<1r>

The Answer to some Questions propounded by the Lord Chancellor at the Appearance of the Vice Chancellor & Deputies of the Senate of the Vniversity of Cambridge before the Lords Commissioners May 7th 1687.

To the Question what was the Vice Chancellors Oath of Office. They say that the words of the Oath are these: Iurabis quod bene et fideliter præstabis omnia quæ spectant ad officium Procancellarij hujus Academiæ: Sic te Deus adjuvet &c: which office being stated & prescribed by the Laws of the Land & Statutes of the Vniversity, the Vice Chancellor is thereby obliged to observe faithfully those laws so far as they respect his office: a part of which Statutes were those recited in the beginning of the Answer of the Vice Chancellor & Senate formerly presented to your Lordships. Further the said Oath we conceive to be as ancient as the office of Vicechancellourship, & that the breaches thereof doe not onely make the Vice Chancellor forsworn but also affect the whole Senate.

To the Question: Have you never admitted persons to Degrees without taking the oaths. They answer that they know not of any that have been so admitted, excepting onely such as by the custome of the Vniversity have been reputed Noblemen. As to other persons who take Degrees of Learning to use, exercise, supply or occupy the same (as the statute words it) they represent that it has been the constant custome of the Vniversity to require the Oaths. And for Dr Lightfoot in whom your Lordship instanced they are fully satisfied that he did take the oaths by reason that he subscribed the three Articles in their common Register to which all persons taking the oaths do sett their hands, one of which Articles is the Kings supremacy, & which subscription is all the Record they have & conse{quently} all the proofe that can be expected from them of any mans taking the said oaths, {the} <1v> oaths themselvs being never recorded. And yet in proofe of this matter they further alledge that Dr Lightfoot took his Degree by the benefitt of the same Letters from which the aforesaid Perrera & Stephens were upon their refusing to take the oaths excluded as appears by the records of the Vniversity. And if any one shall represent (as they hear some do) that he took a Degree in his absence from the Vniversity & consequently without taking the said oaths, they answer that he did it by Proxy under hand & seale in which instrument he empowers his Proxy to take the oaths for him & binds himself to abide by those oaths according to the practise of the civil Law. And further if any one hath in any hurry of business or otherwise by oversight escaped taking them, they conceive it was a transgression of the law punishable in the persons offending & can be no just precedent for any to transgress them wilfully & thereby subject themselvs to the penalties {thereof.} And they further say that they are fully & particularly assured, that no person was ever admitted to a Degree who refused to take the oaths.

To the Questions, why the Senate interposed in this affair & sent up Messengers to the Vice Chancellor. They answer that the Kings Mandate being communicated to the Senate according to its directions they conceived themselvs obliged by their oaths so to do, for (beside their oaths of Allegiance & supremacy) all the Members of the Senate have obliged themselvs by their Matriculation Oath to save harmless the State, honour & dignity of the Vniversity as long as they live; & the same to defend by their vote & counsel whether askt or not askt. And further they represent that it is the natural right & priviledge of {al Senates} that their members may consult & advise one another concerning any business which comes before them, & the onely way whereby the houses in Senate or any of their Members may consult the Vice Chancellor is by Messengers, it being indecent for him to go down to them, & turbulent for any great Number of them to go up to him. That it is very frequent for persons to go up from him to the houses to advise or consult him either in their own Names or in the names of many others or in the names of whole Colledges, & by the same reason many or all the Colledges or Senate may consult him by one or more Messengers in any business <2r> which concerns the whole. That his late Majestie in a Letter to the Vniversity dated December 15th 1669 enjoyned that none in the Regent house shall make any other addresse to the Vice Chancellor then by reverent & respectfull application to him: whereby his said Majestie seems both to advise & approve addresses of this nature; we humbly conceiving that the sence of both houses was communicated to the Vice Chancellor by their Messengers in the most modest quiett reverent & respectfull manner that they could think of. And the reason why these Messengers rather then others were chosen by the Senate was because of their being publick persons or Seniors of their houses.

They were influenced also by their religion established & supported by the laws they are commanded to infringe. Men of the Roman ffaith have been put into Masterships of Colleges. The entrance into ffellowships is as open. And if forreigners be once incorporated twill be as open to them as others. A mixture of Papist and Protestants in the same Vniversity can neither subsist happily nor long together. And if the fountains once be dryed up the streams hitherto diffused thence throughout the Nation must soon fall of. Tis not their preferments for a time but their religion & Church which men of Conscience are concerned for, & if it must falll they implore this mercy that it may fall by the hands of others.

