orig><hi rend="overline">ers</hi></orig><reg>ilosophers</reg></choice>
<origDate>
<origDate> (origin date) contains any form of date, used to identify the date of origin for a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
AttributesAttributes
@n(number) Contains an integer value that is used to sort items that share the same date and whose relative order is known
@whendefines a specific sorting date
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<origDate notBefore="-0300" notAfter="-0200">3rd century BCE</origDate>
<origin>
<origin> contains any descriptive or other information concerning the origin of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<origin notBefore="1802" notAfter="1845" evidence="internal" resp="#AMH"> Copied in <name type="origPlace">Derby</name>, probably from an old Flemish original, between 1802 and 1845, according to <persName xml:id="AMH">Anne-Mette Hansen</persName>.</origin>
<origPlace>
<origPlace> (origin place) contains any form of place name, used to identify the place of origin for a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<origPlace>Birmingham</origPlace>
<p>
<p> (paragraph) marks paragraphs in prose.
Attributesatt.fragmentable (@part) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
@rend(rendition) Permitted values: “center”, “right” or “indent*”, * being replaced by the approximate number of spaces the first line is indented (i.e. the number of letters that would comfortably fit into the indent), in multiples of 5 up to a maximum of 40. Normally, paragraphs are indented by about five spaces: in these cases no attribute is needed. More pronounced indentation is indicated by indent10; no indentation at should have @rend coded as indent0. Not needed for minor variations in paragraph indentation, only for ones that really stand out.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • hangingIndent
  • indent0
  • indent5
  • indent10
  • indent15
  • indent20
  • indent25
  • indent30
  • indent35
  • indent40
  • insetLeft5
  • insetLeft10
  • insetLeft15
  • insetLeft20
  • insetLeft25
  • insetLeft30
  • insetLeft35
  • insetLeft40
Example
<p>Hallgerd was outside. <q>There is blood on your axe,</q> she said. <q>What have you done?</q></p><p><q>I have now arranged that you can be married a second time,</q> replied Thjostolf.</p><p><q>Then you must mean that Thorvald is dead,</q> she said.</p><p><q>Yes,</q> said Thjostolf. <q>And now you must think up some plan for me.</q></p>
<particDesc>
<particDesc> (participation description) describes the identifiable speakers, voices, or other participants in any kind of text or other persons named or otherwise referred to in a text, edition, or metadata.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<particDesc><listPerson><person xml:id="P-1234" sex="2" age="mid"><p>Female informant, well-educated, born in Shropshire UK, 12 Jan 1950, of unknown occupation. Speaks French fluently. Socio-Economic status B2.</p></person><person xml:id="P-4332" sex="1"><persName><surname>Hancock</surname><forename>Antony</forename><forename>Aloysius</forename><forename>St John</forename></persName><residence notAfter="1959"><address><street>Railway Cuttings</street><settlement>East Cheam</settlement></address></residence><occupation>comedian</occupation></person><listRelation><relation type="personal" name="spouse" mutual="#P-1234 #P-4332"/></listRelation></listPerson></particDesc>
This example shows both a very simple person description, and a very detailed one, using some of the more specialized elements from the module for Names and Dates.
<pb>
<pb> (page beginning) marks the beginning of a new page.
Attributesatt.typed (@type, @subtype) att.edition (@ed, @edRef) att.spanning (@spanTo) att.breaking (@break) att.global (xml:id, n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.change (@change) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source)
@xml:id(identifier) provides a unique identifier for the page. It is only required for transcriptions from manuscript or early modern print. Letter p followed immediately by the relevant page or folio number expressed as a three-digit string followed, if appropriate, by r (recto) or v (verso). Each <pb> must have its own unique @xml:id value within the document. If the document is not paginated or foliated, the best thing to do is to number the folios
001
,
002
, etc., and distinguish individual sides by following the number immediately with ‘r’ or ‘v’ to indicate recto and verso. Once you get past 9, drop the first leading zero:
010
,
011
, etc., and once past 99 drop leading zeros altogether:
100
,
101
, etc. Using microfilm images, however, it isn't always possible to be sure what is recto and what verso: if dealing with such a document, simply number the individual sides in the order they occur in and forget about ‘r’ and ‘v’ (and we will sort it out when we reach the check-against-original stage). If the document is paginated or foliated, follow the original numbering as far as possible, but if this involves giving two different pages the same @xml:id value, e.g. if two folios have both been numbered 24, call the first one “
p024r
” and “
p024v
” as normal, and the next one “
p024Ar
” and “
p024Av
”. If a folio number has got missed out, e.g. there is no f.24, follow the original foliation but comment on the omission in a CODIC comment.
@n(number) gives the same number as the @xml:id value but expressed in human-readable form with no preceding letter and no leading zeros, e.g. “
24v
” instead of “
p024v
”. (This generates the page number that users will actually see on their screens; the @xml:id value is purely for processing purposes.) In the case of modern print documents, the @n value is simply the original page number (this may have to be supplied if for instance the original edition does not show page numbers on the first page of each chapter).
Note

Some manuscripts have been given two or more completely unrelated sets of pagination or foliation: in these cases, when assigning @xml:id values to <pb>s, follow the one that seems most logical in terms of how the document is ordered now.

If <pb> is preceded and/or followed by <fw>, there should be no gap between these tags. If a word is split by a page break, the <pb> and any associated <fw> should sit directly in the middle of the word, with no space either side Otherwise there should be one space either side, unless the <pb> falls between divisions, paragraphs, line groups or lines of verse, in which case the spacing does not really matter.

Hyphens on partial words (including catchwords) preceding page breaks should be indicated by <lb type="hyphenated"/>.

It sometimes happens, usually in <addSpan> passages or <note>s, that the text moves onto the same page at two different points, each of which needs to be indicated by <pb>. In such cases, append a hyphen and a lower case letter to each <pb>'s @xml:id value to distinguish them, e.g. <pb xml:id="p354v-a"/>, <pb xml:id="p354v-b"/>, etc. The @n value, however, is simply “354v” in both cases.

In the more chaotic documents, particularly those that have been split up, reordered, repaginated and/or otherwise mucked about with at some point since 1727, assigning @xml:id values to <pb>s can be a very confusing business calling for an editorial decision. Do not hesitate to ask for help if you are not sure what to do.

ExamplePage numbers may vary in different editions of a text.
<p>... <pb n="145" ed="ed2"/><!-- Page 145 in edition "ed2" starts here --> ... <pb n="283" ed="ed1"/><!-- Page 283 in edition "ed1" starts here--> ...</p>
ExampleA page break may be associated with a facsimile image of the page it introduces by means of the @facs attribute
<body><pb n="1" facs="page1.png"/><!-- page1.png contains an image of the page; the text it contains is encoded here --><p><!-- ... --></p><pb n="2" facs="page2.png"/><!-- similarly, for page 2 --><p><!-- ... --></p></body>
<persName>
<persName> (personal name) contains a proper noun or proper-noun phrase referring to a person, possibly including one or more of the person's forenames, surnames, honorifics, added names, etc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<persName><forename>Edward</forename><forename>George</forename><surname type="linked">Bulwer-Lytton</surname>, <roleName>Baron Lytton of <placeName>Knebworth</placeName></roleName></persName>
<person>
<person> provides information about an identifiable individual, for example a participant in a language interaction, or a person referred to in a historical source.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.sortable (@sortKey)
@rolespecifies a primary role or classification for the person.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, using arbitrary keywords such as artist, employer, author, relative, or servant, each of which should be associated with a definition. Such local definitions will typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

@sexspecifies the sex of the person.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, or may refer to an external standard, such as vCard's sex property (in which M indicates male, F female, O other, N none or not applicable, U unknown), or the often used ISO 5218:2004 Representation of Human Sexes (in which 0 indicates unknown; 1 male; 2 female; and 9 not applicable, although the ISO standard is widely considered inadequate); cf. CETH's Recommendations for Inclusive Data Collection of Trans People .

@agespecifies an age group for the person.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, using arbitrary keywords such as infant, child, teen, adult, or senior, each of which should be associated with a definition. Such local definitions will typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<person sex="F" age="adult"><p>Female respondent, well-educated, born in Shropshire UK, 12 Jan 1950, of unknown occupation. Speaks French fluently. Socio-Economic status B2.</p></person>
Example
<person sex="intersex" role="god" age="immortal"><persName>Hermaphroditos</persName><persName xml:lang="grc">Ἑρμαφρόδιτος</persName></person>
Example
<person xml:id="Ovi01" sex="1" role="poet"><persName xml:lang="en">Ovid</persName><persName xml:lang="la">Publius Ovidius Naso</persName><birth when="-0044-03-20"> 20 March 43 BC <placeName><settlement type="city">Sulmona</settlement><country key="IT">Italy</country></placeName></birth><death notBefore="0017" notAfter="0018">17 or 18 AD <placeName><settlement type="city">Tomis (Constanta)</settlement><country key="RO">Romania</country></placeName></death></person>
<personGrp>
<personGrp> (personal group) describes a group of individuals treated as a single person for analytic purposes.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey)
@rolespecifies the role of this group of participants in the interaction.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, using arbitrary keywords such as movement, employers, relatives, or servants, each of which should be associated with a definition. Such local definitions will typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

@sexspecifies the sex of the participant group.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, or may refer to an external standard, such as vCard's sex property (in which M indicates male, F female, O other, N none or not applicable, U unknown), or the often used ISO 5218:2004 Representation of Human Sexes (in which 0 indicates unknown; 1 male; 2 female; and 9 not applicable, although the ISO standard is widely considered inadequate); cf. CETH's Recommendations for Inclusive Data Collection of Trans People . For a mixed group, a value such as "mixed" may also be supplied.

@agespecifies the age group of the participants.
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, using arbitrary keywords such as infant, child, teen, adult, or senior, each of which should be associated with a definition. Such local definitions will typically be provided by a <valList> element in the project schema specification.

@sizedescribes informally the size or approximate size of the group for example by means of a number and an indication of accuracy e.g. approx 200.
Note

May contain a prose description organized as paragraphs, or any sequence of demographic elements in any combination.

The global @xml:id attribute should be used to identify each speaking participant in a spoken text if the @who attribute is specified on individual utterances.

Example
<personGrp xml:id="pg1" role="audience" sex="mixed" size="approx 50"/>
<physDesc>
<physDesc> (physical description) contains a full physical description of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object optionally subdivided using more specialized elements from the model.physDescPart class.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<physDesc><objectDesc form="codex"><supportDesc material="perg"><support>Parchment.</support><extent>i + 55 leaves <dimensions scope="all" type="leaf" unit="inch"><height>7¼</height><width>5⅜</width></dimensions></extent></supportDesc><layoutDesc><layout columns="2">In double columns.</layout></layoutDesc></objectDesc><handDesc><p>Written in more than one hand.</p></handDesc><decoDesc><p>With a few coloured capitals.</p></decoDesc></physDesc>
<place>
<place> contains data about a geographic location
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Example
<place><country>Lithuania</country><country xml:lang="lt">Lietuva</country><place><settlement>Vilnius</settlement></place><place><settlement>Kaunas</settlement></place></place>
<placeName>
<placeName> contains an absolute or relative place name.
Attributesatt.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Example
<placeName><settlement>Rochester</settlement><region>New York</region></placeName>
Example
<placeName><geogName>Arrochar Alps</geogName><region>Argylshire</region></placeName>
Example
<placeName><measure>10 miles</measure><offset>Northeast of</offset><settlement>Attica</settlement></placeName>
<postscript>
<postscript> contains a postscript, e.g. to a letter.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.written (@hand)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<div type="letter"><opener><dateline><placeName>Rimaone</placeName><date when="2006-11-21">21 Nov 06</date></dateline><salute>Dear Susan,</salute></opener><p>Thank you very much for the assistance splitting those logs. I'm sorry about the misunderstanding as to the size of the task. I really was not asking for help, only to borrow the axe. Hope you had fun in any case.</p><closer><salute>Sincerely yours,</salute><signed>Seymour</signed></closer><postscript><label>P.S.</label><p>The collision occured on <date when="2001-07-06">06 Jul 01</date>.</p></postscript></div>
<profileDesc>
<profileDesc> (text-profile description) provides a detailed description of non-bibliographic aspects of a text, specifically the languages and sublanguages used, the situation in which it was produced, the participants and their setting.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<profileDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><langUsage><language ident="fr">French</language></langUsage><textDesc n="novel"><channel mode="w">print; part issues</channel><constitution type="single"/><derivation type="original"/><domain type="art"/><factuality type="fiction"/><interaction type="none"/><preparedness type="prepared"/><purpose type="entertain" degree="high"/><purpose type="inform" degree="medium"/></textDesc><settingDesc><setting><name>Paris, France</name><time>Late 19th century</time></setting></settingDesc></profileDesc>
<provenance>
<provenance> contains any descriptive or other information concerning a single identifiable episode during the history of a manuscript, manuscript part, or other object after its creation but before its acquisition.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<provenance>Listed as the property of Lawrence Sterne in 1788.</provenance><provenance>Sold at Sothebys in 1899.</provenance>
<ptr>
<ptr> (pointer) defines a pointer to another location.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate) att.internetMedia (@mimeType) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declaring (@decls) att.cReferencing (@cRef)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<ptr target="#p143 #p144"/><ptr target="http://www.tei-c.org"/><ptr cRef="1.3.4"/>
<publicationStmt>
<publicationStmt> (publication statement) groups information concerning the publication or distribution of an electronic or other text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<publicationStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><publisher>C. Muquardt </publisher><pubPlace>Bruxelles & Leipzig</pubPlace><date when="1846"/></publicationStmt>
Example
<publicationStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><publisher>Chadwyck Healey</publisher><pubPlace>Cambridge</pubPlace><availability><p>Available under licence only</p></availability><date when="1992">1992</date></publicationStmt>
Example
<publicationStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><publisher>Zea Books</publisher><pubPlace>Lincoln, NE</pubPlace><date>2017</date><availability><p>This is an open access work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.</p></availability><ptr target="http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/zeabook/55"/></publicationStmt>
<publisher>
<publisher> provides the name of the organization responsible for the publication or distribution of a bibliographic item.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<imprint><pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace><publisher>Clarendon Press</publisher><date>1987</date></imprint>
<pubPlace>
<pubPlace> (publication place) contains the name of the place where a bibliographic item was published.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<publicationStmt><publisher>Oxford University Press</publisher><pubPlace>Oxford</pubPlace><date>1989</date></publicationStmt>
<quote>
<quote> (quotation) contains a phrase or passage attributed by the narrator or author to some agency external to the text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.msExcerpt (@defective) att.notated (@notation)
Note

If a bibliographic citation is supplied for the source of a quotation, the two may be grouped using the <cit> element.

