<1r>

Sr Isaac Newton represents that he did formerly discourse \wth your Lordp/ about the ancient year of 360 days & represented to your Lordp that it was the Calendar of the ancient Lunisolar year [of the Egyptians Syrians Chaldeans Asiatics Greeks {who} &c; {illeg} that being \that it was/] composed of the nearest round number of days in a Lunar month & Lunar months in a Solar year; that the ancients corrected this Kalendar monthly by the {illeg} new moons & yearly by the returns of the four{illeg} seasons, dropping a day or two when they found the \calendar/ month too long, {adding} for the course of the Moon & adding a month to ye end of the year when they found the calendar year too short for the return of the seasons; [that for avoyding the trouble of these \so/ frequent corrections, several cycles of months & years were invented, as a cycle of 12 months consisting of 30 & 29 {illeg} days alternately, the Dieteris consisting of \two/ years of 12 & 13 months alternately, the Octaeteris consisting of four Dieterises wanting a month, the cyclus Decemnovalis, the Dodecaeteris of the Chaldees, &c; that the Egyptians by adding five days to the end of their calendar year formed a solar year of 365 days wch the Romans corrected by adding a day to ye end of every four years; that the Arabians by omitting omitting the intercalary months have formed their year of 12 Lunar months; that the Luni-solar, the Solar & the Lunar years are all the & their Calendars are all the sorts of years wch he met|e|ts with \in/ antiquity;] that {illeg} Moses in describing the flood uses the Kalendar months without correcting them by the course of the Moon, the cloudy rainy weather not suffering her to appear; that when [the Athenians erected 360 statues to Demetrius Phalareus according to the number of {illeg} days in the year, or] Herodotus reccons 30 days to the month & 12 months to ye year they \he/ understood the Kalendar year wthout correcting it by the courses of the Sun & Moon; that when Herodotus reccons by years of 12 & 13 months alternately for 70 years together wthout correcting the months by the course of the Moon; & \it by the Luminaries/ that when we meet wth a week of years or a month of years or a year of years, a Kalendar month of natural years &|or| a Kalendar year of natural years, [that is, 7 or 30 or 360 natural years, taking any number of natural years for so many revolutions of winter & summer; [that the Iews in returning from captivity called their own months by the names of the Chaldean, wch argues that they were the same;] & that he meets wth nothing in yor Lordps paper wch \in his opinion/ makes against these his opinions what he then represented to your Lordp.

<1v>

He saith also that \within the compass of the 4 monarchies/ he meets with no other year {illeg} the to this day then the Lunisolar propagated by Noah to his posterity, the solar of 365 days [corrected by ye Romans by the addition of a day in 4 years,] & the Lunar used by the Mahometans, & the Kalendars of these years; that for lessening the trouble of correcting the \primitive/ Lunisolar Kalendar every month by the Moon & every year by the sun, various cycles were invented, as the annual cycle of 30 & 29 days in the mōth alternately, the Dieteris cosisting {sic} of 12 & 13 months alterna in the year alternately, the Octaeteris consisting of 4 Dieterises wanting a month, the Dodecaeteris of the Chaldees mentioned by Censorinus c      & conteining, as he thinks, 4 intercalary months, & the Sarus of the Chaldees mentioned by Suidas (in Σάρος) & consisting of 18 years of 12 lunary months each, besides six months wch he takes to be intercalary, a month being added every third year for 18 years together.

Sr Isaac saith further that in his opinion the {illeg} original year of all nations was Lunisolar, the same being wth its calendar being propagated down from Noah to all his posterity. That for keeping to the courses of the Sun & Moon or one of them without the trouble of correcting the year montly {sic} by the Moon & yearly by the sun & return of ye seasons & fruits of the earth various cycles & emendations of the primitive calendar have been invented as the cycle of Months consisting of 30 & 29 days alternately during the whole year, the intercalation of a month every other year wch made the Trieteris of the Ancients more properly called the Dieteris The Octaeteris composed of 4 Dieterises wanting a month. The          \or Dodecaeteris/ of the Chaldees composed of twelve years The Sarus of the Chaldees composed of 18 years & 6 intercalary months. The \Egyptian/ Cycle of 365 days \The Iulian & Gregorian corrections of that year/. The Arabian cycle of 12 Lunar months {where} perpetually without any intercalary months.

<2r>
Copper per T Tun 100
Melter 16
Graver {illeg} 2. {illeg}|2|. 6
Smith 2. 2. 6
Moneyer 412 42. 0. 0
2.16.0
Master 12 4. 13. 4
A Clerks p{illeg}p {illeg} 0.10.0
A Clerk for the Queen0.10.0
Paper & packthred & {baggs}0.5.0
112, 20. 168. 3. 4

24.