<3r>

The Answer to some Questions propounded by the Lord Chancellour at the appearance of the Vice-Chancellor & Deputies of the Senate of the Vniversity of Cambridge before the Lords Commissioners May 7th 1687

To the Question what was the Vice Chancellors oath of office. They say that the words of the oath are these: Iurabis quod bene et fideliter præstabis omnia quæ spectant ad officium Procancellarij hujus Academiæ: Sic te Deus adjuvet &c: which office being stated & prescribed by the Laws of the Land & Statutes of the Vniversity, the Vice Chancellor is thereby obliged to observe faithfully those laws so far as they respect his office: a part of which statutes were those recited in the beginning of the Answer of the Vice Chancellor & Senate formerly presented to their Lordships. Further the said oath they conceive to be as ancient as the office of Vice chancellourship, & that the breaches thereof doe not onely make the Vice Chancellor forsworn but also affect the whole Senate.

To the Question, Did you ever know the Kings Mandate for Degrees declined before They answer always in this case where the oaths have been refused. An instance of this was given in one Tatnel who was a non-conformist and upon certificate from the Vniversity that he refused to take the said oaths his late Majestie was pleased to recall his particular Mandate for conferring the Degree of Dr of Divinity. And they further say that Mr. Pereira & Mr Stephens Servants to her Majesty the Queen Dowager & Roman Catholicks, upon his late Majestys general Mandate for conferring Degrees on occasion of the Kings comming to the Vniversity had their graces passed by the Senate but upon their refusing to take these oaths were not admitted.

To the Question have you never admitted persons to Degrees without taking the oaths: They answer that they know not of any that have been so admitted, excepting onely such as by the Custome of the Vniversity have been reputed Noblemen. As to other persons who take Degrees of Learning to use exercise supply or occupy the same (as the statute words it) they represent that it has been the constant custome of the Vniversity to require the oaths. And for Dr. Lightfoot in whom his Lordship instanced they are fully satisfied that he did take the oaths by reason that he subscribed the three Articles in their common Register to which all persons taking the oaths do sett their hands, one of which Articles is the Kings supremacy, & which subscription is all the Record they have & consequently all the proofe that can be expected from them of any mans taking the said oaths, the oaths themselvs being never recorded. And yet in proofe of this Matter they further alledge that Dr Lightfoot took his Degree by the benefitt of the same Letters from which the aforesaid Pereira & Stephens were upon their refusing to take the oaths excluded <3v> as appears by the Records of the Vniversity. And if any one shall represent (as they hear some do) that he took a Degree in his absence from the Vniversity & consequently without taking the said oaths, they answer that he did it by Proxy under hand & Seale in which instrument he empowers his Proxy to take the oaths for him and binds himself to abide by those oaths, according to the practise of the civil Law. And further if any one hath in any hurry of business or otherwise by oversight escaped taking them, they conceive it was a transgression of the Law punishable in the persons offending & can be no just precedent for any to transgress them wilfully & thereby subject themselvs to the penalties thereof. And they further say that they are fully & particularly assured that no person was ever admitted to a Degree who refused to take the oaths.

To the Question why the Senate interposed in this affair & sent up Messengers to the Vice Chancellor. They answer that the Kings Mandate being communicated to the Senat according to its direction, the accepting the same would have passed for their act: especially since Degrees are not given by the Vice Chancellor without the Senate consisting of a certain number of persons at the least & consenting either by vote or else by silence which in their proceedings usually passeth for an affirmative vote. They conceived themselvs obliged by their oaths so to interpose. For beside their oaths of Allegiance & supremacy whereby they promise to renounce all forreigne Authority & to their power assist and defend all authorities annexed to the Imperial Crowne of England and by consequence to oppose as far as they may lawfully the abettors of forreign authorities) they have obliged themselvs by their Matriculation Oath to preserve the priviledges of the Vniversity as much as in them lies, & to save harmless the State honour & dignity thereof as long as they live & the same to defend by their vote & counsell whether askt or not askt, & other oaths to the same purpose are taken & repeated by every graduate in his respective degree. And even Noblemen themselvs who are excused from all other oaths do make faith to the same purpose in verbo honoris. And further they represent that it is the natural right & priviledge of all Senates that their members may consult & advise one another concerning any business which comes before them, & the onely way whereby the houses in Senate or any of their members may conveniently consult the Vice Chancellor is by Messengers it being indecent for him to go down to them, & turbulent for any great Number of them to go up to him. That it is very frequent for persons to go up to him from the houses to advise or consult him either in their own Names or in the Names of many others or in the Names of whole Colledges, & by <4r> the same reason many or all the Colledges or Senate may consult him by one or more Messengers in any business which concerns the whole. That his late Majestie in a Letter to the Vniversity dated Decemb. 15th 1669 enjoyned that none in the regent house shall make any other address to the Vice Chancellor then by a reverent & respectfull application to him: whereby his said Majestie seems both to advise & to approve addresses of this nature; we humbly conceiving that the sence of both houses was communicated to the Vice Chancellor by their Messengers in the most modest quiet reverent & respectfull manner that they could think of. And the reason why these Messengers rather then others were chosen by the Senate was because of their being publick persons or Seniors of their houses.