Example
Lexicography has shown little sign of being affected by the work of followers of J.R. Firth, probably best summarized in his slogan, <quote>You shall know a word by the company it keeps</quote><ref>(Firth, 1957)</ref>
<rdg>
<rdg> (reading) contains an alternative reading. Use for places where two or more alternative readings are placed one above the other, or to note variants between two versions of a text. The alternative <rdg>s must appear within <app> (q.v.), which serves to link the alternative readings, much as <choice> serves to link alternative renditions.
Attributesatt.textCritical (@type, @cause, @varSeq, @require) (att.written (@hand)) att.witnessed (@wit) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)
@placedescribes the location of the alternative reading using the same values as <add>, though in almost all cases one <rdg> will be “inline“ and other(s) “supralinear” and/or “infralinear”.
Suggested values include:
  • supralinear
  • infralinear
  • inline
  • interlinear
  • lineEnd
  • lineBeginning
  • marginRight
  • marginLeft
  • over
Note

Transcribers who are asked to note variant readings between exemplars will be given individual instruction. The instructions below apply only to cases where the original document itself offers variant readings.

Alternative readings usually happen in Biblical passages where Newton presumably feels the translation is open to question, or in passages of his own composition where he is keeping his options open about which of two synonyms to choose.

Use only for places where there is a clear intent on the author's part to present two alternative readings. If you are uncertain about a reading yourself, use <unclear> and note any plausible alternatives as variant <unclear>s in a <choice> tag (see <unclear> for further detail).

Example
And at that time shall Michael stand up the great Prince which <app type="authorial"><rdg place="inline">standeth for</rdg><rdg place="supralinear">is set over</rdg></app> the children of thy People
Example
wishing for a <app type="authorial"><rdg place="inline">benediction</rdg><rdg place="supralinear">blessing</rdg></app> & desiring to carry away the holy medicines of body & mind
<redo>
<redo> indicates one or more cancelled interventions in a document which have subsequently been marked as reaffirmed or repeated.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.spanning (@spanTo) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
@targetpoints to one or more elements representing the interventions which are being reasserted.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<line><redo hand="#g_t" target="#redo-1" cause="fix"/><mod xml:id="redo-1" rend="strikethrough" spanTo="#anchor-1" hand="#g_bl"/>Ihr hagren, triſten, krummgezog<mod rend="strikethrough">nen</mod>ener Nacken</line><line>Wenn ihr nur piepſet iſt die Welt ſchon matt.<anchor xml:id="anchor-1"/></line>
This encoding represents the following sequence of events:
  • "Ihr hagren, triſten, krummgezog nenener Nacken/ Wenn ihr nur piepſet iſt die Welt ſchon matt." is written
  • the redundant letters "nen" in "nenener" are deleted
  • the whole passage is deleted by hand g_bl using strikethrough
  • the deletion is reasserted by another hand (identified here as g_t)
<ref>
<ref> (reference) defines a reference to another location, possibly modified by additional text or comment.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.pointing (@targetLang, @target, @evaluate) att.internetMedia (@mimeType) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.declaring (@decls) att.cReferencing (@cRef)
Note

The @target and @cRef attributes are mutually exclusive.

Example
See especially <ref target="http://www.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/Texts/A02.xml#s2">the second sentence</ref>
Example
See also <ref target="#locution">s.v. <term>locution</term></ref>.
<reg>
<reg> (regularization) contains a reading which has been regularized or normalized in some sense. Used in parallel with <orig> and both are contained within a <choice> element. <orig> contains the conventional abbreviation whereas <reg> contains the expanded form of the abbreviation.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.editLike (evidence, @instant) att.typed (type, @subtype)
Example
Spirit<choice><orig><ident>sup9</ident></orig><reg>us</reg></choice>
<region>
<region> contains the name of an administrative unit such as a state, province, or county, larger than a settlement, but smaller than a country.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<placeName><region type="state" n="IL">Illinois</region></placeName>
<relatedItem>
<relatedItem> contains or references some other bibliographic item which is related to the present one in some specified manner, for example as a constituent or alternative version of it.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@targetpoints to the related bibliographic element by means of an absolute or relative URI reference
Note

If the @target attribute is used to reference the related bibliographic item, the element must be empty.

Example
<biblStruct xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron"><monogr><author>Shirley, James</author><title type="main">The gentlemen of Venice</title><imprint><pubPlace>New York</pubPlace><publisher>Readex Microprint</publisher><date>1953</date></imprint><extent>1 microprint card, 23 x 15 cm.</extent></monogr><series><title>Three centuries of drama: English, 1642–1700</title></series><relatedItem type="otherForm"><biblStruct><monogr><author>Shirley, James</author><title type="main">The gentlemen of Venice</title><title type="sub">a tragi-comedie presented at the private house in Salisbury Court by Her Majesties servants</title><imprint><pubPlace>London</pubPlace><publisher>H. Moseley</publisher><date>1655</date></imprint><extent>78 p.</extent></monogr></biblStruct></relatedItem></biblStruct>
<relation>
<relation> (relationship) describes any kind of relationship or linkage amongst a specified group of places, events, persons, objects or other items.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.canonical (@key, @ref) att.sortable (@sortKey) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@activeidentifies the active participants in a non-mutual relationship, or all the participants in a mutual one.
@mutualsupplies a list of participants amongst all of whom the relationship holds equally.
@namesupplies a name for the kind of relationship of which this is an instance.
Legal values are:
  • acquaintance
  • administrativeSubordinate
  • administrativeSuperior
  • adversary
  • agent
  • alchemist
  • ale-brewer
  • almsgiver
  • almsman
  • almswoman
  • almswoman_almsman
  • apothecary
  • apprentice
  • attorney
  • aunt
  • aunt/uncle
  • austringer
  • bailiff
  • baker
  • barber
  • beloved
  • bereavedSpouse
  • betrothed
  • bishopSuperior
  • boarder
  • brewer
  • brother
  • brother-in-law
  • bursar
  • butcher
  • butler
  • carer
  • carrier
  • carter
  • caterer
  • chamberlain
  • chambermaid
  • chaplainPastoral
  • chaplainRank
  • chapman
  • charge
  • cheeseMan
  • cheeseWoman
  • cheeseWoman_cheeseMman
  • child
  • childSoCalled
  • chimney-sweeper
  • clerk
  • clerkOfTheKitchen
  • clientFeePaying
  • clientPatronal
  • coachman
  • coalCarrier
  • colleague
  • college
  • collegeButler
  • collegeEmployee
  • collegeEmployer
  • collegeFellow
  • collegeHead
  • collegeMember
  • collegeServant
  • collegeStudent
  • collegeVice-president
  • commissarySubordinate
  • confederate
  • cook
  • cookmaid
  • cooper
  • corporation
  • counsellor
  • counterfeitDistributor
  • counterfeitReceiver
  • countryman
  • countrywoman
  • countrywoman/countryman
  • cowherd
  • creditor
  • crew
  • curatePastoral
  • curateRank
  • curateSubordinate
  • customer
  • dairymaid
  • daughter
  • daughter-in-law
  • daughter-in-law/son-in-law
  • daughterSoCalled
  • debtor
  • distiller
  • doctor
  • draper
  • driver
  • dryNurse
  • ecclesiasticalSubordinate
  • ecclesiasticalSuperior
  • employee
  • employeeSubordinate
  • employeeSuperior
  • employer
  • extortioner
  • extortionVictim
  • falconer
  • father
  • father-in-law
  • fatherSoCalled
  • firstCousin
  • fisher
  • fisherman
  • fisherwoman
  • footboy
  • footman
  • fowler
  • friend
  • gardener
  • glazier
  • godchild
  • goddaughter
  • godfather
  • godmother
  • godparent
  • godson
  • governessEducator
  • governessEmployee
  • grandchild
  • granddaughter
  • grandfather
  • grandmother
  • grandparent
  • grandson
  • groom
  • guardian
  • guest
  • half-brother
  • half-sibling
  • half-sister
  • headCook
  • headOfHousehold
  • horsekeeper
  • horseman
  • host
  • householdBrewer
  • householdMember
  • housekeeper
  • huntsman
  • husband
  • husbandman
  • husbandSoCalled
  • informee
  • informer
  • joiner
  • journeyman
  • keeper
  • keeperSuperior
  • kinsman
  • kinswoman
  • kinswoman_kinsman
  • kitchenBoy
  • landlady
  • landlord
  • lateHusband
  • lateSpouse
  • lateWife
  • launderer
  • laundry-maid
  • licensee
  • licensor
  • loader
  • lodger
  • maid
  • maltster
  • marshal
  • mason
  • master
  • medicalPractitioner
  • member
  • messenger
  • midwife
  • militaryCaptain
  • militarySubordinate
  • militarySuperior
  • miller
  • minister
  • mistress
  • mistress/master
  • molekeeper
  • mother
  • mother-in-law
  • mother-in-law/father-in-law
  • motherSoCalled
  • needlewoman
  • neighbour
  • nephew
  • nextDoorNeighbour
  • niece
  • niece/nephew
  • nurse
  • nursemaid
  • officer
  • ostler
  • owner
  • page
  • pantler
  • parent
  • parentSoCalled
  • parishioner
  • partner
  • pastoral charge
  • pasture-man
  • patient
  • patron
  • pensioner
  • pewterer
  • physician
  • ploughboy
  • ploughman
  • porter
  • postmaster
  • priest
  • prisoner
  • proctor
  • prosecuted
  • prosecuter
  • pupil
  • purse-bearer
  • receiverGeneral
  • rectorPastoral
  • rectorRank
  • registrar
  • representative
  • retainer
  • romanticPartner
  • saddler
  • schoolmasterEducator
  • schoolmasterEmployee
  • scullion
  • secretary
  • sergeantOfBuckhounds
  • servant
  • servantSubordinate
  • servantSuperior
  • serviceProvider
  • shepherd
  • sheriffSuperior
  • ship
  • shipCaptain
  • shipmaster
  • shipsPurser
  • sibling
  • silkman
  • sister
  • sister-in-law
  • sister-in-law/brother-in-law
  • solicitor
  • son
  • son-in-law
  • sonSoCalled
  • spouse
  • spouseSoCalled
  • stepchild
  • stepdaughter
  • stepfather
  • stepmother
  • stepparent
  • stepson
  • steward
  • subwarden
  • surgeon
  • swineherd
  • tailor
  • tapster
  • tasker
  • tenant
  • thief-taker
  • tithing-man
  • tutee
  • tutor
  • twin
  • uncle
  • under-butler
  • under-keeperSubordinate
  • under-sheriffSubordinate
  • underCook
  • university
  • universityMember
  • usher
  • vicarPastoral
  • vicarRank
  • waggoner
  • wainman
  • ward
  • wardrobeKeeper
  • warrener
  • widow
  • widower
  • wife
  • wifeSoCalled
  • woodman
  • woodward
  • workman
  • workwoman
  • workwoman_workman
  • wouldBeSweetheart
  • yeoman
@passiveidentifies the passive participants in a non-mutual relationship.
Note

Only one of the attributes @active and @mutual may be supplied; the attribute @passive may be supplied only if the attribute @active is supplied. Not all of these constraints can be enforced in all schema languages.

