Catalogue Entry: THEM00052

Treatise on Revelation

Author: Isaac Newton

Source: Yahuda Ms. 9, National Library of Israel, Jerusalem, Israel

Custodial History

SL247 was bought at the Sotheby sale by Gabriel Wells for £42, and sold to Yahuda in mid-August 1936. It then seems that a substantial part of SL257 (which Yahuda bought from Maggs Brothers at about the same time) was added to it. The miscellaneous notes on religion constituting the rest of SL257 are now Yahuda Var. 1 Ms. 41, which may also contain some sheets taken from SL247.

Sotheby Lot

SL247 and part of SL257

Contents

Ms. 9.1

ff. 1-2 Fragment on Biblical prophecy, beginning missing.

ff. 3-4 Table of contents or draft outline:

[f. 3r] 'The first book. Concerning ye language of the Prophets.

The Preface

Chap. 1/ A Synopsis of ye Prophetick Figures.

Chap. 2/ Of ye world, heaven & earth, ascending to heaven & descending to Earth, rising out of ye earth or waters & falling into them moving from place to place, earthquakes, shaking & passing away of heaven & earth.

Chap. 3/ Of things celestial vizt ye Sun Moon & Starrs, light & darkness, darkning smiting or setting of ye sun moon & starrs, Eclipsing or turning ye Moon into blood, falling of ye Starrs, New Moons, , days and nights, scorching wth ye Sun's heat, burning with fire, a flaming sword

Chap. 4/ Of Meteors, vizt Clouds, riding on ye clouds, covering ye Sun with a Cloud or wth smoke, Winds, Whirlwinds, Thunder lightning, hail overflowing rain, moderate rain, Dew, living water & want of rain.

Chap. 5/ Of things terrestrial vizt dry land, Sea rivers, floods, wilderness, embittering of waters, turning them to blood, overflowing of a sea or river, drying up of waters, ffountains, Mountains, Islands, dens & rocks of mountains & hiding men in them, Cities, houses & ships.

Chap. 6/ Of living things, vizt Trees, hearbs, reeds, & other vegetables, Locusts & other insects, wild beasts, Birds & ffishes .

Chap. 7/ How several kingdoms are signified by several parts of the world, as by the heaven, the earth, the sea, a river, , a species of animals or of vegetables, or any animal or vegetable put for ye whole species, as a lyon a Goat a Dragon a Whore, a Frog a Vine a Lamb, a Seraphim, a Cherubim.

[f. 4r] Chap. 8/ Of ye parts of an animal, vizt the head or heads & taile, ye horns, ye eyes, & seeing, the mouth, & speaking & eating, ye voice loud or faint, ye hairs, feathers, wings, arms, feet, nails, teeth, serpentine taile, & bones, & of the times of their life & actions.

Chap. 9/ Of a man or woman in various circumstances, as wth a crown or on horsback, or wth a sword or bow, or wth weights & measures or cloathed in white or in other apparel or naked, or holding a cup of wine or drinking it, or with a wound or sore or in pain. or pained in child-birth, or bearing a man child & of the death of man or beast, & of worshipping them & their images.

Chap. 10/ Of ye parts of ye temple

Ch. 11/ The third Book/ Concerning the method of ye Apocalyps & the Allusions therein to ye law & history of ye Iews.

The fourth book/ Concerning the Persons & things prophesied of in ye Apocalyps, vizt ye 7 Angells two Witnesses, Whore Dragon, two Beasts & their Horns. 3 Horns pluckt up 7 Horns remaining Horns & their churches.

The fift Book/ Concerning the history of the Apocalyps.

Chap 1. The ten horns

2 The first six seals opened & six heads of ye Dragon & Beast described

3 The seventh head & seven Trumpets & Vials.'

ff. 5-51 Explanation of prophetic figures (untitled), broadly following the scheme set out in chapter headings 1 to 10 above.