<5r>

The Answer to some Questions propounded by the Lord chancellor at the appearance of the Vicechancellor & Deputies of the Senate of the Vniversity of Cambridge before the Lords Commissioners May 7th 1687.

To the Question what was the Vice Chancellors oath of office. They say that the words of the oath are these: Iurabis quod bene et fideliter præstabis omnia quæ spectant ad officium Procancellarij hujus Academiæ: sic te Deus adjuvet &c: which office being stated & prescribed by the Laws of the Land & statutes of the Vniversity, the Vice Chancellor is thereby obliged to observe faithfully those laws so far as they respect his office a part of which statutes were those recited in the beginning of the Answer of the Vice Chancellor & Senate formerly presented to their Lordships. Further the said oath they conceive to be as ancient as the office of Vice Chancellourship {& that} the breaches thereof doe not onely make the Vice Chancellor forsworn but also affect {the} whole Senate.

To the Question, Did you ever know the Kings Mandate for Degrees declined before. They answer always in this Case where the oaths have been refused. An instance of this was given in one Tatnel who was a Non-conformist and upon certificate from the Vniversity that he refused to take the said oaths his late Majestie was pleased to recall his particular Mandate for conferring the Degree of Dr of Divinity. And they further say that Mr. Pereira & Mr Stephens Servants to her Majesty the Queen Dowager & Roman Catholicks, upon his late Majestys general Mandate for conferring Degrees on occasion of the Kings coming to the Vniversity had their graces passed by the Senate but upon their refusing to take these Oaths were not admitted.

To the Question have you never admitted persons to Degrees without taking the Oaths. They answer that they know not of any that have been so admitted, excepting onely such as by the Custome of the Vniversity have been reputed Noblemen. As to other persons who take Degrees of Learning to use exercise supply or occupy the same (as the Statute words it) they represent that it has been the constant Custome of the Vniversity to require the Oaths. And for Dr. Lightfoot in whom his Lordship instanced they are fully satisfied that he did take the oaths by reason that he subscribed the three Articles in their common Register to which all persons taking the oaths do sett their hands, one of which Articles is the Kings Supremacy, & which subscription is all the Record <5v> they have, & consequently all the proofe that can be expected from them of any mans taking the said oaths, the oaths themselvs being never recorded. And yet in proof of this Matter they further alledge that Dr. Lightfoot took his Degree by the benefitt of the same Letters from which the aforesaid Pereira & Stephens were upon their refusing to take the oaths excluded as appears by the records of the Vniversity. And if any one shall represent (as they hear some do) that he took a Degree in his absence from the Vniversity & consequently without taking the said oaths, they answer that he did it by Proxy under hand & Seal, in which instrument he empowers his Proxy to take the oaths for him and binds himself to abide by those oaths, according to the practise of the civil Law. And further if any one hath in any hurry of business or otherwise by oversight escaped taking them, they conceive it was a transgression of the Law punishable in the persons offending, & can be no just precedent for any to transgress them wilfully & thereby subject themselvs to the penalties thereof. And they further say that they are fully & particularly assured that no person was ever admitted to a Degree who refused to take the oaths.