Example
<relation type="social" name="supervisor" active="#p1" passive="#p2 #p3 #p4"/>
This indicates that the person with identifier p1 is supervisor of persons p2, p3, and p4.
Example
<relation type="personal" name="friends" mutual="#p2 #p3 #p4"/>
This indicates that p2, p3, and p4 are all friends.
Example
<relation type="CRM" name="P89_falls_within" active="http://id.clarosnet.org/places/metamorphoses/place/italy-orvieto" passive="http://id.clarosnet.org/places/metamorphoses/country/IT"/>
This indicates that there is a relation, defined by CIDOC CRM, between two resources identified by URLs.
Example
<relation resp="http://viaf.org/viaf/44335536/" ref="http://purl.org/saws/ontology#isVariantOf" active="http://www.ancientwisdoms.ac.uk/cts/urn:cts:greekLit:tlg3017.Syno298.sawsGrc01:divedition.divsection1.o14.a107" passive="http://data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:greekLit:tlg0031.tlg002.perseus-grc1:9.35"/>
This example records a relationship, defined by the SAWS ontology, between a passage of text identified by a CTS URN, and a variant passage of text in the Perseus Digital Library, and assigns the identification of the relationship to a particular editor (all using resolvable URIs).
<repository>
<repository> contains the name of a repository within which manuscripts or other objects are stored, possibly forming part of an institution.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<msIdentifier><settlement>Oxford</settlement><institution>University of Oxford</institution><repository>Bodleian Library</repository><idno>MS. Bodley 406</idno></msIdentifier>
<residence>
<residence> describes a person's present or past places of residence.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • primary
  • secondary
  • temporary
  • permanent
Example
<residence>Childhood in East Africa and long term resident of Glasgow, Scotland.</residence>
Example
<residence notAfter="1997">Mbeni estate, Dzukumura region, Matabele land</residence><residence notBefore="1903" notAfter="1996"><placeName><settlement>Glasgow</settlement><region>Scotland</region></placeName></residence>
<resp>
<resp> (responsibility) contains a phrase describing the nature of a person's intellectual responsibility, or an organization's role in the production or distribution of a work.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<respStmt><resp ref="http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/relators/com.html">compiler</resp><name>Edward Child</name></respStmt>
<respStmt>
<respStmt> (statement of responsibility) supplies a statement of responsibility for the intellectual content of a text, edition, recording, or series, where the specialized elements for authors, editors, etc. do not suffice or do not apply. May also be used to encode information about individuals or organizations which have played a role in the production or distribution of a bibliographic work.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<respStmt><resp>transcribed from original ms</resp><persName>Claus Huitfeldt</persName></respStmt>
Example
<respStmt><resp>converted to XML encoding</resp><name>Alan Morrison</name></respStmt>
<restore>
<restore> indicates restoration of text to an earlier state by cancellation of an editorial or authorial marking or instruction.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
For I hate this <restore hand="#dhl" type="marginalStetNote"><del>my</del></restore> body
<retrace>
<retrace> contains a sequence of writing which has been retraced, for example by over-inking, to clarify or fix it.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.spanning (@spanTo) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

<revisionDesc>
<revisionDesc> (revision description) summarizes the revision history for a file.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.docStatus (@status)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<revisionDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" status="embargoed"><change when="1991-11-11" who="#LB"> deleted chapter 10</change></revisionDesc>
<roleName>
<roleName> contains a name component which indicates that the referent has a particular role or position in society, such as an official title or rank.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<persName><forename>William</forename><surname>Poulteny</surname><roleName>Earl of Bath</roleName></persName>
Example
<p>The <roleName role="#solicitor_general">S.G.</roleName> is the only national public official, including the Supreme Court justices, required by statute to be “learned in the law.”</p>
Example
<p><persName ref="#NJF"><roleName role="#solicitor_general">Solicitor General</roleName> Noel J. Francisco</persName>, representing the administration, asserted in rebuttal that there was nothing to disavow (...) <persName ref="#NJF">Francisco</persName> had violated the scrupulous standard of candor about the facts and the law that <roleName role="#solicitor_general">S.G.s</roleName>, in Republican and Democratic administrations alike, have repeatedly said they must honor.</p>
<row>
<row> contains one row of a table.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.tableDecoration (rows, cols, @role)
Example
<row role="data"><cell role="label">Classics</cell><cell>Idle listless and unimproving</cell></row>
<rs>
<rs> (referencing string) contains a general purpose name or referring string.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Example
<q>My dear <rs type="person">Mr. Bennet</rs>,</q> said <rs type="person">his lady</rs> to him one day, <q>have you heard that <rs type="place">Netherfield Park</rs> is let at last?</q>
<salute>
<salute> (salutation) contains a salutation or greeting prefixed to a foreword, dedicatory epistle, or other division of a text, or the salutation in the closing of a letter, preface, etc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.written (@hand)
Example
<salute>To all courteous mindes, that will voutchsafe the readinge.</salute>
<seg>
<seg> (arbitrary segment) represents any segmentation of text below the chunk level.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.segLike (@function) (att.datcat (@datcat, @valueDatcat)) (att.fragmentable (@part)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.written (@hand) att.notated (@notation)
Note

The <seg> element may be used at the encoder's discretion to mark any segments of the text of interest for processing. One use of the element is to mark text features for which no appropriate markup is otherwise defined. Another use is to provide an identifier for some segment which is to be pointed at by some other element—i.e. to provide a target, or a part of a target, for a <ptr> or other similar element.

Example
<seg>When are you leaving?</seg><seg>Tomorrow.</seg>
Example
<s><seg rend="caps" type="initial-cap">So father's only</seg> glory was the ballfield.</s>
Example
<seg type="preamble"><seg>Sigmund, <seg type="patronym">the son of Volsung</seg>, was a king in Frankish country.</seg><seg>Sinfiotli was the eldest of his sons ...</seg><seg>Borghild, Sigmund's wife, had a brother ... </seg></seg>
<settingDesc>
<settingDesc> (setting description) describes the setting or settings within which a language interaction takes place, or other places otherwise referred to in a text, edition, or metadata.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<settingDesc><p>Texts recorded in the Canadian Parliament building in Ottawa, between April and November 1988 </p></settingDesc>
<settlement>
<settlement> contains the name of a settlement such as a city, town, or village identified as a single geo-political or administrative unit.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<placeName><settlement type="town">Glasgow</settlement><region>Scotland</region></placeName>
<sex>
<sex> specifies the sex of a person.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typecharacterizes the element in some sense, using any convenient classification scheme or typology.
Sample values include:
  • explicit
  • implicit
@valuesupplies a coded value for sex
Note

Values for this attribute may be locally defined by a project, or may refer to an external standard, such as vCard's sex property (in which M indicates male, F female, O other, N none or not applicable, U unknown), or the often used ISO 5218:2004 Representation of Human Sexes (in which 0 indicates unknown; 1 male; 2 female; and 9 not applicable, although the ISO standard is widely considered inadequate); cf. CETH's Recommendations for Inclusive Data Collection of Trans People .

Note

As with other culturally-constructed traits such as age, the way in which this concept is described in different cultural contexts may vary. The normalizing attributes are provided only as an optional means of simplifying that variety to one or more external standards for purposes of interoperability, or project-internal taxonomies for consistency, and should not be used where that is inappropriate or unhelpful. The content of the element may be used to describe the intended concept in more detail, using plain text.

Example
<sex value="M">male</sex>
Example
<sex value="2">female</sex>
Example
<sex value="I">Intersex</sex>
Example
<sex value="TG F">Female (TransWoman)</sex>
<sic>
<sic> (Latin for thus or so) contains text that is faulty or judged to be faulty in some fashion. <sic> is used in tandem with <corr> (correction) and both are contained within a <choice> element. <sic> contains the faulty original text whereas <corr> contains what [you think] the author or scribe meant to put. See <corr>.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select)
Note

<sic> and <corr> (within <choice>) must be included even if it is blindingly obvious what it should be. To restore text that is missing because of manuscript damage or authorial or scribal absent-mindedness, use <supplied>, not <sic> and <corr>.

Both <sic> and <corr> should normally be applied to whole words, not just the bit of the word where the mistake occurs.

<sic> and <corr> should be used sparingly, for things that really are obvious mistakes, not to modernise or standardise the original spelling or punctuation. If in doubt, do not correct but mention your doubts in a TRANSC comment.

Example
the killing of the <lb/><choice><sic>the</sic><corr type="noText"/></choice> witnesses
(Yahuda 1.3)
Example
in <choice><sic>explaing<lb/>ing</sic><corr>explain<lb/>ing</corr></choice> how (according to Montanus) the son might suffer without the father
(Yahuda 15.7)
Example
the holy Ghost never reproves any nation under the notion of committing fornication beside the revolting Iews in the old <choice><sic>Testamen</sic><corr>Testament</corr></choice> & revolting Christians in the new
(Yahuda 1.3)
<signed>
<signed> (signature) contains the closing salutation, etc., appended to a foreword, dedicatory epistle, or other division of a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.written (@hand)
Example
<signed>Thine to command <name>Humph. Moseley</name></signed>
Example
<closer><signed>Sign'd and Seal'd, <list><item>John Bull,</item><item>Nic. Frog.</item></list></signed></closer>
<sourceDesc>
<sourceDesc> (source description) describes the source from which an electronic text was derived or generated, typically a bibliographic description in the case of a digitized text, or a phrase such as "born digital" for a text which has no previous existence.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<sourceDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><bibl><title level="a">The Interesting story of the Children in the Wood</title>. In <author>Victor E Neuberg</author>, <title>The Penny Histories</title>. <publisher>OUP</publisher><date>1968</date>.</bibl></sourceDesc>
Example
<sourceDesc xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><p>Born digital: no previous source exists.</p></sourceDesc>
<space>
<space> indicates where a significant amount of space is deliberately left blank in the text.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype) att.dimensions (unit, extent, @quantity, @precision, @scope) att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@cert(certainty) records your degree of certainty on whether the lacuna in the text is deliberate (e.g. in the case of what appears to be an incomplete interlinear or marginal insertion). Values are “high”, “medium” or “low”.
Legal values are:
  • high
  • medium
  • low
@unitgives the unit of measurement of the blank space. Values include “chars” (characters) and “words” (words) for horizontal space and “lines” for vertical space.
Legal values are:
  • chars
  • words
  • lines
@extentexpresses the amount of blank space giving a numeric value.
@dim(dimension) indicates whether the space is horizontal or vertical. Permitted values are “horizontal” and “vertical”.
Legal values are:
  • horizontal
  • vertical
Note

For irregular shapes in two dimensions, the value for this attribute should reflect the more important of the two dimensions. In conventional left-right scripts, a space with both vertical and horizontal components should be classed as vertical.

Note

Not permitted between <p>s or between <head> and <p>: has to be included in them.

Not needed if a page has only been partially written on, e.g. if a section ends halfway down a page and the text resumes on the next page, or if a page features two <addSpan> passages for insertion elsewhere at different points and there is a gap between them. Only use it for gaps that are there for a purpose, e.g. to make a heading stand out, to mark a break between subsections, or because Newton meant to add something later but never got round to it (which is easily the commonest reason for horizontal <space>s).

DO NOT use <space> to indicate the indentation of a line of verse or the first line of a paragraph: this should be recorded in the rend value of <l> or <p>.

