Catalogue Entry: OTHE00023

Chapter 6: 'The Long-Lost Truth.'

Author: David Boyd Haycock

Source: William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England (2002).

[Normalized Text] [Diplomatic Text]

[1] Sprat (1667) p. 5. By 'Eastern' he meant the Assyrians, Chaldeans and Egyptians, and this region is still considered by modern archaeologists to be the cradle of Mediterranean and European civilization.

[2] Newton, New College MS 361/2 f. 110; his alternative for the other 'side of the Indies' would be China; Stukeley to Samuel Gale, 25 October 1727, in Stukeley (1980) p. 140.

[3] Greaves (1646) p. 17.

[4] See Iversen (1993), esp. pp. 38-41.

[5] Herodotus, Histories Book II.4 (1996) p. 118.

[6] Speake (1994) p. 506; Iversen (1993) p. 45.

[7] Quoted in Patrides (1969) p. 7.

[8] Quoted in Harrison (1990), p. 13.

[9] Stukeley Bod MS Eng. misc. e. 667/3 f. 43. This account, if it was ever written, has not survived.

[10] See Yates (1964) pp. 398-403.

[11] See Martin Bernal, 'Black Athena is the Ancient Model', Times Literary Supplement, 11 May 2001. The study of Coptic Gnostic texts since the 1970s has shown parrallels between them and the Hermetic corpus, again raising questions of their preceise dating.

[12] Dobbs (1991) p. 54.

[13] Sprat (1667) p. 5.

[14] See Turnbull (1959-1977) vol. 2, p. 331.

[15] see Waller (1705) p. 405, and Sprat (1667) p. 5.

[16] Toland 'Clidophorus' (1720) title page.

[17] DNB.

[18] Clarke (1712) p. viii.

[19] Ibid p. ix.

[20] 'Concerning the service of the church.'

[21] For the only full-length -- though still very brief -- biography of Kircher see Godwin (1979), and also the DSB.

[22] Iversen (1993) p. 94; Godwin (1979) p. 15.

[23] See Godwin (1979) p. 15.

[24] Iversen (1993) p. 94. Iversen writes that in spite of his subsequent reputation, 'From a humanistic as well as an intellectual point of view Egyptology may very well be proud of having Kircher as its founder.'

[25] Popkin (1990b) p. 10.

[26] See Grafton (1992) pp. 210-11, and Rubies (1991).

[27] Grotius (1711) 'Translator's Preface'.

[28] Ibid., Book I, section 16, 'From Foreign Testimonies': p. 25 and p. 44.

[29] See Rosa (1994), de Vet (1984), and Klauber (1991).

[30] Grotius (1711) 'Translator's Preface': the translator is named as John Clarke, presumably an anglicized form of Jean LeClerc.

[31] See Halyburton (1714); Leland (1745); Reventlow (1984) pp. 185-6; see Bedford (1979) for an intellectual biography of Herbert. For a contemporary definitiion of deism, see Clarke (1706), esp. p. 37

[32] Herbert (1705) pp. 1-2.

[33] Ibid. p. 5.

[34] Ibid. p. 6.

[35] Ibid. pp. 3-7.

[36] Ibid. p. 8.

[37] Ibid. p. 13.

[38] Quoted in Klaiber (1976) p. 508.

[39] Romans (1:22-23).

[40] Herbert (1705), p. 3.

[41] Popkin (1990a) p. 32.

[42] See Piggott (1974), pp. 433, 447, 452.

[43] Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. e. 650 f. 9, 'Disquisitio de Deo' (1732).

[44] Stukeley CCCC MS 615.

[45] Stukeley Wellcome MS 4722 f. 2.

[46] Richard Bentley, 'Life and Character of Bishop Stillingfleet', in Stillingfleet's Works (London 1710) I p. 5, quoted in Popkin (1971) p. 306.

[47] Stillingfleet (1709) p. 9.

[48] Ibid. p. 9.

[49] Ibid. pp. 360-1.

[50] Stukeley Cardiff MS 4.253 f. 111.

[51] Wilkins (1675) pp. 39, 61.

[52] Ibid. p. 43

[53] See Rivers (1991), esp. pp. 37-87.

[54] Thomas Burnet, Sermon Preached at the Funeral … of John Tillotson (1694) p. 30, quoted in Rivers (1991) p. 67.

[55] Quoted in Gascoigne (1991) p.182.

