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76.

Chemical notes, partly in another hand.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1007 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00077

77.

Notebook containing abstracts and notes drawn from various alchemical works.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1023 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00078

78.

Notes and abstracts 'Ex Fabri Hydrographo Spagyrico' (f. 1r) and 'Ex Palladio Spagyrico' (f. 2r), with page references (1690s?).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1024 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00079

79.

'Notanda Chymica' (late 1660s).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1028 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00080

80.

Two incomplete treatises on the vegetative growth of metals and minerals

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1031 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00081

81.

Three related sets of notes (late 1680s-90s).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1032 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00082

82.

Two accounts of alchemical operations (1690s?).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1041 B, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00083

83.

Draft alchemical treatise or compilation.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: NMAHRB Ms. 1070 A, Dibner Library, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00084

84.

Dictionary of (al)chemical terms, materials and apparatus (late 1660s-early 1670s), with directions for performing various operations.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. Don b.15, Bodleian Library, Oxford, UK

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00085

85.

Excerpts (probably made in the 1690s) from the correspondence between Edmund Dickinson and Theodorus Mundanus published by the former. In Latin.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 129, Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00086

86.

Newton's copy of 'Philalethes'' [i.e. George Starkey's] Secrets Reveal'd, with corrections and additions in Newton's hand on almost every page.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Library of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00087

87.

Two sets of notes on La lumière sortant par soy même des tenebres.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 414, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00088

88.

Notes 'Ex Rosario Magno', 2 pp. on.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 415, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00089

89.

Miscellaneous alchemical notes and emblems, in Latin and English with some French.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 416, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00090

90.

A large compilation of alchemical citations woven into a continuous text (1690s).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 417, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00091

91.

'Lib. chem.' and 'Manuscriptu[m] meum' (c. 1696-7).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 418, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00092

92.

'Of Chemicall Authors & their writings' (c. 1670-75).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 419, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00093

93.

'Praxis' (certainly after 1689, probably c. 1696): an alchemical treatise, with notes and an earlier draft.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 420, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00094

94.

Three sets of chemical notes.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 421, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00095

95.

Draft letter or memo (1669?).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 433, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00096

96.

'Experimts of refining Gold wth Antimony made by Dr. Ionathan Goddard'.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 725, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00097

97.

'Miscellanea': Latin notes on experiments, chiefly from Ramón Lull's 'Codicillus' and 'Testamentum' and Zetzner's Theatrum Chemicum.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Ms. 747, The Babson College Grace K. Babson Collection of the Works of Sir Isaac Newton, Huntington Library, San Marino, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00098

98.

A series of lists of authors and books on alchemy.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: M132/2/3, Stanford University Library, Stanford, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00099

99.

'De Scriptoribus Chemicis' (mostly late 1660s/early1670s though with later additions).

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: M132/2/4, Stanford University Library, Stanford, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00100

100.

'To make Lucatello's Balsome': a medical recipe, efficacious against 'ye Measell Plague or Small Pox [...] & against poyson & ye biting of a mad dog'.

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: M132/2/5, Stanford University Library, Stanford, California, USA

Newton Catalogue ID: ALCH00101

[1]

The first sheet contains a brief alchemical recipe in another hand, copied out again in Newton's. The second has a Latin extract from Basil Valentine on distillation, followed by a related recipe in English, all in Newton's hand.

[2] 2 pp. on 2 ff.

[3]

in English and Latin

[4]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 107. This manuscript (minus the putative index) is also reproduced on R19 of the Chadwyck-Healey microfilm, between Keynes Mss. 64 and 65 (this has perhaps come from a photostat of the notebook held at Keynes Ms. 221). This would appear to be a mistake, since there is no reference to its presence there in the Chadwyck-Healey catalogue.