Example
For by what was shewed in Posit <space dim="horizontal" unit="chars" extent="3"/> they were to rise after this head
(Yahuda 1.5)
Example
... kingdoms of the true religion, as the Visigothic the Ostrogothic the Vandalic <add place="supralinear" indicator="yes">the Burgundian the <space dim="horizontal" extent="unclear" cert="medium"/></add> & for some time the Suevian
(Yahuda 1.3)
<sponsor>
<sponsor> specifies the name of a sponsoring organization or institution.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<sponsor xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">Association for Computers and the Humanities</sponsor><sponsor xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude">Association for Computational Linguistics</sponsor><sponsor xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" ref="http://www.allc.org/">Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing</sponsor>
<subst>
<subst> (substitution) groups one or more deletions with one or more additions when the combination is to be regarded as a single intervention in the text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
Example
... are all included. <del hand="#RG">It is</del><subst><add>T</add><del>t</del></subst>he expressed
Example
that he and his Sister Miſs D — <lb/>who always lived with him, wd. be <subst><del>very</del><lb/><add>principally</add></subst> remembered in her Will.
Example
<ab>τ<subst><add place="above">ῶν</add><del>α</del></subst> συνκυρόντ<subst><add place="above">ων</add><del>α</del></subst> ἐργαστηρί<subst><add place="above">ων</add><del>α</del></subst></ab>
Example
<subst><del><gap reason="illegible" quantity="5" unit="character"/></del><add>apple</add></subst>
<summary>
<summary> contains an overview of the available information concerning some aspect of an item or object (for example, its intellectual content, history, layout, typography etc.) as a complement or alternative to the more detailed information carried by more specific elements.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<summary>This item consists of three books with a prologue and an epilogue. </summary>
Example
<typeDesc><summary>Uses a mixture of Roman and Black Letter types.</summary><typeNote>Antiqua typeface, showing influence of Jenson's Venetian fonts.</typeNote><typeNote>The black letter face is a variant of Schwabacher.</typeNote></typeDesc>
<supplied>
<supplied> indicates text supplied by the transcriber or editor where the original is illegible or missing for some reason but is recoverable (even if only conjecturally) from the context or by reference to another source.
Attributesatt.editLike (@evidence, @instant) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source) att.dimensions (unit, extent, @quantity, @precision, @scope) att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@cert(certainty) indicates the degree of certainty about the suggested restoration. Values are “high”, “medium” or “low”. The @cert attribute is only required if there is any doubt about the suggested restoration.
Legal values are:
  • high
  • medium
  • low
@reasonindicates the reason why the text needed to be supplied. Permitted values are: “illgblDel” (illegible deletion), “copy” (poor quality of the copy you're transcribing from), “damage” (manuscript damage, e.g. it is torn or has a hole in it - indicate the precise nature of the damage in the @agent attribute), “blot” (blotted), “blotDel” (text is obliterated by what could either be an accidental blot or a deliberate deletion), “smudge”, “over” (text is impossible to read because it is written over other text - if it is impossible to read because other text is written over it, it counts as “illgblDel”), “faded”, “foxed” (manuscript has gone brown or crozzly round the edges through age or damp), “hand” (if it is simply a case of bad handwriting), and “omitted” (if the author or scribe just missed something out).
Legal values are:
  • binding
  • blot
  • blotDel
  • copy
  • damage
  • del
  • editorialDecision
  • faded
  • faint
  • foxed
  • hand
  • illgbl
  • illgblDel
  • omitted
  • over
  • smudge
Note

In the case of text being supplied from another source, mention the source in an APP XML comment.

You may very well find that the manuscript you are transcribing serves in itself as a source of <supplied> text if it contains multiple drafts of the same passage. In this case simply reference the page from which you have taken the supplied text in an APP comment tag.

If a catchword is not repeated at the beginning of the following page, supply it, with the reason value “omitted”.

Example
Nor did Iulius Bishop of Rome know any thing of it whe<supplied reason="damage">n</supplied><!-- CODIC page edge is frayed - jy --><lb/>he wrote in defence of Athanasius
(Keynes 10)
Example
it was made known to all Egypt & cannot any longer <supplied reason="omitted">be</supplied> concealed
(Clark Ms.)
Example
the two Olive trees & two Candlesticks standing before the Go<supplied reason="copy">d</supplied><!-- APP supplied from Revelation 11:4 --><lb/> of the earth
(Yahuda 15.7)
Example
et una <fw type="catch" place="bottomRight">cum</fw><pb xml:id="p036r" n="36r"/><supplied reason="omitted">cum</supplied> basibus et capitellis 18 cub.
(Babson 434)
Example
he died at Constantinople <supplied reason="damage">in a bog-house</supplied><!-- APP supplied from Keynes Ms. 10 f. 1r --> miserably by <ident>the</ident> effusion of his bowels
(Clark Ms.)
<support>
<support> contains a description of the materials etc. which make up the physical support for the written part of a manuscript or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<objectDesc form="roll"><supportDesc><support>Parchment roll with <material>silk</material> ribbons.</support></supportDesc></objectDesc>
<supportDesc>
<supportDesc> (support description) groups elements describing the physical support for the written part of a manuscript or other object.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
@materiala short project-defined name for the material composing the majority of the support
Suggested values include:
  • paper
  • parch
  • mixed
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<supportDesc><support>Parchment roll with <material>silk</material> ribbons.</support></supportDesc>
<surface>
<surface> defines a written surface as a two-dimensional coordinate space, optionally grouping one or more graphic representations of that space, zones of interest within that space, and transcriptions of the writing within them.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.coordinated (@start, @ulx, @uly, @lrx, @lry, @points) att.declaring (@decls) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@attachmentdescribes the method by which this surface is or was connected to the main surface
Sample values include:
  • glued
  • pinned
  • sewn
@flippingindicates whether the surface is attached and folded in such a way as to provide two writing surfaces
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<facsimile><surface ulx="0" uly="0" lrx="200" lry="300"><graphic url="Bovelles-49r.png"/></surface></facsimile>
<surname>
<surname> contains a family (inherited) name, as opposed to a given, baptismal, or nick name.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.personal (@full, @sort) (att.naming (@role, @nymRef) (att.canonical (@key, @ref)) ) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<surname type="combine">St John Stevas</surname>
<surrogates>
<surrogates> contains information about any representations of the manuscript or other object being described which may exist in the holding institution or elsewhere.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<surrogates><bibl><title type="gmd">diapositive</title><idno>AM 74 a, fol.</idno><date>May 1984</date></bibl><bibl><title type="gmd">b/w prints</title><idno>AM 75 a, fol.</idno><date>1972</date></bibl></surrogates>
<table>
<table> contains text displayed in tabular form, in rows and columns.
AttributesAttributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@rend(rendition) indicates how the element in question was rendered or presented in the source text.
Legal values are:
  • right
  • left
  • center
  • borderAll
  • borderBottom
  • borderLeft
  • borderRight
  • borderSides
  • borderTop
  • vAlignMiddle
  • width05
  • width10
  • width15
  • width20
  • width25
  • width30
  • width33
  • width35
  • width40
  • width45
  • width50
  • width55
  • width60
  • width65
  • width66
  • width70
  • width75
  • width80
  • width85
  • width90
  • width95
  • width100
Note

Contains an optional heading and a series of rows.

Any rendition information should be supplied using the global @rend attribute, at the table, row, or cell level as appropriate.

Example
<table rows="4" cols="4"><head>Poor Men's Lodgings in Norfolk (Mayhew, 1843)</head><row role="label"><cell role="data"/><cell role="data">Dossing Cribs or Lodging Houses</cell><cell role="data">Beds</cell><cell role="data">Needys or Nightly Lodgers</cell></row><row role="data"><cell role="label">Bury St Edmund's</cell><cell role="data">5</cell><cell role="data">8</cell><cell role="data">128</cell></row><row role="data"><cell role="label">Thetford</cell><cell role="data">3</cell><cell role="data">6</cell><cell role="data">36</cell></row><row role="data"><cell role="label">Attleboro'</cell><cell role="data">3</cell><cell role="data">5</cell><cell role="data">20</cell></row><row role="data"><cell role="label">Wymondham</cell><cell role="data">1</cell><cell role="data">11</cell><cell role="data">22</cell></row></table>
<taxonomy>
<taxonomy> defines a typology either implicitly, by means of a bibliographic citation, or explicitly by a structured taxonomy.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<taxonomy xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" xml:id="tax.b"><bibl>Brown Corpus</bibl><category xml:id="tax.b.a"><catDesc>Press Reportage</catDesc><category xml:id="tax.b.a1"><catDesc>Daily</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.a2"><catDesc>Sunday</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.a3"><catDesc>National</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.a4"><catDesc>Provincial</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.a5"><catDesc>Political</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.a6"><catDesc>Sports</catDesc></category></category><category xml:id="tax.b.d"><catDesc>Religion</catDesc><category xml:id="tax.b.d1"><catDesc>Books</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tax.b.d2"><catDesc>Periodicals and tracts</catDesc></category></category></taxonomy>
Example
<taxonomy xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><category xml:id="literature"><catDesc>Literature</catDesc><category xml:id="poetry"><catDesc>Poetry</catDesc><category xml:id="sonnet"><catDesc>Sonnet</catDesc><category xml:id="shakesSonnet"><catDesc>Shakespearean Sonnet</catDesc></category><category xml:id="petraSonnet"><catDesc>Petrarchan Sonnet</catDesc></category></category><category xml:id="haiku"><catDesc>Haiku</catDesc></category></category><category xml:id="drama"><catDesc>Drama</catDesc></category></category><category xml:id="meter"><catDesc>Metrical Categories</catDesc><category xml:id="feet"><catDesc>Metrical Feet</catDesc><category xml:id="iambic"><catDesc>Iambic</catDesc></category><category xml:id="trochaic"><catDesc>trochaic</catDesc></category></category><category xml:id="feetNumber"><catDesc>Number of feet</catDesc><category xml:id="pentameter"><catDesc>&gt;Pentameter</catDesc></category><category xml:id="tetrameter"><catDesc>&gt;Tetrameter</catDesc></category></category></category></taxonomy><!-- elsewhere in document --><lg xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude" ana="#shakesSonnet #iambic #pentameter"><l>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day</l><!-- ... --></lg>
<TEI>
<TEI> (TEI document) contains a single TEI-conformant document, combining a single TEI header with one or more members of the model.resourceLike class. Multiple <TEI> elements may be combined to form a <teiCorpus> element.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@versionspecifies the version number of the TEI Guidelines against which this document is valid.
Note

Major editions of the Guidelines have long been informally referred to by a name made up of the letter P (for Proposal) followed by a digit. The current release is one of the many releases of the fifth major edition of the Guidelines, known as P5. This attribute may be used to associate a TEI document with a specific release of the P5 Guidelines, in the absence of a more precise association provided by the @source attribute on the associated <schemaSpec>.

Note

This element is required. It is customary to specify the TEI namespace http://www.tei-c.org/ns/1.0 on it, using the @xmlns attribute.

Example
<TEI><teiHeader/><text><body><div/><div/><div/><!--there may be any number of <gi>div</gi>s bar zero; there may be <gi>div</gi>s within <gi>div</gi>s if necessary--></body></text></TEI>
<teiCorpus>
<teiCorpus> contains the whole of a TEI encoded corpus, comprising a single corpus header and one or more <TEI> elements, each containing a single text header and a text.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.typed (@type, @subtype)
@versionspecifies the version number of the TEI Guidelines against which this document is valid.
Note

Major editions of the Guidelines have long been informally referred to by a name made up of the letter P (for Proposal) followed by a digit. The current release is one of the many releases of the fifth major edition of the Guidelines, known as P5. This attribute may be used to associate a TEI document with a specific release of the P5 Guidelines, in the absence of a more precise association provided by the @source attribute on the associated <schemaSpec>.

Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<teiCorpus version="3.3.0"><teiHeader><!-- header for corpus --></teiHeader><TEI><teiHeader><!-- header for first text --></teiHeader><text><!-- content of first text --></text></TEI><TEI><teiHeader><!-- header for second text --></teiHeader><text><!-- content of second text --></text></TEI><!-- more TEI elements here --></teiCorpus>
<teiHeader>
<teiHeader> (TEI header) supplies descriptive and declarative metadata associated with a digital resource or set of resources.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<teiHeader xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><fileDesc><titleStmt><title>Shakespeare: the first folio (1623) in electronic form</title><author>Shakespeare, William (1564–1616)</author><respStmt><resp>Originally prepared by</resp><name>Trevor Howard-Hill</name></respStmt><respStmt><resp>Revised and edited by</resp><name>Christine Avern-Carr</name></respStmt></titleStmt><publicationStmt><distributor>Oxford Text Archive</distributor><address><addrLine>13 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6NN, UK</addrLine></address><idno type="OTA">119</idno><availability><p>Freely available on a non-commercial basis.</p></availability><date when="1968">1968</date></publicationStmt><sourceDesc><bibl>The first folio of Shakespeare, prepared by Charlton Hinman (The Norton Facsimile, 1968)</bibl></sourceDesc></fileDesc><encodingDesc><projectDesc><p>Originally prepared for use in the production of a series of old-spelling concordances in 1968, this text was extensively checked and revised for use during the editing of the new Oxford Shakespeare (Wells and Taylor, 1989).</p></projectDesc><editorialDecl><correction><p>Turned letters are silently corrected.</p></correction><normalization><p>Original spelling and typography is retained, except that long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.</p></normalization></editorialDecl><refsDecl xml:id="ASLREF"><cRefPattern matchPattern="(\S+) ([^.]+)\.(.*)" replacementPattern="#xpath(//div1[@n='$1']/div2/[@n='$2']//lb[@n='$3'])"><p>A reference is created by assembling the following, in the reverse order as that listed here: <list><item>the <att>n</att> value of the preceding <gi>lb</gi></item><item>a period</item><item>the <att>n</att> value of the ancestor <gi>div2</gi></item><item>a space</item><item>the <att>n</att> value of the parent <gi>div1</gi></item></list></p></cRefPattern></refsDecl></encodingDesc><revisionDesc><list><item><date when="1989-04-12">12 Apr 89</date> Last checked by CAC</item><item><date when="1989-03-01">1 Mar 89</date> LB made new file</item></list></revisionDesc></teiHeader>
<text>
<text> contains a single text of any kind, whether unitary or composite, for example a poem or drama, a collection of essays, a novel, a dictionary, or a corpus sample.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declaring (@decls) att.typed (@type, @subtype) att.written (@hand)
Note

This element should not be used to represent a text which is inserted at an arbitrary point within the structure of another, for example as in an embedded or quoted narrative; the <floatingText> is provided for this purpose.