To the Question why the Senate interposed in this affair & sent up Messengers to the Vice Chancellor. They answer that the Kings Mandate being communicated to the Senate according to its direction, the accepting the same would have passed for their act: especially since Degrees are not given by the Vice Chancellor without the senate consisting of a certain number of persons at the least & consenting either by vote or else by silence which in their proceedings usually passeth for an affirmative vote. They conceived themselvs obliged {also} by their oaths to interpose. For besides their oaths of Allegiance & supremacy whereby they promise to renounce all forreigne authoritie & to their power to assist & defend all authorities annexed to the Imperial Crown of England and by consequence to oppose as far as they may lawfully the abettors of forreign Authorities) they have obliged themselvs by their Matriculation oath to preserve the priviledges of the Vniversity as much as in them lies, & to save harmless the state honour & dignity thereof as long as they live & the same to defend by their vote & counsel whether askt or not askt, & other oaths to the <6r> same purpose are taken & repeated by every Graduate in his respective Degree. And even Noblemen themselvs who are excused from all other Oaths do make faith to the same purpose in verbo honoris. And further they represent that it is the natural right & priviledge of all Senates that their members may consult & advise one another concerning any business which comes before them, & the onely way whereby the houses in Senate or any of their members may conveniently consult the Vice Chancellor is by Messengers it being indecent for him to go down to them, & turbulent for any great Number of them to go up to him. That it is very frequent for persons to go up to him from the houses to advise or consult him either in their own Names or in the Names of whole Colledges, & by the same reason many or all the Colledges or Senate may consult him by one or more Messengers in any business which concerns the whole. That his late Majestie in a Letter to the Vniversity dated Decemb. 15th 1669 enjoyned that none in the regent house shall make any other address to the Vice Chancellor then by a reverent & respectfull application to him: whereby his said Majestie seems both to advise & to approve addresses of this nature; we humbly conceiving that the sence of both houses was communicated to the Vice Chancellor by their Messengers in the most modest quiet reverent & respectfull manner that they could think of. And the reason why these Messengers rather then others were chosen by the Senate was because of their being publick persons or Seniors of their houses.

<7r>

The Answer to some Questions propounded by the Lord Chancellor at the appearance of the Vicechancellor & Deputies of the Senate of the Vniversity of Cambridge before the Lords Commissioners May 7th 1687

To the Question what was the Vice Chancellors oath of office & of what antiquity?. They say, that the words of the oath are these: Iurabis quod bene et fideliter præstabis omnia quæ spectant ad officium Procancellarij hujus Academiæ: sic te Deus adjuvet: which office being stated & prescribed by the Laws of the Land & Statutes of the Vniversity, the Vice Chancellor is thereby obliged to observe faithfully those Laws, as far as they respect his office; a part of which laws were those recited in the beginning of the Answer of the Vice Chancellor & Senate formerly presented to their Lordships. Further the said oath they conceive to be as ancient as the office of Vice chancellorship, & that the breaches thereof do not onely make the Vice Chancellor forsworn, but also affect the whole Senate: the honour & dignity whereof {eac}h member is sworn to save harmless.

To the Question, Did you ever know the Kings Mandate for degrees declined before They answer; always in this case where the oaths have been refused. An instance of this was given in one Tatnel, who was a non-conformist & upon certificate from the Vniversity that he refused to take the said oaths his late Majestie was pleased to recall his particular Mandate for conferring the Degree of Dr of Divinity. And {they} further say, that Mr. Pereira, & Mr. Stephens, Servants to her Majesty the Queen Dowager, & Roman Catholicks, upon his late Majestys general Mandate for conferring Degrees on occasions of the Kings comming to the Vniversity had their graces passed by the Senate, but upon their refusing to take these oaths were not admitted.

To the Question, have you never admitted persons to Degrees without taking the Oaths? They answer, that they know not of any that have been so admitted, excepting onely Peers such as by the Custome of the Vniversity have been reputed Noblemen & are thereupon excused. As to other persons who take Degrees of Learning to use, exercise, supply, or occupy the same, (as the Statute words it) they represent that it has been the constant custome of the Vniversity to require the oaths. And for Dr. Lightfoot, in whom his Lordship instanced, they are fully satisfied that he did take the oaths, by reason that he subscribed the three Articles in their common Register, to which all persons taking the oaths do sett their hands, one of which Articles is the King's supremacy, & which subscription is all the Record they have, & consequently all the proof that can be expected of any mans taking the said oaths, the oaths themselvs being never recorded. And yet it is worthy of remark, that Dr Lightfoot took his Degree by the benefitt of the same Letters from which the aforesaid Pereira, & Stephens, upon their refusing to take the oaths, were excluded; as appears by the records of the Vniversity. And they hear that Dr Balaam affirms that he, & Dr. Lightfoot had their hands on the book together in swearing. And if it shall be represent (as they hear it is by some) that some persons in thir absence from the Vniversity & consequently without taking the said oaths haue been, admitted to degrees; they answer, that they took them by Proxy under hand & seale, in which instrument they empower <7v> Proxys to perform the ceremony of swearing for them, and in animam suam; & bind themselves to abide by those oaths, according to the practise of the civil Law, conserved not only in the Vniversity but also in the Church of Rome, as well formerly in this Nation, as still in other Countries. And further, if any one hath in any hurry of business, or otherwise, escaped taking them (an instance whereof will not easily be found) they conceive it was a transgression of the law punishable in the persons offending, & can be no just precedent for any to transgresse them wilfully, & thereby subject themselvs to the penalties thereof. And in general thus much may confidently be said, that no person was ever admitted to any Degree who refused to take the oaths: which is the true state of the present case.