[5]

On the flyleaf in Thomas Pellet's hand: 'Sep. 25 1727/ Not fit to be printed/ Tho. Pellet'. Main text preceded by 5 unnumbered pages prepared as an index but containing only columns of alphabetical headings (eg. 'Suo/ Suu/ Ta/ Taa/ Tae') and one blank page. The main text has the following sub-headings, though besides the sources given by these there are references on pp. 48-9 to 'Laurent. Ventura' and Ramón Lull's 'Theorica', and on pp. 50-51 to 'Anonym[us] de Arte Chim[ica] in Arte Aurif[era]'.

p. 1 'Ex Rosarij abbreviati tract. quinq[ue]' [This is not, as stated in the Sotheby catalogue, taken from the Rosarius Philosophorum of Arnoldus de Villanova, but from an anonymous tract entitled 'Rosarium Abbreviatum', which appeared in vol. 3 of Zetzner's Theatrum Chemicum as part of 'Justus a Balbian. Tractatus septem de Lapide Philosophico' (first pub.1599, though Newton is extremely unlikely to have seen that edition), Balbian being the editor rather than the author of the collection: see Ferguson, Bibliotheca Chemica, 2: 287 and 437.]

p. 15 'Ex Petri Boni Lombardi Ferrariensis Margarita Pretiosa'

p. 24 'Ex Dionysij Zacharij Opusculo'

p. 31 'Out of Philaletha's works concerning the extraction of [sulphur] out of [mercury]', in Latin and English

p. 51 'Ex Clangore Buccinæ'

[6] 61 pp. + 208 pp. blank.

[7]

mainly in Latin with some English

[8]

Both works cited are by the French alchemist Pierre Jean Fabré.

[9]

See H598 for Newton's copy of Fabré's complete works, and Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[10] 4 pp. on 2 ff.

[11]

in Latin

[12]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[13]

Notes and extracts, with page references, chiefly from Michael Maier's Arcana arcanissima, though there is also reference to the 'Rosarium Philosophorum' from Zetzner's Theatrum Chemicum.

[14] 5 pp. (though there is only one word and a page reference on p. 5).

[15]

in Latin

[16]

Both texts are related to the 'Hypothesis explaining the Properties of Light' Newton sent to the Royal Society in December 1675.

Reproduced in facsimile as an appendix to B.J.T. Dobbs, Alchemical Death. The English portion is described and transcribed in Dobbs, Janus Faces, 256-70 (Dobbs treats the first of the twelve subjects for enquiry as the title of the entire document). See also her 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 107, and P.M. Rattansi, 'Newton's Alchemical Studies'.

[17]

The first treatise (11 pp., in English) begins with a list of 12 numbered subjects for discussion, forming a putative draft outline of the work (though the text itself frequently departs from the sequence of subjects listed): e.g. '1 Of natures obvious laws & processes in vegetation', '2 That metalls vegetate after the same laws', etc. The very heavy reworking of the main text and absence of reference to other sources strongly suggest Newton's own composition, making this a centrally important document indicating the nature of his 'chymical' views in the mid-1670s. It is quite without accounts of specific laboratory processes and quite devoid of allegorical or symbolic terminology, and seems to represent the beginnings of an attempt to formulate a coherent and comprehensive theory of chemistry.

The second, shorter treatise is in Latin and written from the back of the document, beginning on f. 6v and continuing onto f. 6r. This is a distinct but closely related work also shedding important light on Newton's chymical and natural philosophical views, though until recently it has been almost wholly neglected by Newton scholars.

[18] 12 pp.

[19]

in English and Latin

[20]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106-7 and 'Newton's Copy of "Secrets Reveal'd"', 159.

[21]

Entitled 'The Regimen' (7 pp.), 'The Regimen', (8 pp.) and 'Of ye Regimen' (2 pp., incomplete). Describe a sequence of (al)chemical operations largely drawn from the works of 'Philalethes', though other authors including Pontanus, Maier and Roger Bacon are cited, especially in the second set of notes. On the loose scrap (which is not mentioned in the Sotheby catalogue, though the manuscript is described as 18 pp. and the catalogue does not normally count blank pages), various alchemical references, with mention of John Day and of Roger Bacon's Elementorum and Michael Maier's Arcana arcanissima, written over and on the reverse of a receipt dated 11 September 1689.

[22] 8 pp. badly discoloured and barely legible.

[23]

in English

[24]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[25]

1) 'Separatio Elementorum' (2 pp.). On the distillation of elements in a 20 gallon vat, with references to 'Philalethes' and Albertus Magnus. The large number of corrections and relatively small number of references to other writers may indicate that this is at least partly Newton's own composition.

2) 'Reductio et Sublimatio' (5 pp.). Excerpts and abstracts, principally from Lull, on an imperfect transmutation of white sulphur into silver and red sulphur into gold.

[26] 7 pp.