Example
<text><body><div/><div/><div/><!--there may be any number of <gi>div</gi>s bar zero; there may be <gi>div</gi>s within <gi>div</gi>s if necessary--></body></text>
<textClass>
<textClass> (text classification) groups information which describes the nature or topic of a text in terms of a standard classification scheme, thesaurus, etc.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.declarable (@default)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<taxonomy xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><category xml:id="acprose"><catDesc>Academic prose</catDesc></category><!-- other categories here --></taxonomy><!-- ... --><textClass xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><catRef target="#acprose"/><classCode scheme="http://www.udcc.org">001.9</classCode><keywords scheme="http://authorities.loc.gov"><list><item>End of the world</item><item>History - philosophy</item></list></keywords></textClass>
<textLang>
<textLang> (text language) describes the languages and writing systems identified within the bibliographic work being described, rather than its description.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
@mainLang(main language) supplies a code which identifies the chief language used in the bibliographic work.
@otherLangs(other languages) one or more codes identifying any other languages used in the bibliographic work.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<textLang mainLang="en" otherLangs="la"> Predominantly in English with Latin glosses</textLang>
<title>
<title> contains a title for any kind of work.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.canonical (@key, @ref) att.datable (@calendar, @period) (att.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to)) (att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso)) (att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)) att.typed (type, @subtype)
@typeclassifies the title according to some convenient typology.
Sample values include:
  • main
  • sub
  • alt
  • short
  • desc
Note

This attribute is provided for convenience in analysing titles and processing them according to their type; where such specialized processing is not necessary, there is no need for such analysis, and the entire title, including subtitles and any parallel titles, may be enclosed within a single <title> element.

@levelindicates the bibliographic level for a title, that is, whether it identifies an article, book, journal, series, or unpublished material.
Legal values are:
  • a
  • m
  • j
  • s
  • u
Note

The level of a title is sometimes implied by its context: for example, a title appearing directly within an <analytic> element is ipso facto of level a, and one appearing within a <series> element of level s. For this reason, the @level attribute is not required in contexts where its value can be unambiguously inferred. Where it is supplied in such contexts, its value should not contradict the value implied by its parent element.

Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<title>Information Technology and the Research Process: Proceedings of a conference held at Cranfield Institute of Technology, UK, 18–21 July 1989</title>
Example
<title>Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles: a machine readable edition</title>
Example
<title type="full"><title type="main">Synthèse</title><title type="sub">an international journal for epistemology, methodology and history of science</title></title>
<titleStmt>
<titleStmt> (title statement) groups information about the title of a work and those responsible for its content.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source))
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<titleStmt xmlns:xi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XInclude"><title>Capgrave's Life of St. John Norbert: a machine-readable transcription</title><respStmt><resp>compiled by</resp><name>P.J. Lucas</name></respStmt></titleStmt>
<unclear>
<unclear> contains an uncertain or conjectural reading.
Attributesatt.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (sameAs, exclude, @corresp, @synch, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @select) att.global.responsibility (cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source) att.editLike (evidence, @instant)
@cert(certainty) indicates the degree of certainty about the proposed reading. Values are “high”, “medium” or “low”.
Legal values are:
  • high
  • medium
  • low
@reasonindicates why the text is unclear. Permitted values: as for <gap>, except that if the text is difficult (rather than impossible) to read because it is deleted, the @reason value should be “del” rather than “illgblDel”.
Legal values are:
  • blot
  • blotDel
  • copy
  • damage
  • del
  • editorialDecision
  • faded
  • faint
  • foxed
  • hand
  • illgbl
  • over
  • smudge
<div><head>Rx</head><p>500 mg <unclear reason="illegible">placebo</unclear></p></div>
Note

One or more words may be used to describe the reason; usually each word will refer to a single cause.

@agentWhere the difficulty in transcription arises from damage, categorizes the cause of the damage, if it can be identified.
Sample values include:
  • rubbing
  • mildew
  • smoke
Note

If you can think of two or more plausible readings, nest <unclear> elements in a <choice> element, using the @cert values to indicate which (if either/any) you think most convincing (see above under <choice> for examples).

Example
<u>...and then <unclear reason="background-noise">Nathalie</unclear> said ...</u>
<undo>
<undo> indicates one or more marked-up interventions in a document which have subsequently been marked for cancellation.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.spanning (@spanTo) att.transcriptional (@status, @cause, @seq) (att.editLike (@evidence, @instant)) (att.written (@hand)) att.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence))
@targetpoints to one or more elements representing the interventions which are to be reverted or undone.
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<line>This is <del change="#s2" rend="overstrike"><seg xml:id="undo-a">just some</seg> sample <seg xml:id="undo-b">text</seg>, we need</del><add change="#s2">not</add> a real example.</line><undo target="#undo-a #undo-b" rend="dotted" change="#s3"/>
This encoding represents the following sequence of events:
  • "This is just some sample text, we need a real example" is written
  • At stage s2, "just some sample text, we need" is deleted by overstriking, and "not" is added
  • At stage s3, parts of the deletion are cancelled by underdotting, thus reinstating the words "just some" and "text".
<wit>
<wit> contains a list of one or more sigla of witnesses attesting a given reading, in a textual variation.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.rdgPart (@wit)
Note

This element represents the same information as that provided by the @wit attribute of the reading; it may be used to record the exact form of the sigla given in the source edition, when that is of interest.

Example
<rdg wit="#El #Hg">Experience</rdg><wit>Ellesmere, Hengwryt</wit>
<witness>
<witness> contains either a description of a single witness referred to within the critical apparatus, or a list of witnesses which is to be referred to by a single sigil.
Attributesatt.global (@xml:id, @n, @xml:lang, @xml:base, @xml:space) (att.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition)) (att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select)) (att.global.facs (@facs)) (att.global.change (@change)) (att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp)) (att.global.source (@source)) att.sortable (@sortKey)
Note

NB: This element should not be used without first consulting a Senior Editor.

Example
<listWit><witness xml:id="EL">Ellesmere, Huntingdon Library 26.C.9</witness><witness xml:id="HG">Hengwrt, National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, Peniarth 392D</witness><witness xml:id="RA2">Bodleian Library Rawlinson Poetic 149 (see further <ptr target="http://www.examples.com/MSdescs#MSRP149"/>)</witness></listWit>

Model classes

model.availabilityPart
model.availabilityPart groups elements such as licences and paragraphs of text which may appear as part of an availability statement
Used by<availability>
Members<licence>
model.biblLike
model.biblLike groups elements containing a bibliographic description.
Used by<event> <listBibl> model.inter model.msItemPart model.personPart <org> <place> <relatedItem> <sourceDesc> <taxonomy>
Members<bibl> <biblStruct> <listBibl> <msDesc>
model.biblPart
model.choicePart
model.choicePart groups elements (other than <choice> itself) which can be used within a <choice> alternation.
Used by<choice>
Members<abbr> <am> <corr> <ex> <expan> <orig> <reg> <seg> <sic> <supplied> <unclear>
model.common
model.common groups common chunk- and inter-level elements.
Used by<body> <div> <figure> <postscript>
Membersmodel.divPart [model.lLike [<l>] model.pLike [<ab> <p>] <lg>] model.inter [model.biblLike [<bibl> <biblStruct> <listBibl> <msDesc>] model.egLike model.labelLike [<desc> <label>] model.listLike [<list> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <listRelation> <listWit> <table>] model.oddDecl model.qLike [model.quoteLike [<quote>]] model.stageLike]
Note

This class defines the set of chunk- and inter-level elements; it is used in many content models, including those for textual divisions.

model.correspActionPart
model.correspContextPart
model.correspContextPart groups elements which may appear as part of the correspContext element
Used by<correspContext>
Membersmodel.pLike [<ab> <p>] model.ptrLike [<ptr> <ref>] <note>
model.correspDescPart
model.correspDescPart groups together metadata elements for describing correspondence
Used by<correspDesc>
Members<correspAction> <correspContext> <note>
model.dateLike
model.dateLike groups elements containing temporal expressions.
Used by<imprint> model.correspActionPart model.pPart.data
Members<date>
model.descLike
model.descLike groups elements which contain a description of their function.
Used by<category> <gap> <graphic> <space> <taxonomy>
Members<desc>
model.divBottom
model.divBottom groups elements appearing at the end of a text division.
Used by<body> <div> <figure> <front> <lg> <list> <table>
Membersmodel.divBottomPart [<closer> <postscript> <signed>] model.divWrapper [<salute>]
model.divBottomPart
model.divBottomPart groups elements which can occur only at the end of a text division.
Used by<back> model.divBottom <postscript>
Members<closer> <postscript> <signed>
model.divLike
model.divLike groups elements used to represent un-numbered generic structural divisions.
Used by<back> <body> <div> <front> <rdg>
Members<div>
model.divPart
model.divPart groups paragraph-level elements appearing directly within divisions.
Used bymacro.specialPara model.common <rdg>
Membersmodel.lLike [<l>] model.pLike [<ab> <p>] <lg>
Note

Note that this element class does not include members of the model.inter class, which can appear either within or between paragraph-level items.

model.divTop
model.divTop groups elements appearing at the beginning of a text division.
Used by<body> <div> <lg> <list>
Membersmodel.divTopPart [model.headLike [<head>] <opener> <signed>] model.divWrapper [<salute>]
model.divTopPart
model.divTopPart groups elements which can occur only at the beginning of a text division.
Used bymodel.divTop <postscript>
Membersmodel.headLike [<head>] <opener> <signed>
model.divWrapper
model.divWrapper groups elements which can appear at either top or bottom of a textual division.
Used bymodel.divBottom model.divTop
Members<salute>
model.editorialDeclPart
model.editorialDeclPart groups elements which may be used inside <editorialDecl> and appear multiple times.
Used by<editorialDecl>
Members<normalization>
model.emphLike
model.emphLike groups phrase-level elements which are typographically distinct and to which a specific function can be attributed.
Used bymodel.highlighted model.limitedPhrase
Members<foreign> <title>
model.encodingDescPart
model.encodingDescPart groups elements which may be used inside <encodingDesc> and appear multiple times.
Used by<encodingDesc>
Members<classDecl> <editorialDecl>
model.eventLike
model.eventLike groups elements which describe events.
Used by<listEvent> model.orgPart model.personPart <place>
Members<event> <listEvent>
model.frontPart
model.frontPart groups elements which appear at the level of divisions within front or back matter.
Used by<back> <front>
Membersmodel.frontPart.drama <listBibl>
model.global.edit
model.global.edit groups globally available elements which perform a specifically editorial function.
Used bymodel.global
Members<addSpan> <app> <damageSpan> <delSpan> <gap> <space>
model.global.meta
model.global.meta groups globally available elements which describe the status of other elements.
Used bymodel.global
Members<link> <linkGrp>
Note

Elements in this class are typically used to hold groups of links or of abstract interpretations, or by provide indications of certainty etc. It may find be convenient to localize all metadata elements, for example to contain them within the same divison as the elements that they relate to; or to locate them all to a division of their own. They may however appear at any point in a TEI text.

model.graphicLike
model.graphicLike groups elements containing images, formulae, and similar objects.
Used by<facsimile> <figure> model.phrase <surface> <table>
Members<formula> <graphic>
model.headLike
model.headLike groups elements used to provide a title or heading at the start of a text division.
Used by<event> <figure> <listBibl> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <listRelation> <listWit> model.divTopPart <msDesc> <msFrag> <msPart> <org> <place> <table>
Members<head>
model.highlighted
model.highlighted groups phrase-level elements which are typographically distinct.
Used by<bibl> model.phrase
Membersmodel.emphLike [<foreign> <title>] model.hiLike [<hi>]
model.hiLike
model.hiLike groups phrase-level elements which are typographically distinct but to which no specific function can be attributed.
Used bymodel.highlighted model.limitedPhrase
Members<hi>
model.imprintPart
model.imprintPart groups the bibliographic elements which occur inside imprints.
Used by<imprint> model.biblPart
Members<biblScope> <pubPlace> <publisher>
model.labelLike
model.labelLike groups elements used to gloss or explain other parts of a document.
Used by<event> <lg> model.inter <org> <place> <surface>
Members<desc> <label>
model.listLike
model.lLike
model.lLike groups elements representing metrical components such as verse lines.
Used by<head> <lg> macro.paraContent model.divPart
Members<l>
model.measureLike
model.measureLike groups elements which denote a number, a quantity, a measurement, or similar piece of text that conveys some numerical meaning.
Used bymodel.pPart.data
Members<measure> <num>
model.milestoneLike
model.milestoneLike groups milestone-style elements used to represent reference systems.
Used by<listBibl> model.global <org> <subst>
Members<anchor> <cb> <fw> <lb> <pb>
model.msItemPart
model.msQuoteLike
model.msQuoteLike groups elements which represent passages such as titles quoted from a manuscript as a part of its description.
Used bymodel.msItemPart
Members<title>
model.nameLike
model.nameLike groups elements which name or refer to a person, place, or organization.
Used bymodel.correspActionPart model.pPart.data <org>
Membersmodel.nameLike.agent [<name> <orgName> <persName>] model.offsetLike model.persNamePart [<addName> <forename> <genName> <nameLink> <roleName> <surname>] model.placeStateLike [model.placeNamePart [<country> <placeName> <region> <settlement>]] <idno> <rs>
Note