[56] Thomas Burnet, Archaeologiae Philosophicae sive Doctrina Antiqua de Rerum Originibus (1692) (English ed. London 1736) pp. 241-6, quoted in Gascoigne (1991) pp. 182-3.

[57] see Gascoigne (1991) pp. 175-8.

[58] DNB; Champion (1992) p. 155.

[59] More An Account of Virtue (1690) p. 267, originally published in Latin as Enchiridion ethicum (1668), translated by Edward Southwell, quoted in Patrides (1969) p.7.

[60] Sailor's assertion is based on his study of Newton's four folio page manuscript in the Clarke Library titled 'Out of Cudworth', Sailor (1988); McKnight (1991) p. 143.

[61] Casini (1984) p. 3.

[62] Manuel (1974) p. 95. Manuel likens Newton's interpretation of prophetic language as symbolical and hieroglyphic to a primary theme of Giambattista Vico's philosophy of history in his Scienza Nuova (1725): 'that the earliest peoples expressed themselves in symbols and poetic speech, not in ordinary prose.' Manuel (1974) pp. 95-6.

[63] See Gascoigne (1991), and Harrison (1990) p. 114.

[64] Gascoigne (1991) p. 185.

[65] Newton (1728).

[66] Newton in the unpublished Irenicum, quoted in McLachlan (1950) p. 28, and Newton in the unpublished manuscript 'A Short Scheme of the True Religion', quoted in McLachlan (1950) p. 52.

[67] Quoted in Gascoigne (1991) p. 190.

[68] Newton Yahuda MS 41 f. 5, quoted in Gascoigne (1991) p. 190.

[69] Popkin (1990b) p. 11.

[70] Trompf (1991) p. 216.

[71] Ibid.

[72] Newton New College MS 361/2 f.108v.

[73] Westfall (1980) pp. 351-2.

[74] Turnbull Vol. 3, p. 338.

[75] Newton New College MS II f. 160.

[76] Quoted in Iliffe (1989) p. 81, parentheses mine.

[77] Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, trans. A.M. Duncan (Newton Abbot 1976) p. 50; Walker (1972) p. 187.

[78] Newton Yahuda MS 41 f. 8r, quoted in Manuel (1974) pp. 44-5. The Prytaneion contained the representative hearth of the city of Athens: see Pausanias (I.18.3).

[79] Yahuda MS 41, ff. 3r--3v.

[80] Ibid. f. 6r.

[81] Gascoigne (1991) pp. 188.

[82] Westfall (1982) p. 26.

[83] See Manuel (1974) p. 43.

[84] See Gascoigne (1991) pp. 188-9, and Westfall (1982) p. 26.

[85] Newton (1721) p. 379.

[86] Newton Yahuda MS 41 f. 5.

[87] Stukeley (1936) p. 70.

[88] In Ezechielem Explanationes et Apparatus Urbis ac Templi Hierosolymitani (Rome 1596-1631). See Bennett and Madelbrote (1998) pp. 135-55.

[89] Lamy, Apparatus Biblicus (London 1723).

[90] Daily Courant Monday 20 June 1726.

[91] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (1) f. 122.

[92] Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 533 f. 41.

[93] Stukeley to John Conduitt, Grantham 26 June--22 July 1727, Keynes MS 136. Stukeley also discussed these matters with the Earl of Pembroke, Martin Folkes '& some more of my friends'. See Stukeley Roy. Soc. MS 142 f. 12

[94] Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 f. 203.

[95] Quoted in Westfall (1980) p. 354.

[96] See Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 ff. 210, 229, 233.

[97] Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 ff. 99-101.

[98] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (5) ff. 4-6.

[99] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (1) f. 122.

[100] Stukeley Roy. Soc. MS 142 f. 13.

[101] Ibid.

[102] Manuel (1974) p. 93.

[103] Newton (1733) chapter 6.

[104] Ibid. pp. 59-60. He cited his sources as Camden and Nennius.

[105] Ibid. pp. 251-2.

[106] Ibid. pp. 252-3.

[107] Ibid.

[108] Ibid. pp. 204-5.

[109] SS 2, p. 262.

[110] SS 1, p. 203.

[111] DNB.

[112] See Smith (1987) p. 124.

[113] Hartley to Stukeley, 5 April 1734, in Nichols (1817) p. 804.

[114] Hartley to Stukeley, 19 December 1735, in ibid. p. 805.

[115] Nichols (1817) p. 805.

[116] Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 f.240.

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