[27]

in Latin

[28]

See Dobbs, 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 107; also H994-1001 for Newton's Lull collection. Bernoulli's letter printed in Brewster (1855), 2: 437-8.

[29]

Largely drawn, with page references, from various other works, principally those of Lull and 'Philalethes' but also Ripley, Snyders, Flamel, Sendivogius, Fabré, Arnoldus de Villanova, Van Helmont and others. Clearly represents an attempt to establish a sequence of operations: 'Opus primum', 'Opus secundum', etc. (cf. Keynes Mss. 40, 41 and Babson Ms. 421); the operations covered here are numbered 1-2 and 6-9). Very rough, heavily reworked draft, several sections incomplete.

Also includes three scraps of unrelated correspondence (1700, 1718, n.d.) and a transcript (in another hand, annotated by Newton) of Bernoulli's letter of 8 April 1717 to Montmort, in French, concerning Newton and Leibniz. These are unmentioned in the rather cursory Sotheby catalogue description of SL66, which gives the total page count as 43 pp.; some or all of the letters are presumably a later addition, though why they have been catalogued together with the foregoing treatise is a mystery.

[30] 42 pp. + 4 pp. of unrelated material.

[31]

in Latin with odd passages in English

[32]

Entries run alphabetically from 'Abstraction' to 'Vrinous Salt'. In some cases the headword is followed only by a gap in which to insert the definition. Refers to Boyle's Of Formes and Qualities (1666), but much appears to be Newton's own work.

[33] 16 pp.

[34]

in English

[35]

Described as c. 2,500 words in both the Sotheby and Hary Ransom catalogues, but this seems a very conservative estimate.

[36]

H513 is Newton's copy of Dickinson's Epistola Edmundi Dickinson M.D. & Medica Regii ad Theodorum Mundanum Philosophum Adeptum. De Quintessentia Philosophorum et De Vera Physiologia. [...] His Accedunt Mundani responsa (1686). Newton seems to have thought highly of this work and cited or referred to it frequently in his alchemical compilations of the 1690s (see Westfall, Never at Rest, 290-91, n. 32, and Dobbs, 'Newton's Copy of "Secrets Reveal'd"', 157 and n. 64). See also Keynes Ms. 26 for Newton's later alchemical discussions with a friend of Dickinson and Boyle.

[37]

f. 1r 'Ex Epist. Edmundi Dickenson ad Theodorum Mundanum. Dat Londini prid. Cal. Aug. [i.e. 31 July] 1683 edit 1686': this includes a list of eleven questions about alchemical terminology which are answered by Mundanus in the rest of the document, as follows:

f. 1v 'Ex Theodori Mundani Responso Dat. Parisijs 10 Cal. Octob. [i.e. 20 September] 1684'

f. 2v 'De materia lapidis'

f. 3r 'De Mercurio Philosophorum'

f. 4v 'De Philosophorum auro'

f. 5r 'De Monte Philosophorum'

'De Philosophorum Mari'

f. 5v 'De Philosophorum aqua vitæ'

'De Philosophorum Diana'

f. 7v 'De secreto Philosophorum igne'

f. 8v 'De medicamento Vniversali'

'De Patriarcharum longævitate'

[38] 16 pp. on 8 ff.

[39]

See Dobbs, 'Newton's Copy of "Secrets Reveal'd"', and H1478.

[40]

Secrets Reveal'd: or, An Open Entrance to the Shut-Palace of the King: Containing, the greatest Treasure in Chymistry [...] Composed By a most famous English-man Styling himself Anonymus, or Eyræneus Philaletha Cosmopolita [...] Published for the Benefit of all English-men, by W.C. Esq. [i.e. William Cooper]' (1669)

[41]

See H1003. Ms. 414B is transcribed together with Yahuda Var. 1 Ms. 30 as a single reunited text, with notes, in Dobbs, Janus Faces, 278-87.

[42]

Ms. 414A (late 1690s or later): 'Ex Lumine de tenebris': 2 pp. of notes constituting Newton's abstracts of his own earlier abstracts (Yahuda Var. 1 Ms. 30 and Babson Ms. 414B).

Ms. 414B (c. 1687-92): the end of the series of abstracts from this work of which the beginning is now Yahuda Var. 1 Ms. 30, 3 pp.

[43] 5 pp. on 3 ff.