A superset of the naming elements that may appear in datelines, addresses, statements of responsibility, etc.

model.nameLike.agent
model.nameLike.agent groups elements which contain names of individuals or corporate bodies.
Used bymodel.nameLike <respStmt>
Members<name> <orgName> <persName>
Note

This class is used in the content model of elements which reference names of people or organizations.

model.noteLike
model.noteLike groups globally-available note-like elements.
Used by<adminInfo> <app> <biblStruct> <event> model.global <monogr> <msItemStruct> <notesStmt> <org> <place>
Members<note>
model.orgPart
model.orgPart groups elements which form part of the description of an organization.
Used by<org>
Membersmodel.eventLike [<event> <listEvent>] <listPerson> <listPlace>
model.persNamePart
model.persNamePart groups elements which form part of a personal name.
Used bymodel.nameLike
Members<addName> <forename> <genName> <nameLink> <roleName> <surname>
model.personLike
model.personLike groups elements which provide information about people and their relationships.
Used by<listPerson> <org> <particDesc>
Members<org> <person> <personGrp>
model.personPart
model.persStateLike
model.persStateLike groups elements describing changeable characteristics of a person which have a definite duration, for example occupation, residence, or name.
Used bymodel.personPart
Members<age> <occupation> <persName> <residence> <sex>
Note

These characteristics of an individual are typically a consequence of their own action or that of others.

model.physDescPart
model.physDescPart groups specialized elements forming part of the physical description of a manuscript or similar written source.
Used by<physDesc>
Members<objectDesc>
model.placeLike
model.placeLike groups elements used to provide information about places and their relationships.
Used by<listPlace> <org> <place> <settingDesc>
Members<place>
model.placeNamePart
model.placeNamePart groups elements which form part of a place name.
Used bymodel.placeStateLike <msIdentifier>
Members<country> <placeName> <region> <settlement>
model.placeStateLike
model.placeStateLike groups elements which describe changing states of a place.
Used bymodel.nameLike <place>
Membersmodel.placeNamePart [<country> <placeName> <region> <settlement>]
model.pLike.front
model.pLike.front groups paragraph-like elements which can occur as direct constituents of front matter.
Used by<back> <front>
Members<head>
model.pPart.edit
model.pPart.edit groups phrase-level elements for simple editorial correction and transcription.
Used by<bibl> model.phrase
Membersmodel.pPart.editorial [<abbr> <am> <choice> <ex> <expan> <subst>] model.pPart.transcriptional [<add> <corr> <damage> <del> <handShift> <orig> <redo> <reg> <restore> <retrace> <sic> <supplied> <unclear> <undo>]
model.pPart.editorial
model.pPart.editorial groups phrase-level elements for simple editorial interventions that may be useful both in transcribing and in authoring.
Used bymodel.limitedPhrase model.pPart.edit
Members<abbr> <am> <choice> <ex> <expan> <subst>
model.pPart.msdesc
model.pPart.msdesc groups phrase-level elements used in manuscript description.
Used bymodel.limitedPhrase model.phrase
Members<locus> <origDate> <origPlace>
model.pPart.transcriptional
model.pPart.transcriptional groups phrase-level elements used for editorial transcription of pre-existing source materials.
Used by<am> model.pPart.edit
Members<add> <corr> <damage> <del> <handShift> <orig> <redo> <reg> <restore> <retrace> <sic> <supplied> <unclear> <undo>
model.profileDescPart
model.profileDescPart groups elements which may be used inside <profileDesc> and appear multiple times.
Used by<profileDesc>
Members<abstract> <correspDesc> <creation> <handNotes> <langUsage> <particDesc> <settingDesc> <textClass>
model.ptrLike
model.ptrLike groups elements used for purposes of location and reference.
Used by<analytic> <bibl> <biblStruct> model.correspContextPart model.limitedPhrase model.phrase model.publicationStmtPart.detail <monogr> <relatedItem>
Members<ptr> <ref>
model.publicationStmtPart.agency
model.publicationStmtPart.agency groups the child elements of a <publicationStmt> element of the TEI header that indicate an authorising agent.
Used by<publicationStmt>
Members<authority> <publisher>
Note

The agency child elements, while not required, are required if one of the detail child elements is to be used. It is not valid to have a detail child element without a preceding agency child element.

See also model.publicationStmtPart.detail.

model.publicationStmtPart.detail
model.publicationStmtPart.detail groups the agency-specific child elements of the <publicationStmt> element of the TEI header.
Used by<publicationStmt>
Membersmodel.ptrLike [<ptr> <ref>] <availability> <date> <idno> <pubPlace>
Note

A detail child element may not occur unless an agency child element precedes it.

See also model.publicationStmtPart.agency.

model.qLike
model.qLike groups elements related to highlighting which can appear either within or between chunk-level elements.
Used bymacro.phraseSeq model.inter
Membersmodel.quoteLike [<quote>]
model.quoteLike
model.quoteLike groups elements used to directly contain quotations.
Used bymodel.msItemPart model.qLike
Members<quote>
model.rdgLike
model.rdgLike groups elements which contain a single reading, other than the lemma, within a textual variation.
Used by<app>
Members<rdg>
Note

This class allows for variants of the <rdg> element to be easily created via TEI customizations.

model.rdgPart
model.rdgPart groups elements which mark the beginning or ending of a fragmentary manuscript or other witness.
Used by<rdg>
Members<wit>
Note

These elements may appear anywhere within the elements <lem> and <rdg>, and also within any of their constituent elements.

model.resourceLike
model.resourceLike groups separate elements which constitute the content of a digital resource, as opposed to its metadata.
Used by<TEI> <teiCorpus>
Members<facsimile> <text>
model.respLike
model.respLike groups elements which are used to indicate intellectual or other significant responsibility, for example within a bibliographic element.
Used by<editionStmt> model.biblPart model.msItemPart <titleStmt>
Members<author> <editor> <respStmt> <sponsor>
model.segLike
model.segLike groups elements used for arbitrary segmentation.
Used by<bibl> model.phrase
Members<seg>
Note

The principles on which segmentation is carried out, and any special codes or attribute values used, should be defined explicitly in the <segmentation> element of the <encodingDesc> within the associated TEI header.

model.teiHeaderPart
model.teiHeaderPart groups high level elements which may appear more than once in a TEI header.
Used by<teiHeader>
Members<encodingDesc> <profileDesc>
model.titlepagePart
model.titlepagePart groups elements which can occur as direct constituents of a title page, such as <docTitle>, <docAuthor>, <docImprint>, or <epigraph>.
Used by<msItem>
Members<graphic> <imprimatur>

Attribute classes

att.ascribed
att.ascribed provides attributes for elements representing speech or action that can be ascribed to a specific individual.
Members<change>
AttributesAttributes
@whoindicates the person, or group of people, to whom the element content is ascribed.
In the following example from Hamlet, speeches (<sp>) in the body of the play are linked to <castItem> elements in the <castList> using the @who attribute.
<castItem type="role"><role xml:id="Barnardo">Bernardo</role></castItem><castItem type="role"><role xml:id="Francisco">Francisco</role><roleDesc>a soldier</roleDesc></castItem><!-- ... --><sp who="#Barnardo"><speaker>Bernardo</speaker><l n="1">Who's there?</l></sp><sp who="#Francisco"><speaker>Francisco</speaker><l n="2">Nay, answer me: stand, and unfold yourself.</l></sp>
Note

For transcribed speech, this will typically identify a participant or participant group; in other contexts, it will point to any identified <person> element.

att.breaking
att.breaking provides an attribute to indicate whether or not the element concerned is considered to mark the end of an orthographic token in the same way as whitespace.
Members<cb> <lb> <pb>
AttributesAttributes
@breakindicates whether or not the element bearing this attribute should be considered to mark the end of an orthographic token in the same way as whitespace.
Sample values include
  • yes
  • no
  • maybe
In the following lines from the Dream of the Rood, linebreaks occur in the middle of the words lāðost and reord-berendum.
<ab>...eƿesa tome iu icƿæs ȝeƿorden ƿita heardoſt . leodum la<lb break="no"/> ðost ærþan ichim lifes ƿeȝ rihtne ȝerymde reord be<lb break="no"/> rendum hƿæt me þaȝeƿeorðode ƿuldres ealdor ofer...</ab>
att.canonical
att.canonical provides attributes which can be used to associate a representation such as a name or title with canonical information about the object being named or referenced.
Membersatt.naming [att.personal [<addName> <forename> <genName> <name> <orgName> <persName> <placeName> <roleName> <surname>] <author> <birth> <collection> <country> <death> <editor> <event> <institution> <occupation> <origPlace> <pubPlace> <region> <repository> <residence> <rs> <settlement>] <authority> <correspDesc> <date> <publisher> <relation> <resp> <respStmt> <sponsor> <title>
AttributesAttributes
@keyprovides an externally-defined means of identifying the entity (or entities) being named, using a coded value of some kind.
<author><name key="name 427308" type="organisation">[New Zealand Parliament, Legislative Council]</name></author>
<author><name key="Hugo, Victor (1802-1885)" ref="http://www.idref.fr/026927608">Victor Hugo</name></author>
Note

The value may be a unique identifier from a database, or any other externally-defined string identifying the referent.

No particular syntax is proposed for the values of the @key attribute, since its form will depend entirely on practice within a given project. For the same reason, this attribute is not recommended in data interchange, since there is no way of ensuring that the values used by one project are distinct from those used by another. In such a situation, a preferable approach for magic tokens which follows standard practice on the Web is to use a @ref attribute whose value is a tag URI as defined in RFC 4151.

@ref(reference) provides an explicit means of locating a full definition or identity for the entity being named by means of one or more URIs.
<name ref="http://viaf.org/viaf/109557338" type="person">Seamus Heaney</name>
Note

The value must point directly to one or more XML elements or other resources by means of one or more URIs, separated by whitespace. If more than one is supplied the implication is that the name identifies several distinct entities.

att.citing
att.citing provides attributes for specifying the specific part of a bibliographic item being cited.
Members<biblScope>
AttributesAttributes
@unitidentifies the unit of information conveyed by the element, e.g. columns, pages, volume, entry.
Suggested values include:
  • volume
  • issue
  • page
  • line
  • chapter
  • part
  • column
  • entry
@fromspecifies the starting point of the range of units indicated by the @unit attribute.
@tospecifies the end-point of the range of units indicated by the @unit attribute.
att.coordinated
att.coordinated provides attributes which can be used to position their parent element within a two dimensional coordinate system.
Members<surface>
AttributesAttributes
@startindicates the element within a transcription of the text containing at least the start of the writing represented by this zone or surface.
@ulxgives the x coordinate value for the upper left corner of a rectangular space.
@ulygives the y coordinate value for the upper left corner of a rectangular space.
@lrxgives the x coordinate value for the lower right corner of a rectangular space.
@lrygives the y coordinate value for the lower right corner of a rectangular space.
@pointsidentifies a two dimensional area within the bounding box specified by the other attributes by means of a series of pairs of numbers, each of which gives the x,y coordinates of a point on a line enclosing the area.
att.cReferencing
att.cReferencing provides an attribute which may be used to supply a canonical reference as a means of identifying the target of a pointer.
Members<ptr> <ref>
AttributesAttributes
@cRef(canonical reference) specifies the destination of the pointer by supplying a canonical reference expressed using the scheme defined in a <refsDecl> element in the TEI header
Note

The value of @cRef should be constructed so that when the algorithm for the resolution of canonical references (described in section ) is applied to it the result is a valid URI reference to the intended target.

The <refsDecl> to use may be indicated with the @decls attribute.

Currently these Guidelines only provide for a single canonical reference to be encoded on any given <ptr> element.

att.damaged
att.damaged provides attributes describing the nature of any physical damage affecting a reading.
Members<damage> <damageSpan>
Attributesatt.dimensions (@unit, @quantity, @extent, @precision, @scope) (att.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)) att.written (@hand)
@agentcategorizes the cause of the damage, if it can be identified.
Sample values include:
  • rubbing
  • mildew
  • smoke
@degreeprovides a coded representation of the degree of damage, either as a number between 0 (undamaged) and 1 (very extensively damaged), or as one of the codes high, medium, low, or unknown. The <damage> element with the @degree attribute should only be used where the text may be read with some confidence; text supplied from other sources should be tagged as <supplied>.
Note

The <damage> element is appropriate where it is desired to record the fact of damage although this has not affected the readability of the text, for example a weathered inscription. Where the damage has rendered the text more or less illegible either the <unclear> tag (for partial illegibility) or the <gap> tag (for complete illegibility, with no text supplied) should be used, with the information concerning the damage given in the attribute values of these tags. See section for discussion of the use of these tags in particular circumstances.