8. 8. 2 per ton symbol in text

1. 1 014 per 14lwt

0. 3. 0128per 2lwt

1. 6156

[Editorial Note 1] <2v>

In the 37th year of Iehojakins captivity, in ye 12th month on ye 27th day of ye {month} \that is, in the end of ye {month}/ Evilmerodach king of Babylon in the year that he began to reign, brought Iehokim out of prison & treated him honourably as his \friend &/ companion 2 King 25.27. Evilmerodach had been imprisoned by his father, & {illeg} by that means \{hi|e|s}/ grew acquainted wth Iehojakin.

The eighteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar was the tenth of Zedekiah (Ier. 32.1). The tenth year And this was this that is the tenth of Iehojakins captivity. & t|T|he 37th of this \year of Iehojakins/ captivity was {the} first yea year in wch Nebuchadnezzar died & was succeeded by his son Evilmerodach. In all ye \For/ On {sic} ye 27th day of the 12th month of this year \(the year in wch he began to reign)/ Evilmerodach (who had been imprisoned by his father & ther {sic} grew acquainted wth Zedekiah) brought Zedekiah out of prison & treated him honourably as his companion (2 King 25.27) And therefore \from this friendship/ it may be presumed that Nebuchadnezzar died at that time & Evilmerodach in ye very beginning of his reign brought Zedekiah out of prison himself to succeed his father |upon the death of Nebuchadnezzar \his father/ when the people brought Iehojakin \him/ out of prison to reign he brought Iehojakin out of prison at the same time|. Nebuchadnezzar therefore reined 45 years according to the recconing of the Iews, vizt 8 years to the captivity of Iehojakin & 37 years more to his death \the reign of Euilmerodac/, For {its} \{illeg}/ /the\ 18th year \of Nebuchadnezzar/ was the 10th year of Zedekiah (Ier 32.1) that is the 10th of Iehojakins captivity. But according to the c|C|anon Nebuchadnezzar reigned but 43 years from the death of his father Nabapolasser, so that \& therefore/ the 3d year of his reign according to the Iewish account was the first year of his reign fro recconed from the death of his father by the Chaldees. The Iews dated his reign from ye 4th year of Iehojakim, the year in wch he beat {illeg} the Egyptians at Euphrates (Ier 46.3) & began his reign \& succeeded Pharaoh Nechoh in his {domi}nion/ over Syria & Iudæa. For the 4th of Iehojakim was the first of Nebuchadnezzar (Ier. 25.1.) And while he was making war in Syria & Iudea he heard of the death of his father (suppose in the 3d year of his reign over the Iews) & then returned to Babylon to succeed his|m| father \leaving his army & {captives} wth his servants to follow him/. The taking of Ierusalem & burning of ye Temple wch was in the 19th year of Nebuchadn. according to ye Iewish account was \therefore/ in the 17th of his reign according to the Chaldean account & Canon of Ptolomy & from ye fift month of this yea burning of the City & Temple in the 5t month of this year to ye 9th month of the 4th year of Darius Hi|y|staspis are 70 years & 4 months, at \the end of/ wch time the people had fasted 70 years upon ye 5t month for the burning of the city & Temple & |upon ye| 7th month for the death of Gedaliah. Zech 7.5. And \so/ the Prophet might then very well say: When ye fasted & mourned in the 5t & seventh month even those seventy years, did ye at all fast unto me? Zech 7.5.

Iudæa was \& the cities thereof were/ invaded by the Chaldees in ye 9th year of Zedekiah & many of the cities taken & in the tenth month of that year Ierusalem was beseiged 2 Reg. 25.1. And from thence to ye eleventh of the second year of Darius Hystaspis were 70 years. so that \And therefore/ in the end of that time the Prophet might well say: O Lord of hosts how long will|t| thou not have mercy on Ierusalem & on the cities of Iudah against wch thou hast had Id|n|dignation these 70 years. Zech. 1.12.

< insertion from f 1v > ✝ And tho the intervalls should have been a year or two more or less then \under or o{ver}/ 70 \years/, yet I see not why \had rather allow that/ the Prophet might not have been allowed to use the nearest round number of seventy, then run into greater greater {sic} difficulties.

For that Zerubbabel – – sight?

As for Iddo

< text from f 2v resumes >

And by the like recconing, \there were/ from the first \fourth/ year of Iehojakim to the first of Cyrus over Persia were 70 years, as there ought to be by the prophesy of Ieremiah ch. 25.1, 11, 12. & 2 Chron. 36.22.