[44]

in English

[45]

Elucidations of alchemical symbolism with page references to the 'Rosarium Philosophorum' in Zetzner's Theatrum Chemicum (H1608) [this was commonly referred to as 'Rosarium Magnum' to distinguish it from various other 'philosophical rosaries': see Ferguson, Bibliotheca Chemica, 2: 287].

[46] 4 ff.

[47]

in Latin with some English

[48]

Described in the Sotheby catalogue as 1 p. + 25 pp.: it is not clear whether this is an error or whether something has been added. Described still more perplexingly in the Babson catalogue as '19 pages of manuscript on 20 leaves', though the following description proceeds to cover all 28 pages.

[49]

A

1. 'Lapis Philosophicus cum suis rotis elementaribus', 1 p.: an elaborate alchemico-astrological diagram carefully copied in Newton's hand. In the centre is a seven pointed star labelled 'Prima Materia', surrounded by seven more seven-pointed stars each labelled with a gender and humour ('e.g. 'Femina phlegmatica', 'Masculina cholerica'). Each of these in turn is surrounded by the symbols for the seven 'planets'/metals in different configurations. To the right of the diagram, English notes explaining how it should be coloured.

2. Rougher copy of another alchemico-astrological emblem consisting of eight squares containing symbolic names in French (e.g. 'Souphure de terre', 'Loyseau dans son nid', 'La fille du grand Segret' ['Sulphur of earth'; 'the bird in its nest'; 'the great Segret's daughter']), arranged in a geometric grid decked out with a riot of symbols for signs of the zodiac and 'planets'/metals. Beneath this are the letter B surrounded by eight crosses, two allegorical figures labelled 'Simplicita' and 'Prudence', what appears to be a rough sketch of an alchemical operation, and a number of exceptionally cryptic remarks in French such as 'huict Estoilles Cest mon nom' ['eight stars that is my name'] and 'flamel dict Cest son fourneau' ['Flamel says it is his furnace']. 1 p. The reverse had been written on but has been completely blacked out with ink. This sheet is not mentioned in the Sotheby catalogue description.

B

1. 'References': 9 pp. of alchemical subject headings (about five or six on each page) followed in some cases by page references to various alchemical works, the vast majority of them by 'Philalethes' though Ripley and Jan Baptista van Helmont are also mentioned.

2. Notes and abstracts from various authors, in Latin and English, written around some notes about the size and design of a building. 10 pp.

3. 'Testamentum antiquius Clavicula': a list of various (al)chemical terms and sources; also two apparently unrelated geometrical diagrams. 2 pp.

C

1. A further list of alchemical headwords followed by notes and page references to various works: 1 p., on the reverse of a fragmentary draft letter to John Aubrey reading in its entirety: 'Mr Aubrey/ I understand by Mr you have a letter from Mr Lucas for me. Pray forbear to send me any thing more of that nature.'

2. Alchemical jottings in Latin and English on 3 pp.

[50] 28 pp. plus one page blacked out

[51]

Cf. Keynes Mss. 40 and 41 and Dibner Institute NMAHRB Mss. 1070 A. See also Dobbs (who suggests the date), 'Newton Manuscripts at the Smithsonian', 106.

[52]

1. Citations from a wide range of sources, including Lull, Aristotle, Faber, Maier and Basil Valentine. Under the headings: 'Operationum Ordo' (this heading occurs twice in succession but followed by different texts); 'Materiæ Mineralis præparatio prima et conversio in aquam'; 'Extractio et Rectificatio Spiritus'; 'Extractio et Rectificatio Animæ et calcinatio Corporis'; 'Reductio'; 38 pp. of which 6 blank.

2. Earlier drafts of various sections of the above, with the additional headings 'Elementorum Qualitates' and 'Præparatio Corporis'; 18 pp. of which 2 blank.

[53] 56 pp. of which 8 blank.

[54]

in Latin

[55]

See Figala et al., 'De Scriptoribus', 140-41.

[56]

An inventory of Newton's (al)chemical books, printed or in manuscript copies, with shelf marks.

[57] 2 pp. on 4 ff. of which 3 blank.

[58]

Cf. Figala et al., 'De Scriptoribus', esp. 142-3.

[59]

An alphabetical list of about 120 writers on alchemy, with comments on the works of the more important and gaps left for more to be added.