To the Question, why the Senate interposed in this affair, & sent up Messengers to the Vice Chancellor? They answer, that the Kings Mandate being communicated to the Senate according to its direction their not taking notice of the same would have made it seem to be accepted by them, & so the admission of Mr Francis to a degree to pass for the act of the Vniversity: especially since Degrees are not given by the Vice Chancellor without the Senate, consisting of a certain Number of persons (22 at the least) & consenting either by vote or else by silence, which in their proceedings usually passeth for an affirmative vote . # < insertion from f 8r > # And as the Mandate was directed to all & consequently required obedience in them all, so the Lords Commissioners in their Summons advisedly accused the Vice Chancellor & Senate together of disobedience & the Vicechancellor & Senate returned one common answer & after hearing the Lord Chancellor reproved the Senate not for impertinent intermedling with what concerned them not, but for disobedience & uneasiness under his Majesties commands, & advised their obedience for the future. < text from f 7v resumes > They {conce}ived themselvs obliged also by their oaths, to interpose. For by their oaths of Allegiance & Supremacy they renounce all forreign Authority, & promise to their power to assist, and defend all Iurisdictions & Authorities annexed to the Imperial Crown of England & by consequence to oppose as far as they may lawfully, the abettors of forreign authorities ✝ < insertion from f 8r > # which they could not be said to do at present, & should disable themselves n great measure of doing for the future, if they should consent to the admission of such persons into their body, without insisting upon those oaths according to the trust reposed in the Vice Chancellour, & Senate, for defence of the Crown against them. And besides they have – < text from f 7v resumes > they have obliged themselvs by their Matriculation oath, to preserve the priviledges of the Vniversity as much as in them lies, & to save harmless the state, honour, & dignity thereof, as long as they live, & the same to defend by their vote, & counsel, whether askt, or not askt, & other oaths to the same purpose are taken, & repeated by every Graduate in his respective degree. And even Noblemen themselvs, who are excused from all other oaths, do make faith to the same purpose in verbo honoris. These are the reasons for the Senate's interposing, & for the manner of their doing it they represent, that it is the natural right & priviledge of all Senates, that their Members may consult & advise one another, concerning any business that comes before them; & the only way whereby the Houses in Senate, or any of their Members may conveniently consult the Vice Chancellor is by Messengers, it being indecent for him to go down to them, & turbulent for any great number of them to go up to him, where it may be conveniently avoided. That it is very frequent for persons to go up to him from the houses to advise or consult him, either in their own Names or in the Names of many others, or in the Names of whole Colledges, & by the same reason, all the Colledges, or Senate may consult him, by one or more Messengers, in any business which concerns the whole. <8r> That it would be a force upon the Senate to be required to be present at an act which cannot be done without them, & to have the thing communicated to them, in order to its being done, & yet, whilst they are averse from it, to be denyed all liberty of signifying their dissent. That a Grace is not the proper way of the Senate's signifying their dissent from the Vice Chancellor in an illegal Act; for Graces are proposed by private persons to the Vice Chancellor to be communicated to the Senate, & may be laid aside by him, or stop't by any one in the Head. That the Members of the Senate may protest against the Vice Chancellors acting amongst them contrary to his duty, & by consequence, may all of them severally request him to forbeare, & therefore are not to be blamed for signifying their dissent in a more quiet & modest way. That the Order in his late Majestys Letter to the Vniversity Decemb. 15th1669 against cursitation in the Senate, is to be understood of such needless, or indecent actions as disturbe the Senate; & barrs not fit motion in business, as in Scrutinies, writing & giving up votes, paying of mony to the Proctors, or other just occasions: and that one clause of the said order is, that none in the Regent house shall make any other address to the Vice Chancellor then by a reverent, & respectfull application to him: whereby his said Majestie seems both to approve & advise addresses of this nature; they humbly conceiving that the sence of both houses was communicated to the Vice Chancellor by their Messengers in the most modest, quiet, reverent, & respectfull manner that they could think of. For if in this Message there was any thing extraordinary 'twas suitable to the occasion, & not more extraordinary then protesting would have been which every one allows to be a lawfull act; & which not onely implys a right of signifying their dissent, whether immediately, or by Messengers, but also recommands the same as fit, & proper to be done, in the first place. And the reason why these Messengers, rather then others were chosen by the Senate, was because of their being publick persons or Seniors of their houses.