Ms. 9.2

f. 1r 'The Second Book

Concerning the method & synchronisms of the Apocalyps & the allusions therein to the Law & History of the Iews'

f. 1r 'Chap. 1/ Of the daily sacrifice spoken of by Daniel & the feast of ye Passover./ The Preface./ Sect. I The Lamps drest.'

f. 6r 'Sect. II. The morning sacrifice.'

f. 11r 'Sect. III. The evening sacrifice.'

f. 14r 'Sect. III [sic] The Feasts of ye seventh Month'

f. 20r 'Sect. V The prophesying in ye ffast & ffeast of Tabernacles '

f. 24r 'The interpretation of ye prophesying in ye ffast & ffeast of Tabernacles.

f. 33r 'Sect. IV./ The interpretation of ye Prophesy of ye Seales & Trumpets.'

f. 39r 'The second part of the interpretation.'

f. 43v 'The third part of the Interpretation.'

f. 44v 'The third part of the Interpretation' [another draft].

f. 47r 'Allusions to The passing of Israel out of Egypt through ye wilderness into Canaan, to Their Idolatry in Canaan, & ye Babylonical captivity.'

f. 59r 'Sect. VIII./ The two Churches true & fals together, with the two Kingdomes whose Churches they are./ The division of the Kingdome & it's church.'

f. 62r 'The prophetical history of the division.'

f. 64r 'Of the two fals churches signified by the two-horned Beast & woman wch fled into ye Wildnernes, & that this Woman became the Whore of Babylon.'

f. 73r 'Of the two true churches signified by ye two Witnesses.'

f. 81r 'Sect. IX./ The seven Churches. .'

f. 97r 'Sect. X./ The Apostacy of the latter times described in the Prophesies of the old & New Testament.'

ff. 123r-178 'The end of ye world day of Iudgment & world to come'

Ms. 9.3

Apparently a resumption of Ms. 9.2 in Humphrey Newton's hand, though there is a section missing between the two parts which includes the beginning of Ms. 9.3 (11 ff.).

Notes

Approximately dateable since a substantial part of the manuscript is in Humphrey Newton's hand (up to Ms. 9.2 f. 45 the hand alternates between Isaac and Humphrey Newton's; from that point on the main text is entirely in Humphrey's hand but with occasional interpolations, corrections and additions by Isaac).

ff. 1-32r of Ms. 9.2 published in Goldish, Judaism, 188-218.

[1] Sext. Empir adv. Mathem. l 5. p. 114. l.

[2] a that is, iniquity

[3] a that is, iniquity

[4] ✱ gr. hide or bury them.

[5] ✱ gr. & vulg. lat. holes

[6] ✝ Iustin. l. 7.

[7] a Diodor. l 1 p 55.

[8] b Diodor. ib.

[9] a Sanchoniathon et Philo Biblius

[10]

b Heliogabalus Ægyptios Dracunculos Romæ habuit, quos illi Agathodæmonas appellant Æl. Lamprid.

Phœnices serpentem αγαθοδαίμονα vocant, quemadmodum et Ægyptij Cneph appellant Euseb. lib. 1 Praep. Evan cap. 7.

[11] c Aspides ab Ægyptijs vehementer coli tradidit Phylarchus Hist. l. 12 et ex eo Ælianus l. 17 de An. c. 5. Of the Babylonians, Indians & others worshipping Dragons & Serpents see the apocryphal history of Bel & the Dragon, & Maximus Tyrius dissert. 38.

[12] d. Horus Hierogl. 1.

[13] e. Diodor. l. 1. Aelian l. 6 de Animal. c. 38.

[14] f. Horus Hierogl. 56, 57, 58, 60, 61.

[15] g. Clemens Alex Strom l. 5 p 555.

[16] h. Philo Bibl. apud Euseb.

[17] k. AElig;lian. Hist. l. 10 c. 21.

[18] a Primum signum totius Legionis est Aquila quam Aquilifer portat, Dracones etiam per singulas cohortes a Draconarijs feruntur ad prælium. Modestus de vocab. rei militaris. & Vegetius de re milit. l. 2. c. 13. Vide etiam Vegetium l. 2, c. 6, 7 & l. 3 c. 5. Vexilla horrendis Draconum hiatibus super summas hastas elatis involantia ac pertractus contextis squammis distinctos ventilata jucundissimum simul et formidulosum spectaculum oculis præbent. Greg. Naz. Orat. 1

[19] b Ammianus lib 16 in descriptione pompæ qua Romam ingressus est Constantius, de signis militaribus loquens, Alios, inquit, purpureis subtegminibus texti circumdedere Dracones, hastarum aureis gemmatisque summitatibus illigati, hiatu vasto perflatiles, & ideo velut ira percili sibilantes, caudarumque volumina relinquentes in ventum. Idem eodem libro, in descriptione prælij cujusdam, ait: Quo agnito per purpureum signum Draconis summitati hastæ longioris aptatum &c.

