<348r>

If Copper be mixed with any other base metall or semi-metall it will not endure the hammer when red hot but fly in pieces. So soon as it is refined by the Copper-workers {d}|t|o that degree as to be purged from all other base metalls, it begins to endure the hammer hen red h{illeg}|o|t & to be worth about 98 or 100li per Tunn; & such copper they call fine copper. For making Copper Vessels they refine it a littl{illeg}|e| higher, & for drawing into wyer they refine it still higher. But for money it suffices to refine it till it begins to beare the ha{illeg}|m|mer when red hot. They that work in copper can readily judge of the fineness also by breaking off a little piece & observing the grain & colour where it breaks. There is also a way of assaying copper by separating the other base metalls from it, but the assay by the hammer I reccon sufficient for the Mint. For it will be proper for the Master & Worker not to receive course copper & put it out to refine as is done in gold & silver, but only to receive it when refined to the degree above mentioned.

In the reign of King Charles II a pound weight of Swedish copper was cut into 20d. The copper & making the blanks cost 1{illeg}|8|d the stamping {illeg}|1|d, & a penny remained for other charges.

A pound weight of fine English copper such as will endure the assay above mentioned will \cost/ 1012d or 1034d, & the coynage will cost 512 or 534 including the work of the Smith & Graver: so that the whos|l|e charge of copper & coynage will scarce exceed 1612d per pound weight averdupoise. And if the same be edged the edging will cost a penny more. And if a pound weight not edged be cut into 19d, or a pound weight edged be cut int{illeg}|o| 20d, there will remain 212d per pound weight for purchasing Mills & Presses & setting up a copper Mint, & paying Clerks & incident charges of assaying, weighing, telling, porterage/,\ putting off, &c

The Mills & Presses & other Engines for setting up a copper Mint will cost six or seven hundred pounds. And three farthings per p{illeg}|o|und weight in coy{illeg}|n|ing an hundred tunns will pay that charge. And when a copper Mint is set up, a pound weight of copper may be cut int{illeg}|o| 1812d or 18d not edged, or a penny more if edged.

The weight of all the copper received, & the weight & ta{illeg}|le| of all the copper money coined may be entred in books & in the Master & Workers account, & the surplus above all charges may be paid into the Exchequer.

<350r>

If Copper be mixed with any other base metal or semi-metal it will not endure the hammer when red hot but fly in pieces. So soon as it is refined by the Copper-workers to that degree as to be purged from all other base metals, it begins to endure the hammer hen red hot & to be worth about 98 or 100li per Tunn; & such copper they call fine {t}|c|opper. For making Copper vessels they refine it a little higher & for making wyer they refine it still higher: but for {illeg}|m|oney it suffices to refine it till it begins to beare the hamne|m|er when red hot. They that work in Copper can readily judge of the fineness also by breaking off a little piece & observing the grain & colour where it breaks. There is also a way of {s}|a|ssaying copper by separating the other base metals from it, but the assay by the hammer I reccon sufficient for the Mint. For it will be proper for the Master & Worker not to receive course copper & put it out to refine as is done in gold & silver but only to received it when refined to the degree above mentioned

In the reign of King Charles II a pound weight of Swedish Copper cost {illeg} was cut into 20d. The copper & making the blancks cost 18d, the stamping {illeg}|1|d, & a penny remained for other charges.

A pound weight of fine English copper such as will endure the assay above mentioned will cost 1012d or 1034 & coynage will cost 512 or 534d including the work of the Smith & Graver, so that the whole charge of copper & coinag{illeg}|e| will scarce exceed 1612d per pound weight averdupois. And if the same be edged the edging will cost a penny more. And if a pound weight not edged be cut into 19d or a pound weight edged be cut into 20d there will remain 212 per pound weight for purchasing Mills & Presses & setting up {illeg}|a| Copper Min{illeg}|t| & paying Clerks & incident charges of Assaying, weighing, telling, Porters \putting off/ &c

The Mills Presses & other Engins for setting up a Copper Mint will cost six or seven hundred pounds. And thre{illeg}|e| farthings per pound weight in coining an hundred Tunns will pay that charge. And when a Copper Mint is set up, a pound weight of copper may be cut into 1812d or 18d not edged, or a penny more if edged.

The weight of all the Copper received, & the weight & tale of all the copper money coined & made fit for delivery to be entred in Books & in the Master & Workers account, & the surplus to be paid into ye Exchequer.

<358r>

The Master to account for ye coynage & pay the surplus of all charges into the Civil list.

The weight of all the Copper received & the weight & tale of all the Copper money coyned & made fit for delivery to be entred in books, & the Master to stand charged thereby & account for the same & to pay the surplus of all charges into ye Excheqr,

That about 12d pr lwt be allowed to him shall put off the copper money.

© 2019 The Newton Project

Professor Rob Iliffe
Director, AHRC Newton Papers Project

Scott Mandelbrote,
Fellow & Perne librarian, Peterhouse, Cambridge

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL - newtonproject@history.ox.ac.uk

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