<9r>

The Answer to some Questions propounded by the Lord Chancellor at the Appearance of the Vice Chancellor & Deputies of the Senate of the Vniversity of Cambridge before the Lords Commissioners May 7th 1687.

To the Question, Did you ever know the Kings Mandate for Degrees declined before: They answer always in this case where the Oathes have been refused. An instance of this was given in one Tatnel who was a Non-conformist & upon Certificate from the Vniversity that he refused to take the said Oaths his late Majestie was pleased to recall his particular Mandate for conferring the Degree of Dr of Divinity. And they further say that Mr Perrera and Mr Stephens Servants to her Majesty the Queen Dowager & Roman Catholicks, upon his late Majestys generall Mandate for conferring Degrees on occasion of the Kings comming to the Vniversity had their graces passed by the Senate, but upon their refusing to take these Oaths were not admitted.

To the Question, Have you never admitted persons to Degrees without taking the Oaths. They answer that they know not of any that have been so admitted, excepting onely such as by the custome of the Vniversity have been reputed Noblemen. As to other persons who take Degrees of Learning to use exercise supply or occupy the same (as the statute words it) they represent that it has been the constant Custome of the Vniversity to require the Oaths. And for Dr Lightfoot in whom your Lordship instanced they are fully satisfied that he did take the Oaths by reason that he subscribed the three Articles in their common Register to which all persons taking the Oaths do sett their hands, one of which Articles is the Kings supremacy, and which subscription is all the Record they have & consequently all the proofe that can be expected from them of any mans taking the said Oaths, the Oaths themselves being never recorded. And yet in proofe of this Matter they further alledge that Dr Lightfoot took his Degree by the benefitt of the same Letters from which the aforesaid Perrera & Stephens were upon their refusing to take the Oaths excluded as appears by the Records of the Vniversity. And if any one shall represent (as they hear some doe) that he took a Degree in his absence from the Vniversity & consequently without taking the said Oaths; they answer that he did it by Proxy under hand & Seale in which instrument he empowers his Proxy to take the Oaths for him and binds himself to abide by those Oaths, according to the practise of the civil Law. And further if any one hath in any hurry of business or otherwise by oversight escaped taking them, they conceive it was a transgression of the Law punishable in the persons offending <8v> & can be no just precedent for any to transgress them willfully & thereby subject themselvs to the penalties thereof. And they further say that they are fully & particularly assured, that noe person was ever admitted to a Degree who refused to take the Oaths.

To the Questions why the Senate interposed in this affair & sent up Messengers to the ViceChancellor. They answer that the Kings Mandate being communicated to the Senate according to its direction they conceived themselvs obliged by their Oaths so to doe, for (besides their Oaths of Allegiance & Supremacy) all the Members of the Senate have obliged themselvs by their Matriculation Oaths to preserve the privileges of the Vniversity as much as in them lies, & to save harmless the State, honour & dignity of the Vniversity as long as they live, & the same to defend by their vote and Counsell whether askt or not askt. And further they represent that it is the naturall right & priviledge of all Senates that their Members may consult & advise one another concerning any business which comes before them, & the onely way whereby the houses in Senate or any of their Members may consult the Vicechancellor is by Messengers, it being indecent for him to goe down to them, & turbulent for any great Number of them to go up to him. That it is very frequent for persons to go up from him to the houses to advise or consult him either in their own Names or in the Names of many others or in the Names of whole Colledges, & by the same reason many or all the Colledges or Senate may consult him by one or more Messengers in any business which concerns the whole. That his late Majestie in a Letter to the Vniversity dated Decemb. 15th 1669 enjoyned that none in the Regent house shall make any other address to the Vice chancellor then by reverent & respectfull application to him: whereby his said Majestie seems both to advise & approve addresses of this nature; we humbly conceiving that the sense of both houses was communicated to the Vice Chancellor by their Messengers in the most modest quiet reverent & respectfull manner that they could think of. And the reason why these Messengers rather then others were chosen by the Senate was because of their being publick persons or Seniors of their houses.

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