[20] c Vexillum Græcis dicebatur Δρακόντειον & Signifer, Δρακοντειοφόρος & Δρακονάριος. Gloss. Signiferi dicuntur qui signa portant quos nunc Draconarios vocant. Modestus de voc. rei mili

[21] Ezek. 1.

[22] Isa. 21.

[23] NB the preceding 8 pages much the same as Ch. 1. viz Synopsis of Prophetic figures

[24] a Maimon. de cultu divino. Tractæ cap. 7. sec. 3, 5 & Tract. 6. c. 6. sect. 1, 3.

[25] b Apoc. 3.7

[26] c. Suidas tells us that χαλκολίβανον is a sort of Electrum or Amber more valuable than Gold; being Gold in another form mint with glass & steel The word is as much as to say, χαλκοειδὴς λίβανος (as Andreas Cæsariensis notes) that is amber of the colour of Copper & consequently like a coal of fire. For nothing resembles fire so much as amber doth. Whence in Ezek. the fiery appearance of the throne of God is also represented by the colour of Amber.

[27] a Κυριακη της ἀναστεος Χριστου μνημόσυνον φέρουσα Andr. Cæsar that is the Lords day is that which carries the memorial of Christ's resurrection.

[28] See Lightfoot's description of synagogues out of the Talmudists in his Horæ Hebr. upon Matth. 4.23.

[29] Chron. 24 & 25 Josephus Antiq. 6. 11 & in vita sua sub initio. Maimonides De Cultu Divino Tract. 2, c. 3. 8 9 & c 4 3, 4. & tract 6, c. 7 , 5. 12

[30] b Num 2.3 & 3.38

[31] c Ezek. 40.45, 46.

[32] d See Lightfoot's Prospect of the Temple service, c. 2.

[33] a Ezek. 42.13.

[34] a στὰν ἔχον διπλην ἐν μέσω του νεὼ τετυχη κότος, ἀφορωσαν εἰς τὰς θύρας ἀυτου Ioseph. Antiq. lib. 15. c 14.

[35] See Mr Mede

[36] Note:The contents of this note are only visible in the diplomatic transcript because they were deleted on the original manuscript

[37] Isa. 6.

[38] f Maimon. Cult. Div. Tract 2. c 6 § 1. 5

[39] a Ecclesiastic 50 17. Maimon. De cultu Divino tract. 6 c. 6. S. 7.

[40] ✝ Maimon. cult. Div. Tr. 2. c. 5 & c. 2. & Tr. 6 c. 6 S. 5. & Tr. 3, c. 2, s. 2.

[41] Deut. 31.26.

[42] Targam Ionathan in Deut. 31.26.

[43] Isa. 8.16 & 29.10, 11.

[44] Dan. 8 & 12.

[45] Maimon. Cult. Div. tract 8. c 1 2. 3, 5. Talmud Hierosol. in Ioma c. 1

[46] Deut. 17.48. a, b. Vide Buxtorfii Vindic. Verit. Heb. p. 906.

[47] Deut 31.10, 11, 26.

[48] Talmud Hieros. Ioma c. 7, 5. 4. Maimon. Cult. div. Tract. 8, c. 4, S. 2

[49] Note:The contents of this note are only visible in the diplomatic transcript because they were deleted on the original manuscript

[50] e Mane inter sanguinem et membra suffiebat, vesperi inter membra et libamina. Talmud Hierosol. in Ioma cap 3, sec. 5.

[51] a See Mark 16.19 & Lightfoot upon the place.

[52] b See Lightfoot Vol. 1. p 1139.

[53] b See Lightfoot Vol. 1. p 1139.