As for Iddo the father of Barachiah & grandfather of Zechariah, he he might be 70 or above 70 years old in ye first year of Cyrus & his son Barachiah might \then/ be \about/ 50 years & his grandson Zechariah \about/ 25 years old \more or less/. And in the 2d year of Darius Hystaspis Zechariah might be about 40 years old.

But that Zerubbabel should be governour of the Iews to the sixt {year of} D{arius} Nothus that is 118 years together, & Ieshua be High Priest all that time is not probable. And it is less probable that \in the second year of that King/ there should be old men alive in ye second year of that king who had seen the first Temple which was burnt 166 years before. Hagg. 2.3. He that thinks it probable let him ask his Congregation from the Pulpit: Who is there among you who <2r> remb|e|mber the face & stature of king Henry VIII & how do ye see men now? Are they not as nothing in your sight?

And as for ye age of Zechariah the Prophet the son of Barachiah & grandson of Iddo, he might be 30 or 40 years old in ye 2d year of Darius when he began to prophesy, & by consequence about 14 or 24 in the first year of Cyrus over Persia, & his Gradfather {sic} Iddo might then be 60 or 70 or above.

<3r>

Sr Isaac Newton represents that he did formerly discourse with your Lordp. about ye ancients year of 360 days, & represented to yor Lordp that it was the Kalendar of the ancient Lunisolar year composed of the nearest round number of Lunar months in a year & days in a lunar month; that the ancients corrected this Kalendar monthly by the New-moons & yearly by the returns of ye 4 seasons, dropping a day or two when they found the Kalendar month of 30 days too long for the course of the Moon & adding a month to the end of the year when they found the year of 12 Lunar months too short for the return of the four seasons & fruits of ye earth; that Moses in describing the Flood uses the Kalendar months without correcting them by the course of the Moon, the cloudy rainy weather not suffering her then to appear; that when Herodotus or any other author reccons 30 days to ye month & 360 days to the year, he understands the Kalendar month & year without correcting them by the courses of the Sun & Moon; that when Herodotus reccons years of 12 & 13 months alternately for 70 years together, he understands the Dieteris of the ancients continued for 70 years without correcting it by the Luminaries; that when we read of a week of or a month or a year \consisting/ of any other days then the natural, we are to reccon 7 days or 30 days or 360 days according to the Kalendar because in such cases \where the days are not natural ones {illeg}/ the Kalendar cannot |be| corrected by the courses of the Sun & Moon; {illeg}|and| if the mystical days signify days are|be| taken mystically for |ye| years \of any nation/ we are to take these years in the vulgar sense for so many natural years or revolutions of summer & winter; |7 or 30 or 360 practical years of the {latines} such as they commonly {used in} civil affairs.| & \or years corrected by the Luminaries Sr Isaac saith further/ that he meets with nothing in your Lordps paper wch in his opinion makes against what he then represented to your Lordp.

|Ecbatane.| Eusebius tells us that the writers of the Babylonian affairs say that Arbaces Belesis Arbaces made Belesis king of the Assyrians. It seems that Arbaces \a Mede/ & Belesis of & at Babylon {Artimenech}, Belesis of {sic} the Generals of the Assyrians conspired against the sloatfull king & shared his dominions, {illeg} but over Media & so much of Assyria as did not revolt from the dominion of & Assyria & sor & & Assyria, & at the

Others say that Arbaces a Mede & Belesis or Bali one of the General Commanders of ye forces of the Medes Sardanapalus, upon seing the luxurious life of his king conspired against him together with Bele{illeg}sis another of his general commanders & Eusebius tells us that the writers of the Babylonian affairs say that Arbaces made Belesis king of the Assyrians. I suppose he means king over so much of the Baby Assyrian Empire as remained in subjection to Nineveh. In the year of Nabonassar 81 |For the old age as well as ye These luxurious life of this king seem to have given occasion to the revolt of several nations & these things seem to have happened in the year of Nabonassar 81.| These things seem to have been done in the year of Nabonassar 81: for at that time the reign of Asserhadon over Babylon ceased, & Chiniladon Saosducinus succeeded him in that kingdom, & by the revolt of the Balonians {sic} & western nations – – – Nechao.

The last king of the Assyrians is called Saracus by Polyhistor. Others take this king for the Sardanapalus of the ancients. And thence Callisthenes relates that there were two kings of Nineveh called Sardanapalus, one stout & valiant, the other soft & effeminate. The first wthout question was Asserhaddon, the last was vanquished by lost his kingdom to Cyaxeres & Nebuchadnezzar wthout a revolt of the Medes wch is not the character of Sardanapalus. So then after Sardanapalus there were th{ree} kings reigned in Nineveh, Belisis, Nebuchadonosor & Saracus.

