Catalogue Entry: THEM00312

Book I: Chapter 12

Author: John Milton

Source: A Treatise on Christian Doctrine, Compiled from the Holy Scriptures Alone, vol. 1 (Boston: 1825).

[Normalized Text] [Diplomatic Text]

[1]

..... the fruit

Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste

Brought death into the world,and all our woe.

Paradise Lost, I. 1.

[2]

The divine denunciation is interpreted in the same sense in Paradise Lost:

.... my sole command

Transgress'd, inevitably thou shalt die,

From that day mortal; and this happy state

Shalt lose, expell'd from hence into a world

Of woe and sorrow. VIII. 329.

[3]

..... innocence, that as a veil

Had shadow'd them from knowing ill, was gone,

Just confidence, and native righteousness,

And honour, from about them, naked left

To guilty shame. Paradise Lost, IX, 1054.

[4]

See p. 77. note. And again; —'For there are left some remains of God's image in man, as he is merely man'-. Tetrachordon. Prose Works, II. 124.

[5]

Ad asserendam justitiam Dei. Milton introduces the Latinism in his Paradise Lost:

That to the height of this great argument

I may assert eternal Providence,

And justify the ways of God to men. I. 24.

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Professor Rob Iliffe
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