[54] See the backside

[55] Ezek. 9 & 10

[56] Eph. 1.13.

[57] 2 Esdr. 2.38, 40, 41, 42.

[58] Luke 1.

[59] a Scriptores Hebræi paucitatem indicaturi dicunt Numerus sunt. Et viri numeri sunt viri pauci. Sic Dies memini et populus numeri id est paucus. Theocritus quoque ἀριθματοὺς pro paucis usurpat. Drusius in Apoc. 13.8.

[60] a Maimon. de Cult. div. tr. 2, c. 3, s. 5.

[61] Dan. 12

[62] Ezek. 2 & 3

[63] Iob. 32.18.

[64] Prov. 22.18

[65] Iohn 7.38.

[66] a See Iosephus Antiq. l. 8. p. 265, 26{illeg} & de Bel. Iud. l. 6. c. 14, p. 916 & l. 7. c. 10, p. 949, 950.

[67] 2 Pet. 5.

[68] Maimon

[69] Exod. 29.40. Maimon.

[70] Iames 5.17 1 King. 17.

[71] Ezek 29.3 & 32.2

[72] Isa. 51.9

[73] see Bochart's Geog. sac. l. 4. c. 2. p. 294. Psal. 74.13, 14

[74] vers. 16, כדכד pearls according to the Chalde Paraphrast.

[75] vers. 17. צרי.

[76] Q. Curt. l. 5. c. 1.

[77] Strabo l. 16

[78] Exod. 15.8.

[79] 1 Kings 4.14 & 15.28, 29.

[80] 1 Kings. 16.2

[81] 2 King. 9.6, 7

[82] a Suidas in Πέργαμον

[83] Iustin lib. 36

[84] Iustin l. 39

[85] לאלה, To or together with

[86] Mahuzzim, strengths, strong ones, Protectors Defenders, Guardians, mighty Patr{ons.} See Medes apostacy of the latter times.

[87] See Mede's computation out of Ierom

[88] See Lightfoot on Rev. 13.

[89] Talm. in Taawith fol 69 col. 1.

[90] See Lightfoot on Iohn 7.37.

[91]

Clem. Alexandr. Strom. 5. p. 549. c {illeg}

Tertull de anima c. 35 &

Origen in Exod 11.10 quæaer 2

Cypr. Epist. 52 Cæsar hom. 7

Greg. Niss. orat. Catech. {8}

<136r>

Hieron. in Is. c. ult. in fin. & in Oseam c. 14 & in Amos c. 7, & in Matt c. 3.

Ambros in Psalm 118 serm 3 & serm 20 in fin. & in Luk c. 12.

Augustin Enchir ad Lurent. c. 67, 68, 69 & de civit. Dei. 21 c. 13 & sequ. et alibi.

[92] חצלעח one placed in the side, the outcast. See the Chald. Paraph

[93] Apoc 21.3

[94] b Apoc. 20

[95] c Apoc. 19.18 & 9.17

[96] Dan. 11.40, 45.

[97] Apoc 10.7

[98] Apoc 16.18, 20

[99] Apoc 19.21.

[100] Apoc. 16.18, 21

[101] Apoc. 19.17, 21

[102] Apoc 16.17

[103] Apoc 16.14

[104] Apoc 19.17, 18

[105] Apoc. 19.

[106] Apoc 14.14

[107] Apoc 21.24

[108] Apoc. 21.25, 26

[109] Apoc. 21.23. & 22.5

[110] Apoc. 7.17 & 21.4

[111] Apoc 22.4 & 3.12.

[112] Apoc 29.7 & 21.2

[113] Apoc 19.15 & 14.28

[114] Apoc 14.10

[115] Apoc 13.1, 6.

[116] Apoc 22.4 & 3.12

[117] Apoc 21.1

[118] Apoc 21.4 & 7.17

[119] Apoc. 19.21.

[120] Apoc 25.1

[121] p 33

[122] Epist 77

[123] Epist 72

[124] Epist 55

[125] Epist 80

[126] Sulp. Hist. lib. 2 in fine.

[127] Hist. lib. 1, c. 43

[128] Hist. lib. 2. c. 47.

[129] Serm. De tempore Barbarico.

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