Arbaces was They revolted under the conduct of Abades \who was/ a Mede & \one of the/ General commanders of of Assyria \the forces of/ Sardanapalus. He was encouraged the revolt by the luxurious & effeminate life of his king & con This Officer \He/ was encouraged to revolt by the luxurious & effeminate life of his king, & perhaps also by his old age, & conspired with one Belesis another commander of the Assyrian forces & their {con} Eusebius tells us that the writers of the Babylonian affairs say that Arbaces made Belesis king of the Assyrians. I suppose he means king of so much of the Assyrian Empire as \after the revolting of {illeg} the western nations some other nations/ remained in subjection to Nineveh. This revolution happened in the year of Nabonassar 81. For at that time Asserhadon was <3v> {succeeded} at Babylon by Saosduchinus. And by this revolt of revolution Manasses

Sardanapalus by his old age is is said to \have/ built Tarsus & Anchiale in one day & to have been the son of Anacyndaraxis & or as other name him Anabaxaris. I suppose they mean Sennacherib. The kings who reigned after him in Media were Arbaces Dioces Phaortes Astyages, Cyaxeres & Darius, those at Babylon were Saosduchinus Chinildon, Nabopolaser & Nebuchadnezzar \& his sons/, & those at Nineveh, I think, were Belesis Nebuchadonosor & Saracus. By Nebuchadonosor I understand that king of Assyria who is mentioned in the book of Iudeth: for

Some time after this Temple was built, the Iews added a new court on on ye eastern side of the Priests court before the kings gate (2 Chron XX.5) & therein built a covert for the sabbath, 2 King. XVI.18. This court was not Measured \by/ Ezekiel but the dimensions may be gathered from those of ye weomens court built b in the second Temple built in imita after the example thereof. Whence I seem to gather that this court with the Priests court & separate place \& {inner buildings}/ took up an area three hundred cubits long from east to west & two hundred cubits broad, the Altar standing in the center of the whole, & by consequence that the new court alone was only 50 cubits broad from east to west. // He seems to have omitted the buildings on ye east side of the peoples court Priests court & to have walled in the area thereof together wth that of the new court for the use of the people. For the outward \court/ wch in Solomons Temple was for the use of the people he left unbuilt & the Gentiles had access into it while the people worshipped \only/ in the new court & the eastern margin of the Priests court \&/ therefore he enlarged the new court for the use of the people, & made it 100 cubits square with courts \little kitchins/ in the four corners for kittchens for the dressing the sacrifices for the people. Thus Zerubbals {sic} temple conteined was built on an area 300 cubits long from north to south, & conteined thre equal courts & 200 broad wth a & conteined an wth the Altar in its center & conteined three equal courts, the separate place – – – –

– sanctuary, & had on the east side of it a court for ye people called the weomens court, wch made the whole area 300 cubits long \from east to west/ & two m 200 broad. The outward court ther the altar standing in ye center thereof. And this area conteined three courts each equal courts, the separate place the priests court & the weomens court, each 100 cubits from east to west & 135 from north to south between the buildings, or 200 in For the buildings took 65 cubits, 3212 on either side. The outward court was left unb form of – – – – – – in their {illeg} four corners For the pe outward court was not built, but the ground thereof left open to the gentiles. And therefore the kitchins for the people were placed in the corners of the weomens court. And to make more room for the people the buildings on the east side of the Priests court were omitted & the {4} added to ye weomens court. < insertion from the left margin > the height being 60 cubits & the high & 60 broad including the treasure chambers. & on Either side were double buildings – – –

< text from f 3v resumes >

The buildings on ye east side were omitted & the area on wch they stood was added to the new court to make more room for the people. & this c All this taking in an area 200 cubits

All this \taking in ye peoples court/ . . . . . each 100 cubits square. The building double buildings were on the north & south sides of the separate place & Priests court, & together with those \two/ courts took up a square area of 200 cubits on either side long & 200 broad & was strictly called the sanctuary. The buildings on the east side were omitted, & the area on wch they stood was added to the weomens court to make more room for the people. And in the corners instead of the little courts or kitchins in the four corners of the great court there were little corners courts in the four corners of the weomens court. And between the little co\u/rts & the buildings on either side the Priests court & separate space there was an interval of 135 cubits from north to south & in conformity to Solomons Temple the Priests court had Gates over against the altar on the southern northern & eastern sides; & the buildings on either side the separate place were without cloysters & had kitchings at their western ends & a walk 10 cubits broad before them distinguished from the separate place by a wall. And the \house or/ Temple itself was

[Editorial Note 1] The following passage is written upside down on f. 2, with an insertion (also written upside down) from f. 1v.

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