Catalogue Entry: OTHE00018

Chapter 1: 'Standing on the Sholders of Giants.'

Author: David Boyd Haycock

Source: William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England (2002).

[Normalized Text] [Diplomatic Text]

[1] Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 533 f. 9v; this resort to Scripture as a counter-argument is an early indication of his future studies.

[2] Bod. MS Eng. misc. e. 667/1 and Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 533 f. 10r.

[3] Stukeley CCCC MS 623 f. 9.

[4] Vickers (1987) p. 3.

[5] Quoted in ibid. pp. 25-6.

[6] See Boas Hall (1981) and Boas Hall (1991) p. 10.

[7] McClellan (1985) p. 50.

[8] Hunter (1981) pp. 33-6; McClellan (1985) p. 50.

[9] Quoted in Hunter (1981) p. 37.

[10] Hunter (1981) p. 67.

[11] See Hunter (1985).

[12] Hunter (1981) pp. 14-5.

[13] Westfall (1977) pp. 4-5.

[14] Westfall (1980) pp. 6-7.

[15] Stukeley Roy. Soc. MS. 142 ff. 15-6.

[16] Newton to Bentley, quoted in DNB.

[17] Quoted in Casini (1984) p. 16.

[18] 'Mr Leibnitz's First Paper', quoted in Alexander (1956) p. 11.

[19] Edwards (1714) p. 77.

[20] 'S. P.' A Brief Account of the New Sect of Latitude Men (London 1662), quoted in Southgate (1989) p. 253.

[21] Edwards (1714) p. ii.

[22] From The Advancement of Learning, quoted in Quinton (1980) p. 22.

[23] In a letter of 1669 to Oldenberg, quoted in Gascoigne (1984) p. 8.

[24] Brooke (1991) p.160. Latitudinarianism rose to dominance after the Glorious Revolution, largely due to the High Churchmen's commitment to the divine right of kingship and thus their natural opposition to William and Mary's accession after the expulsion of James II; see Olson (1990) p. 118.

[25] Hearne, 24 August 1732, Collections Vol. 11, pp. 100-1.

[26] Swift (1726) p. 70.

[27] Quoted in Shapin (1996) p. 37.

[28] See Brooke (1991) p. 143.

[29] See Raven (1942), esp. p. 149.

[30] Quoted in DNB; Grew was briefly Secretary of the Royal Society following the death of Oldenberg.

[31] Ray (1704) unpaginated preface.

[32] Ibid. p. 61.

[33] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (1) f. 30.

[34] Borlase (1758) p. iv.

[35] Stukeley FM MS 1130 Stu (1) ff. 125-6.

[36] Clarke, A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God: More Particularly in Answer to Mr Hobbs, Spinoza, and their Followers (London, 1705) p. 50.

[37] Hunter (1990) pp. 444, 445.

[38] Hunter (1981) p. 27.

[39] Quoted in Emerson (1987) p. 26, from A Defence of Natural and Revealed Religion Being a Collection of the Sermons (1739) edited by Sampson Letsome and John Nickell.

[40] Newton to Bentley, 10 December 1692, quoted in Hunter (1981) p. 184.

[41] Newton, (1729) Vol. 2, pp. 388-90.

[42] Ibid. Vol. 1, 'Mr Cotes's Preface.'

[43] Newton (1721) pp. 378-9.

[44] These were published in 1713 as Physico-Theology and were still in print in 1768, by which time they had reached a thirteenth edition.

[45] Whiston (1717) p. 242.

[46] Ibid. pp. 45-6; p. 242.

[47] Bentley (1710) 'Publisher's Remarks to the Reader'.

[48] George Hickes (1642-1713) to the lawyer Roger North (1651-1734), quoted in Force (1990) p. 53.

[49] Whiston (1717) p. 242. See Force (1985) p. 66. Whiston's Boyle Lectures delivered in 1707 were published as The Accomplishment of Scripture Prophecy (London 1708), and Force suggests that the topic may well have been suggested by Newton himself. Force (1985) pp. 70-6.

[50] Everard Maynwaring, Tabidorum Narratio: A Treatise of Consumptions (London, 1667) pp. 25, 26.

[51] In Novum Organum (1620), quoted in Spadafora (1990) p. 22.

[52] William Warburton, Works (1788) Vol. 2, p. 689, quoted in Marshall and Williams (1982) pp. 7-8.

[53] Wotton (1694) p. 358.

[54] La Mettrie (1748) p. 160.

[55] Quoted in Conrad et al (1995) p. 331.

[56] McGuire and Rattansi (1966) pp. 126-7.

[57] Quoted in Merton (1985) who shows the long duration and use of the metaphor prior to Newton.

[58] Stukeley Bod. MS Eng. misc. c. 323 f. 7.

[59] Spadafora (1990) offers an extensive study of the idea of 'progress' in eighteenth-century Britain, which he argues 'was so crucial a concept and … so closely interwoven with so many major intellectual trends of the time that we cannot understand eighteenth-century thought without understanding it' (p. xiii).

[60] Stukeley RCP MS 340/14.

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