[60] 7 pp. plus 5 pp. blank.

[61]

mainly in Latin with a little English

[62]

SL420 is described in the Sotheby catalogue as only 26 pp. plus a cover, but the cover has since been designated pp. 1-2, and the other page numbers added, by the Babson College Archives. Dobbs's notes include a detailed account of the rather complex physical make-up of the document.

[63]

pp. 1-2 discussed, with a facsimile of p. 2, in Dobbs, Janus Faces, 161-3. The main treatise (pp. 3-20) printed with notes in ibid., 293-305. See also Keynes Mss. 21, 23 and 53, and Westfall, Never at Rest, 529 on the genesis of the work.

[64]

pp. 1-2 Latin notes on the derivation of the names of and symbols for the metals from Egyptian gods, planets, etc., apparently unrelated to the rest of the document.

p. 3 Main heading: 'Praxis'.

'Cap. 1. De Materijs Spermaticis.'

'Chap. 2/ De materia prima'

p. 8 'Cap. 3/ De Sulphure Ph[ilosoph]orum.'

p. 10 'Cap. 4/ De agente primo.'

pp. 12-20 'Chap. 5. Praxis'

pp. 11a-18a: Earlier partial drafts of chapters 4 and 5, in a separate booklet. The page numbers (introduced by the Babson College Archives) indicate the section of the main treatise to which they correspond.

An elaborate discussion of both the theoretical and practical aspects of alchemy. Though the text is densely packed with precise references to the whole range of Newton's vast reading on the subject, 'the conceptualization and organization of the work are certainly Newton's own', as Dobbs puts it (Janus Faces, 293), and she considers it 'Newton's climactic composition in alchemy' (ibid., 295).

[65] 26 pp. of which two blank.

[66]

mainly in English with some Latin

[67]

a) Notes on fermentation and the 'elements', with page references to a wide range of literature, 3 pp. On p. 3: fragment of a draft letter in English, without date or addressee.

b) Miscellaneous notes largely concerning the definition of alchemical terms and the uses to be made of various substances, 7 pp.

c) Notes on the sequence of operations in transmutation, including the headings 'Opus primum'; 'Opus tertium', 'Opus quartum' and 'Opus quintum' (cf. Keynes Mss. 40 and 41 and Dibner Institute Ms. NMAHRB 107A). Also features the beginning of a draft letter, in English, 'For Mr Proctor an Attorney' about succeeding his father in the management of Newton's affairs.

[68] 18 pp. of which 4 blank.

[69]

in Latin

[70]

Requests 'of Antimony about sixty pounds of Copper oare 12 or 16 pounds' and other metallic ores 'from [...] Bohemia or more especially from Hungary'. On reverse: a fragmentary medical recipe and some musings on the distinction between knowledge and wisdom, c. 100 words.

Possibly related to Newton's letter to Francis Aston, 18 May 1669 (Brewster (1855), 1: 387-9; NC, 1: 9-13), in which he advises him to make a number of chemical and metallurgical enquiries during his forthcoming European tour, Bohemia and Hungary (among other places) being specified.

[71] 1 p.

[72]

in English

[73] 4 pp. on 2 ff.

[74]

in English

[75]

See H997 and H1608.

[76] 4 pp. on 2 ff.

[77]

Described in the Sotheby catalogue as 8 pp. enclosed in a folded sheet used for geometrical diagrams: the wrapper accounts for 4 pp. of which one blank.

[78]

See Figala et al., 'De Scriptoribus'.

[79]

Includes (p. 7) a list of 27 items headed: 'Desiderantur opera Lullij sequentia'.

[80] 12 pp. of which one blank.

[81]

Annotated transcript (pp. 163-179) and extensive discussion, including arguments for dating, in Figala et al., 'De Scriptoribus'. Cf. Stanford Ms. M132/2/3 and Keynes Ms. 13.

[82]

An (al)chemical bibliography containing titles and particulars of 90 works (six of which are evidently later additions by Newton to his original list), for the most part printed but some in manuscript.

[83] 5 pp.

[84] 1 p.

[85]

in English

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Professor Rob Iliffe
Director, AHRC Newton Papers Project

Scott Mandelbrote,
Fellow & Perne librarian, Peterhouse, Cambridge

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford, OX1 2RL - newtonproject@history.ox.ac.uk

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