@groupassigns an arbitrary number to each stretch of damage regarded as forming part of the same physical phenomenon.
att.datable
att.datable provides attributes for normalization of elements that contain dates, times, or datable events.
Members<age> <birth> <change> <country> <creation> <date> <death> <event> <idno> <licence> <name> <occupation> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <persName> <placeName> <provenance> <region> <relation> <residence> <resp> <settlement> <sex> <title>
Attributesatt.datable.w3c (@when, @notBefore, @notAfter, @from, @to) att.datable.iso (@when-iso, @notBefore-iso, @notAfter-iso, @from-iso, @to-iso) att.datable.custom (@when-custom, @notBefore-custom, @notAfter-custom, @from-custom, @to-custom, @datingPoint, @datingMethod)
@calendarindicates the system or calendar to which the date represented by the content of this element belongs.
He was born on <date xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" calendar="#gregorian">Feb. 22, 1732</date> (<date xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" calendar="#julian" when="1732-02-22"> Feb. 11, 1731/32, O.S.</date>).
Note

Note that the @calendar attribute (unlike @datingMethod defined in att.datable.custom) defines the calendar system of the date in the original material defined by the parent element, not the calendar to which the date is normalized.

@periodsupplies a pointer to some location defining a named period of time within which the datable item is understood to have occurred.
Note

This superclass provides attributes that can be used to provide normalized values of temporal information. By default, the attributes from the att.datable.w3c class are provided. If the module for names & dates is loaded, this class also provides attributes from the att.datable.iso and att.datable.custom classes. In general, the possible values of attributes restricted to the W3C datatypes form a subset of those values available via the ISO 8601 standard. However, the greater expressiveness of the ISO datatypes may not be needed, and there exists much greater software support for the W3C datatypes.

att.datable.custom
att.datable.custom provides attributes for normalization of elements that contain datable events to a custom dating system (i.e. other than the Gregorian used by W3 and ISO).
Membersatt.datable [<age> <birth> <change> <country> <creation> <date> <death> <event> <idno> <licence> <name> <occupation> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <persName> <placeName> <provenance> <region> <relation> <residence> <resp> <settlement> <sex> <title>]
AttributesAttributes
@when-customsupplies the value of a date or time in some custom standard form.
The following are examples of custom date or time formats that are not valid ISO or W3C format normalizations, normalized to a different dating system
<p>Alhazen died in Cairo on the <date when="1040-03-06" when-custom="431-06-12"> 12th day of Jumada t-Tania, 430 AH</date>.</p><p>The current world will end at the <date when="2012-12-21" when-custom="13.0.0.0.0">end of B'ak'tun 13</date>.</p><p>The Battle of Meggidu (<date when-custom="Thutmose_III:23">23rd year of reign of Thutmose III</date>).</p><p>Esidorus bixit in pace annos LXX plus minus sub <date when-custom="Ind:4-10-11">die XI mensis Octobris indictione IIII</date></p>
Not all custom date formulations will have Gregorian equivalents.The @when-custom attribute and other custom dating are not constrained to a datatype by the TEI, but individual projects are recommended to regularize and document their dating formats.
@notBefore-customspecifies the earliest possible date for the event in some custom standard form.
@notAfter-customspecifies the latest possible date for the event in some custom standard form.
@from-customindicates the starting point of the period in some custom standard form.
<event xml:id="FIRE1" datingMethod="#julian" from-custom="1666-09-02" to-custom="1666-09-05"><head>The Great Fire of London</head><p>The Great Fire of London burned through a large part of the city of London.</p></event>
@to-customindicates the ending point of the period in some custom standard form.
@datingPointsupplies a pointer to some location defining a named point in time with reference to which the datable item is understood to have occurred
@datingMethodsupplies a pointer to a <calendar> element or other means of interpreting the values of the custom dating attributes.
Contayning the Originall, Antiquity, Increaſe, Moderne eſtate, and deſcription of that Citie, written in the yeare <date when-custom="1598" calendar="#julian" datingMethod="#julian">1598</date>. by Iohn Stow Citizen of London.
In this example, the @calendar attribute points to a <calendar> element for the Julian calendar, specifying that the text content of the <date> element is a Julian date, and the @datingMethod attribute also points to the Julian calendar to indicate that the content of the @when-custom attribute value is Julian too.
<date when="1382-06-28" when-custom="6890-06-20" datingMethod="#creationOfWorld"> μηνὶ Ἰουνίου εἰς <num>κ</num> ἔτους <num>ςωϞ</num></date>
In this example, a date is given in a Mediaeval text measured "from the creation of the world", which is normalised (in @when) to the Gregorian date, but is also normalized (in @when-custom) to a machine-actionable, numeric version of the date from the Creation.
Note

Note that the @datingMethod attribute (unlike @calendar defined in att.datable) defines the calendar or dating system to which the date described by the parent element is normalized (i.e. in the @when-custom or other @X-custom attributes), not the calendar of the original date in the element.

att.datable.iso
att.datable.iso provides attributes for normalization of elements that contain datable events using the ISO 8601 standard.
Membersatt.datable [<age> <birth> <change> <country> <creation> <date> <death> <event> <idno> <licence> <name> <occupation> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <persName> <placeName> <provenance> <region> <relation> <residence> <resp> <settlement> <sex> <title>]
AttributesAttributes
@when-isosupplies the value of a date or time in a standard form.
The following are examples of ISO date, time, and date & time formats that are not valid W3C format normalizations.
<date when-iso="1996-09-24T07:25+00">Sept. 24th, 1996 at 3:25 in the morning</date><date when-iso="1996-09-24T03:25-04">Sept. 24th, 1996 at 3:25 in the morning</date><time when-iso="1999-01-04T20:42-05">4 Jan 1999 at 8:42 pm</time><time when-iso="1999-W01-1T20,70-05">4 Jan 1999 at 8:42 pm</time><date when-iso="2006-05-18T10:03">a few minutes after ten in the morning on Thu 18 May</date><time when-iso="03:00">3 A.M.</time><time when-iso="14">around two</time><time when-iso="15,5">half past three</time>
All of the examples of the @when attribute in the att.datable.w3c class are also valid with respect to this attribute.
He likes to be punctual. I said <q><time when-iso="12">around noon</time></q>, and he showed up at <time when-iso="12:00:00">12 O'clock</time> on the dot.
The second occurence of <time> could have been encoded with the @when attribute, as 12:00:00 is a valid time with respect to the W3C XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes Second Edition specification. The first occurence could not.
@notBefore-isospecifies the earliest possible date for the event in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
@notAfter-isospecifies the latest possible date for the event in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
@from-isoindicates the starting point of the period in standard form.
@to-isoindicates the ending point of the period in standard form.
Note

The value of these attributes should be a normalized representation of the date, time, or combined date & time intended, in any of the standard formats specified by ISO 8601, using the Gregorian calendar.

Note

If both @when-iso and @dur-iso are specified, the values should be interpreted as indicating a span of time by its starting time (or date) and duration. That is, <date when-iso="2007-06-01" dur-iso="P8D"/> indicates the same time period as <date when-iso="2007-06-01/P8D"/>

In providing a regularized form, no claim is made that the form in the source text is incorrect; the regularized form is simply that chosen as the main form for purposes of unifying variant forms under a single heading.

att.datable.w3c
att.datable.w3c provides attributes for normalization of elements that contain datable events conforming to the W3C XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes Second Edition.
Membersatt.datable [<age> <birth> <change> <country> <creation> <date> <death> <event> <idno> <licence> <name> <occupation> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <persName> <placeName> <provenance> <region> <relation> <residence> <resp> <settlement> <sex> <title>]
AttributesAttributes
@whensupplies the value of the date or time in a standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
Examples of W3C date, time, and date & time formats.
<p xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron"><date when="1945-10-24">24 Oct 45</date><date when="1996-09-24T07:25:00Z">September 24th, 1996 at 3:25 in the morning</date><time when="1999-01-04T20:42:00-05:00">Jan 4 1999 at 8 pm</time><time when="14:12:38">fourteen twelve and 38 seconds</time><date when="1962-10">October of 1962</date><date when="--06-12">June 12th</date><date when="---01">the first of the month</date><date when="--08">August</date><date when="2006">MMVI</date><date when="0056">AD 56</date><date when="-0056">56 BC</date></p>
This list begins in the year 1632, more precisely on Trinity Sunday, i.e. the Sunday after Pentecost, in that year the <date xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" calendar="#julian" when="1632-06-06">27th of May (old style)</date>.
<opener xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron"><dateline><placeName>Dorchester, Village,</placeName><date when="1828-03-02">March 2d. 1828.</date></dateline><salute>To Mrs. Cornell,</salute> Sunday <time when="12:00:00">noon.</time></opener>
@notBeforespecifies the earliest possible date for the event in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
@notAfterspecifies the latest possible date for the event in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
@fromindicates the starting point of the period in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
@toindicates the ending point of the period in standard form, e.g. yyyy-mm-dd.
Example
<date xmlns:sch="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron" from="1863-05-28" to="1863-06-01">28 May through 1 June 1863</date>
Note

The value of these attributes should be a normalized representation of the date, time, or combined date & time intended, in any of the standard formats specified by XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes Second Edition, using the Gregorian calendar.

The most commonly-encountered format for the date portion of a temporal attribute is yyyy-mm-dd, but yyyy, --mm, ---dd, yyyy-mm, or --mm-dd may also be used. For the time part, the form hh:mm:ss is used.

Note that this format does not currently permit use of the value 0000 to represent the year 1 BCE; instead the value -0001 should be used.

att.datcat
att.datcat provides the @dcr:datacat and @dcr:ValueDatacat attributes which are used to align XML elements or attributes with the appropriate Data Categories (DCs) defined by the ISO 12620:2009 standard and stored in the Web repository called ISOCat at http://www.isocat.org/.
Membersatt.segLike [<seg>]
AttributesAttributes
@datcatcontains a PID (persistent identifier) that aligns the given element with the appropriate Data Category (or categories) in ISOcat.
@valueDatcatcontains a PID (persistent identifier) that aligns the content of the given element or the value of the given attribute with the appropriate simple Data Category (or categories) in ISOcat.
ExampleIn this example @dcr:datcat relates the feature name to the data category "partOfSpeech" and @dcr:valueDatcat the feature value to the data category "commonNoun". Both these data categories reside in the ISOcat DCR at www.isocat.org, which is the DCR used by ISO TC37 and hosted by its registration authority, the MPI for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen.
<fs xmlns:dcr="http://www.isocat.org/ns/dcr"><f name="POS" dcr:datcat="http://www.isocat.org/datcat/DC-1345" fVal="#commonNoun" dcr:valueDatcat="http://www.isocat.org/datcat/DC-1256"/></fs>
Note

ISO 12620:2009 is a standard describing the data model and procedures for a Data Category Registry (DCR). Data categories are defined as elementary descriptors in a linguistic structure. In the DCR data model each data category gets assigned a unique Peristent IDentifier (PID), i.e., an URI. Linguistic resources or preferably their schemas that make use of data categories from a DCR should refer to them using this PID. For XML-based resources, like TEI documents, ISO 12620:2009 normative Annex A gives a small Data Category Reference XML vocabulary (also available online at http://www.isocat.org/12620/), which provides two attributes, @dcr:datcat and @dcr:valueDatcat.

att.declarable
att.declarable provides attributes for those elements in the TEI header which may be independently selected by means of the special purpose @decls attribute.
Members<availability> <bibl> <biblStruct> <correspDesc> <editorialDecl> <langUsage> <listBibl> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <normalization> <particDesc> <settingDesc> <sourceDesc> <textClass>
AttributesAttributes
@defaultindicates whether or not this element is selected by default when its parent is selected.
Legal values are:
  • true
  • false
Note

The rules governing the association of declarable elements with individual parts of a TEI text are fully defined in chapter . Only one element of a particular type may have a @default attribute with a value of true.

att.declaring
att.declaring provides attributes for elements which may be independently associated with a particular declarable element within the header, thus overriding the inherited default for that element.
Members<back> <body> <facsimile> <front> <graphic> <msDesc> <ptr> <ref> <surface> <text>
AttributesAttributes
@declsidentifies one or more declarable elements within the header, which are understood to apply to the element bearing this attribute and its content.
Note

The rules governing the association of declarable elements with individual parts of a TEI text are fully defined in chapter .

att.dimensions
att.dimensions provides attributes for describing the size of physical objects.
Membersatt.damaged [<damage> <damageSpan>] <age> <birth> <date> <death> <del> <delSpan> <ex> <redo> <restore> <retrace> <subst> <unclear> <undo>
Attributesatt.ranging (@atLeast, @atMost, @min, @max, @confidence)
@unitnames the unit used for the measurement
Suggested values include:
  • cm
  • mm
  • in
  • line
  • char
@quantityspecifies the length in the units specified
@extentindicates the size of the object concerned using a project-specific vocabulary combining quantity and units in a single string of words.
<gap extent="5 words"/>
<height extent="half the page"/>
@precisioncharacterizes the precision of the values specified by the other attributes.
@scopewhere the measurement summarizes more than one observation, specifies the applicability of this measurement.
Sample values include:
  • all
  • most
  • range
att.divLike
att.divLike provides attributes common to all elements which behave in the same way as divisions.
Members<div> <lg>
Attributesatt.fragmentable (@part)
@org(organization) specifies how the content of the division is organized.
Legal values are:
  • composite
  • uniform
@sampleindicates whether this division is a sample of the original source and if so, from which part.
Legal values are:
  • initial
  • medial
  • final
  • unknown
  • complete
att.docStatus
att.docStatus provides attributes for use on metadata elements describing the status of a document.
Members<bibl> <biblStruct> <msDesc> <revisionDesc>
AttributesAttributes
@statusdescribes the status of a document either currently or, when associated with a dated element, at the time indicated.
Sample values include:
  • approved
  • candidate
  • cleared
  • deprecated
  • draft
  • embargoed
  • expired
  • frozen
  • galley
  • proposed
  • published
  • recommendation
  • submitted
  • unfinished
  • withdrawn
Example
<revisionDesc status="published"><change when="2010-10-21" status="published"/><change when="2010-10-02" status="cleared"/><change when="2010-08-02" status="embargoed"/><change when="2010-05-01" status="frozen" who="#MSM"/><change when="2010-03-01" status="draft" who="#LB"/></revisionDesc>
att.edition
att.edition provides attributes identifying the source edition from which some encoded feature derives.
Members<cb> <lb> <pb>
AttributesAttributes
@ed(edition) supplies a sigil or other arbitrary identifier for the source edition in which the associated feature (for example, a page, column, or line break) occurs at this point in the text.
@edRef(edition reference) provides a pointer to the source edition in which the associated feature (for example, a page, column, or line break) occurs at this point in the text.
Example
<l>Of Mans First Disobedience,<lb ed="1674"/> and<lb ed="1667"/> the Fruit</l><l>Of that Forbidden Tree, whose<lb ed="1667 1674"/> mortal tast</l><l>Brought Death into the World,<lb ed="1667"/> and all<lb ed="1674"/> our woe,</l>
Example
<listBibl><bibl xml:id="stapledon1937"><author>Olaf Stapledon</author>, <title>Starmaker</title>, <publisher>Methuen</publisher>, <date>1937</date></bibl><bibl xml:id="stapledon1968"><author>Olaf Stapledon</author>, <title>Starmaker</title>, <publisher>Dover</publisher>, <date>1968</date></bibl></listBibl><!-- ... --><p>Looking into the future aeons from the supreme moment of the cosmos, I saw the populations still with all their strength maintaining the<pb n="411" edRef="#stapledon1968"/>essentials of their ancient culture, still living their personal lives in zest and endless novelty of action, … I saw myself still preserving, though with increasing difficulty, my lucid con-<pb n="291" edRef="#stapledon1937"/>sciousness;</p>
att.editLike
att.editLike provides attributes describing the nature of an encoded scholarly intervention or interpretation of any kind.
Membersatt.transcriptional [<delSpan> <redo> <restore> <retrace> <subst> <undo>] <age> <am> <birth> <date> <death> <event> <ex> <name> <occupation> <org> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <persName> <person> <place> <placeName> <relation> <residence> <sex> <supplied>
AttributesAttributes
@evidenceindicates the nature of the evidence supporting the reliability or accuracy of the intervention or interpretation.
Suggested values include:
  • internal
  • external
  • conjecture
@instantindicates whether this is an instant revision or not.
Defaultfalse
Note

The members of this attribute class are typically used to represent any kind of editorial intervention in a text, for example a correction or interpretation, or to date or localize manuscripts etc.

Note

Each pointer on the @source (if present) corresponding to a witness or witness group should reference a bibliographic citation such as a <witness>, <msDesc>, or <bibl> element, or another external bibliographic citation, documenting the source concerned.

att.fragmentable
att.fragmentable provides an attribute for representing fragmentation of a structural element, typically as a consequence of some overlapping hierarchy.
Membersatt.divLike [<div> <lg>] att.segLike [<seg>] <l> <p>
AttributesAttributes
@partspecifies whether or not its parent element is fragmented in some way, typically by some other overlapping structure: for example a speech which is divided between two or more verse stanzas, a paragraph which is split across a page division, a verse line which is divided between two speakers.
Legal values are:
  • Y
  • N
  • I
  • M
  • F
Note

The values I, M, or F should be used only where it is clear how the element may be reconstituted.

att.global
att.global provides attributes common to all elements in the TEI encoding scheme.
Members<TEI> <abstract> <addName> <additional> <adminInfo> <age> <am> <analytic> <author> <authority> <availability> <back> <bibl> <biblScope> <biblStruct> <birth> <body> <catDesc> <category> <classDecl> <closer> <collection> <condition> <correspAction> <correspContext> <correspDesc> <country> <creation> <custodialHist> <damage> <damageSpan> <date> <death> <delSpan> <desc> <edition> <editionStmt> <editor> <editorialDecl> <encodingDesc> <event> <ex> <extent> <facsimile> <figDesc> <fileDesc> <foliation> <forename> <formula> <front> <genName> <graphic> <handNote> <handNotes> <history> <idno> <imprimatur> <imprint> <institution> <item> <keywords> <label> <langUsage> <licence> <link> <linkGrp> <listBibl> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <listRelation> <listWit> <locus> <measure> <metamark> <monogr> <msContents> <msDesc> <msFrag> <msIdentifier> <msItem> <msItemStruct> <msName> <msPart> <name> <nameLink> <normalization> <notesStmt> <num> <objectDesc> <occupation> <opener> <org> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <particDesc> <persName> <person> <personGrp> <physDesc> <place> <placeName> <postscript> <profileDesc> <provenance> <ptr> <pubPlace> <publicationStmt> <publisher> <quote> <redo> <ref> <region> <relatedItem> <relation> <repository> <residence> <resp> <respStmt> <restore> <retrace> <revisionDesc> <roleName> <rs> <salute> <seg> <settingDesc> <settlement> <sex> <signed> <sourceDesc> <sponsor> <subst> <summary> <support> <supportDesc> <surface> <surname> <surrogates> <taxonomy> <teiCorpus> <teiHeader> <text> <textClass> <textLang> <title> <titleStmt> <undo> <wit> <witness>
Attributesatt.global.rendition (@rend, @style, @rendition) att.global.linking (@corresp, @synch, @sameAs, @copyOf, @next, @prev, @exclude, @select) att.global.facs (@facs) att.global.change (@change) att.global.responsibility (@cert, @resp) att.global.source (@source)
@xml:id(identifier) provides a unique identifier for the element bearing the attribute.
Note

The @xml:id attribute may be used to specify a canonical reference for an element; see section .

@n(number) gives a number (or other label) for an element, which is not necessarily unique within the document.
Note

The value of this attribute is always understood to be a single token, even if it contains space or other punctuation characters, and need not be composed of numbers only. It is typically used to specify the numbering of chapters, sections, list items, etc.; it may also be used in the specification of a standard reference system for the text.

@xml:lang(language) indicates the language of the element content using a tag generated according to BCP 47.
<p>… The consequences of this rapid depopulation were the loss of the last <foreign xml:lang="rap">ariki</foreign> or chief (Routledge 1920:205,210) and their connections to ancestral territorial organization.</p>
Note

The xml:lang value will be inherited from the immediately enclosing element, or from its parent, and so on up the document hierarchy. It is generally good practice to specify xml:lang at the highest appropriate level, noticing that a different default may be needed for the teiHeader from that needed for the associated resource element or elements, and that a single TEI document may contain texts in many languages.

The authoritative list of registered language subtags is maintained by IANA and is available at . For a good general overview of the construction of language tags, see , and for a practical step-by-step guide, see .

The value used must conform with BCP 47. If the value is a private use code (i.e., starts with x- or contains -x-), a <language> element with a matching value for its @ident attribute should be supplied in the TEI header to document this value. Such documentation may also optionally be supplied for non-private-use codes, though these must remain consistent with their IETF definitions.

@xml:baseprovides a base URI reference with which applications can resolve relative URI references into absolute URI references.
<div type="bibl"><head>Bibliography</head><listBibl xml:base="http://www.lib.ucdavis.edu/BWRP/Works/"><bibl><author><name>Landon, Letitia Elizabeth</name></author><ref target="LandLVowOf.sgm"><title>The Vow of the Peacock</title></ref></bibl><bibl><author><name>Compton, Margaret Clephane</name></author><ref target="NortMIrene.sgm"><title>Irene, a Poem in Six Cantos</title></ref></bibl><bibl><author><name>Taylor, Jane</name></author><ref target="TaylJEssay.sgm"><title>Essays in Rhyme on Morals and Manners</title></ref></bibl></listBibl></div>
@xml:spacesignals an intention about how white space should be managed by applications.
Legal values are:
  • default
  • preserve
Note

The XML specification provides further guidance on the use of this attribute. Note that many parsers may not handle xml:space correctly.

att.global.change
att.global.change supplies the @change attribute, allowing its member elements to specify one or more states or revision campaigns with which they are associated.
Membersatt.global [<TEI> <abstract> <addName> <additional> <adminInfo> <age> <am> <analytic> <author> <authority> <availability> <back> <bibl> <biblScope> <biblStruct> <birth> <body> <catDesc> <category> <classDecl> <closer> <collection> <condition> <correspAction> <correspContext> <correspDesc> <country> <creation> <custodialHist> <damage> <damageSpan> <date> <death> <delSpan> <desc> <edition> <editionStmt> <editor> <editorialDecl> <encodingDesc> <event> <ex> <extent> <facsimile> <figDesc> <fileDesc> <foliation> <forename> <formula> <front> <genName> <graphic> <handNote> <handNotes> <history> <idno> <imprimatur> <imprint> <institution> <item> <keywords> <label> <langUsage> <licence> <link> <linkGrp> <listBibl> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <listRelation> <listWit> <locus> <measure> <metamark> <monogr> <msContents> <msDesc> <msFrag> <msIdentifier> <msItem> <msItemStruct> <msName> <msPart> <name> <nameLink> <normalization> <notesStmt> <num> <objectDesc> <occupation> <opener> <org> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <particDesc> <persName> <person> <personGrp> <physDesc> <place> <placeName> <postscript> <profileDesc> <provenance> <ptr> <pubPlace> <publicationStmt> <publisher> <quote> <redo> <ref> <region> <relatedItem> <relation> <repository> <residence> <resp> <respStmt> <restore> <retrace> <revisionDesc> <roleName> <rs> <salute> <seg> <settingDesc> <settlement> <sex> <signed> <sourceDesc> <sponsor> <subst> <summary> <support> <supportDesc> <surface> <surname> <surrogates> <taxonomy> <teiCorpus> <teiHeader> <text> <textClass> <textLang> <title> <titleStmt> <undo> <wit> <witness>]
AttributesAttributes
@changepoints to one or more <change> elements documenting a state or revision campaign to which the element bearing this attribute and its children have been assigned by the encoder.
att.global.facs
att.global.facs provides an attribute used to express correspondence between an element containing transcribed text and all or part of an image representing that text.
Membersatt.global [<TEI> <abstract> <addName> <additional> <adminInfo> <age> <am> <analytic> <author> <authority> <availability> <back> <bibl> <biblScope> <biblStruct> <birth> <body> <catDesc> <category> <classDecl> <closer> <collection> <condition> <correspAction> <correspContext> <correspDesc> <country> <creation> <custodialHist> <damage> <damageSpan> <date> <death> <delSpan> <desc> <edition> <editionStmt> <editor> <editorialDecl> <encodingDesc> <event> <ex> <extent> <facsimile> <figDesc> <fileDesc> <foliation> <forename> <formula> <front> <genName> <graphic> <handNote> <handNotes> <history> <idno> <imprimatur> <imprint> <institution> <item> <keywords> <label> <langUsage> <licence> <link> <linkGrp> <listBibl> <listEvent> <listPerson> <listPlace> <listRelation> <listWit> <locus> <measure> <metamark> <monogr> <msContents> <msDesc> <msFrag> <msIdentifier> <msItem> <msItemStruct> <msName> <msPart> <name> <nameLink> <normalization> <notesStmt> <num> <objectDesc> <occupation> <opener> <org> <orgName> <origPlace> <origin> <particDesc> <persName> <person> <personGrp> <physDesc> <place> <placeName> <postscript> <profileDesc> <provenance> <ptr> <pubPlace> <publicationStmt> <publisher> <quote> <redo> <ref> <region> <relatedItem> <relation> <repository> <residence> <resp> <respStmt> <restore> <retrace> <revisionDesc> <roleName> <rs> <salute> <seg> <settingDesc> <settlement> <sex> <signed> <sourceDesc> <sponsor> <subst> <summary> <support> <supportDesc> <surface>